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  1. #16
    us
    Jun 2006
    Out in the hills near wherendaheckarwe
    WHITES, MINELAB, Garrett
    4,199
    2798 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Re: metal detecting laws arizona

    Quote Originally Posted by BLACKFOOT
    It burns My A-s every time They pass a law to do Good then some square HEADED cop pulls it out when you are only dectecting on some mountain for gold..

    When ever I see that cr-p to PROTECT an serve on a cop car makes me want to have a BOWEL movement.
    There is no PROTECT ABOUT ANY OF THEM, in the last week within 15 miles of my home there have been FOUR MURDERS!! WHERE WAS THEIR PROTECTION?? I live in rural oklahoma just small towns.
    To bad those four people were not PARANOID like i am and were carring a gun they might be alive today. The SUPREME COURT RULED THAT THE POLICE WERE NOT HERE TO PROTECT YOU...

    Blackfoot

    What burns my butt is when you see murders or a DB found in a house or apartment in Phoenix, you see twenty officers standing around with their hands in their pockets four hours after the coroner shows up Then the next day or so you see Phoenix PD whining about how under manned they are Who's covering the other areas these officers aren't covering? Forget it if you need a cop anywhere in S. Phoenix! At least 20+ minutes for them to show up, and lord forbid they have to write a report! They gotta go because they have ten calls backed up on their MDT But if someone calls re: a suspicious guy with a "mine detector" in a park theres at least three officers there lickety split! Go figure Guess they all failed the deployment part of the Criminal Justice courses

    I know it's here, just need a bigger coil!

    I think I know what my last words will be....
    "Hold my beer and watch this!"

  2. #17

    Jan 2007
    Heavener oklahoma
    fisher gold bug2
    247
    5 times

    Re: metal detecting laws arizona

    There is a site on land my grandfather owed that has arrowheads an stuff that we had dug up for years UNTIL I HELPED THE ARCHIES HAUL TRASH FROM A FENCE ROW CLEAN UP JOB FROM CORP. OF ENGINEER LAND.
    THEY ARE NOT EVER GOING TO DIG THAT AREA WE USED A DOZER TO MIX THE TRASH INTO THE GROUND!!!!
    SO I WILL KEEP ON DOING WHAT I WANT TO DO.IF I FIND A ARROWHEAD WHILE DEER HUNTING I AM SUPPOSEDTO LEAVE IT THERE, HOW STUPID DO YOU THINK I AM.
    if you like what you are getting, keep doing what you are doing!!
    Life Member Viet Nam Veterans of America.
    N.R.A. Member
    GPAA Member

  3. #18
    us
    Jul 2009
    Phoenix, Arizona
    Whites TDI
    280
    23 times

    Re: metal detecting laws arizona

    Since Blackfoot is a Federal Antiquity, does that mean if he gets buried in an avalanche, we'd be arrested
    for digging him up? Geesh, I'm one too! I found a link that seems to list the regulations for metal detecting, but it seems pretting friggin daft, like if I'm out detecting and I find an 1866 coin, I am suppose to throw it back and re-bury it? It seems ridiculus. Next thing you know they will have a law against farting.


    http://74.125.155.132/search?q=cache...&ct=clnk&gl=us
    We must question the story logic of having an all-knowing, all-powerful god, who creates faulty humans and then blames them for his own mistakes.  Gene Roddenberry

  4. #19

    Feb 2008
    1,487
    32 times

    Re: metal detecting laws arizona

    "So until you catch me....i'll continue to wander the hills and do what i do...in my quest for the
    truth."

    "SO I WILL KEEP ON DOING WHAT I WANT TO DO. IF I FIND A ARROWHEAD WHILE DEER HUNTING I AM SUPPOSEDTO LEAVE IT THERE, HOW STUPID DO YOU THINK I AM."

    Yet it is not deer hunting you be doing is it. It is relic hunting.
    Do you go deer hunting when ever you like?? How about rob a bank or steal from your neighbor, due to you need a buck?
    How about shoplift a candy at the store because you want one?

    So obsessed with relics, some will ignore laws. Because you can get by with it does not make it right.
    Is it worth the risk? Is it worth what you are doing to yourself?

  5. #20
    us
    Sep 2008
    5
    1 times

    Re: metal detecting laws arizona

    Finders keepers......loser weeper......if I find it.... then its mine......after all these years......if I leave it who will know it was ever there?....after reading this forum it sounds like there a lot of arm chair critics.....live and let it be......who cares if its not found then its not known......pick it up and show the world......if you don't like it stick it where the sun doesn't shine.....if you want to keep people out put up a fence.....other wise life is to short to worry about the small stuff.......go ahead and save the world..... any person who picks up a rock is guilty of the same crime .....where do you draw the line?......

    thanks to all those that pick up, find and post items....... with out you these arm chair critics would have nothing to do....

    OH by the way all this urban development ruins more pristine desert than any of the few collectors out there....I have watched many bulldozers destroy a lot more ancient rock carvings than were saved.....oh yeah what about all these golf courses that lay on top of Indian ruins? you arm chair guys really should re-think who you blast before you type......

    db
    YumaMarc likes this.

  6. #21
    us
    Jun 2010
    Mobile, AL
    MXT Pro
    61
    10 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Re: metal detecting laws arizona

    Let's put some reality to this post. First off the ARPA does not stop you from recovering coins or any other metal object that is not at least 100 years old and it MUST be of Archaeological or Historical significance to be protected, so says the law. So if you find an old cap and ball pistol it is yours unless they can prove it belonged to Geronimo or someone else of importance. Also arrowheads that are on the surface can be picked up and taken home, not protected under the law.
    If you want to know more about this go to the FMDAC website at www.fmdac.org and look under the "Legislation" link.
    A lot of people misinterput the laws for their own greed (both metal detectionist and archaeologist). LC is correct that most important finds have been made by the amautur just out exploring but the paid archaeologist will take the credit most of the time, after the fact.
    Prospecting for gold is another matter, here in the 11 western states. It is protected by the 1866 and 1872 Mining Laws.

  7. #22
    us
    Jan 2014
    Northern Arizona
    At Pro
    1
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Actually, I think most here are just meaning to go out and hunt some coins, gold, silver and jewelry and a few relics. I know about the Rock paintings being stolen, cut right out and square scarrs left behind. Many other things in Arizona have been ruined and destroyed which are a part of the States history and American history too for that matter. At the same time, if many small relics and coins aren't found, they will soon decay into nothingness. If a Police Officer sees someone out metal detecting and there are a lot of holes left behind and trash from the mans lunch etc. I think then the man should be cited for not cleaning up after himself and filling in his holes. People should not remove or be allowed to keep Ancient Indian Pots or other works of art that are made by the indigenous people from the area. And yet, where do you draw the line? No keeping of Arrowheads or small beads? Digging in an old ghost towns trash heap doesn't sound like much to me. I tell people to go and enjoy the ghost towns. It doesn't mean to tear them apart or dig in and around them. People should visit them and enjoy them. Few Gtowns in Arizona stand due to years ago, the owners set them ablaze so they wouldn't have to pay taxes on them. What we need here is a map of where we can prospect and metal detect. I think people are afraid to let others know where it is legal to prospect. Everyone's afraid someone else will find what they are looking for. If it wasn't for the average Joes looking around at his surroundings, many historical finds would never have been found.

  8. #23
    donald peterson

    Jan 2013
    somewhere between flagstaff, preskit
    Whites prism III
    4,541
    1973 times
    Relic Hunting
    Mesa Verde


    yep...AMATURES found mesa verde, looted mesa verde, now, what is left, is held by the us government, and people complain they cant go dig up what is left.
    the old ones just walked off and left everything...stolen, sold, now in homes across the globe, but few know where the artifact they hide in the bedroom came from.

    yep...amateur

  9. #24
    donald peterson

    Jan 2013
    somewhere between flagstaff, preskit
    Whites prism III
    4,541
    1973 times
    Relic Hunting
    every one of these ruins was looted by amateurs seeking relics.

    Canyon de Chelly, A Photo Gallery

  10. #25
    donald peterson

    Jan 2013
    somewhere between flagstaff, preskit
    Whites prism III
    4,541
    1973 times
    Relic Hunting
    MDHTALK - Arizona Metal Detecting Law & Regulations

    since ya dug out this antique thread...

  11. #26
    donald peterson

    Jan 2013
    somewhere between flagstaff, preskit
    Whites prism III
    4,541
    1973 times
    Relic Hunting
    Agency: Bureau of Reclamation
    Website: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-200...-sec423-27.pdf
    Law: Section 423.29 Natural and Cultural Resources
    (f) You must not possess a metal detector or other geophysical discovery device, or use a metal detector or other geophysical discovery techniques to locate or recover subsurface objects or features, except:
    (1) When transporting, but not using a metal detector or other geophysical discovery device in a vehicle on a public road as allowed under applicable Federal, state and local law, or:
    (2) As allowed by permit issued pursuantto subpart D of this 423.

  12. #27
    donald peterson

    Jan 2013
    somewhere between flagstaff, preskit
    Whites prism III
    4,541
    1973 times
    Relic Hunting
    Agency: Army Corps of Engineers
    Website: eCFR ? Code of Federal Regulations
    Law: Title 36: Parks, Forests, and Public Property

    CHAPTER III--CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY Webpage

    § 327.14 Public property.
    (a) Destruction, injury, defacement, removal or any alteration of public property including, but not limited to, developed facilities, natural formations, mineral deposits, historical and archaeological features, paleontological resources, boundary monumentation or markers and vegetative growth, is prohibited except when in accordance with written permission of the District Commander.
    (b) Cutting or gathering of trees or parts of trees and/or the removal of wood from project lands is prohibited without written permission of the District Commander.
    (c) Gathering of dead wood on the ground for use in designated recreation areas as firewood is permitted, unless prohibited and posted by the District Commander.
    (d) The use of metal detectors is permitted on designated beaches or other previously disturbed areas unless prohibited by the District Commander for reasons of protection of archaeological, historical or paleontological resources. Specific information regarding metal detector policy and designated use areas is available at the Manager's Office. Items found must be handled in accordance with §§ 327.15 and 327.16 except for non-identifiable items such as coins of value less than $25.

  13. #28
    donald peterson

    Jan 2013
    somewhere between flagstaff, preskit
    Whites prism III
    4,541
    1973 times
    Relic Hunting
    Agency: Bureau of Land Management
    Website: Metal Detecting, Bureau of Land Management, California
    Law: Metal detecting is a recreational activity that people do to find coins, jewelry, and precious metals. Metal detecting is allowed on BLM lands as long as no artifacts are removed. Artifacts should be left alone and reported to the appropriate Field Office. Avoid all cultural and archeological sites. The Metal Detecting enthusiast may remove some rocks (handful) from areas such as picnic areas, campground areas, and recreational sites. The enthusiasts may remove some rocks as long as there not being removed from another mining claim. Mining claims can be researched on the LR2000 (LR2000- BLM). Enthusiasts are only allowed to make minimal surface disturbance (i.e. removing a couple of stones for memories).

  14. #29
    donald peterson

    Jan 2013
    somewhere between flagstaff, preskit
    Whites prism III
    4,541
    1973 times
    Relic Hunting
    Agency: National Forests
    Website: http://www.fs.fed.us/outernet/r9/cnn...detectors.html
    Law: The Use of Metal Detectors on National Forest Land

    The use of metal detectors has become a popular hobby for many people. Here is direction on how or when metal detectors can be used on the Chequamegon-Nicolet.

    Metal detector use is allowed in developed campgrounds and picnic areas if they are not specifically closed to such activity. If archaeological remains are known to exist in a campground or picnic area, a closure to metal detecting would be posted. It is permissible to collect coins, but prospecting for gold would be subject to mining laws. However, you should know that agencies have not identified every archaeological site on public lands, so it is possible you may run into such remains that have not yet been discovered. Archaeological remains on federal land, known or unknown, are protected under law. If you were to discover such remains, you should leave them undisburbed, stop metal detecting in that area, and notify the local FS office. I have included the legal citations below for your information.

    The Forest Service has conducted numerous projects in conjuntion with metal detectorists and metal detecting clubs through our volunteer archaeological program, Passport In Time (PIT). The cooperation has been fun for both the detectorists and the agency's archaeologists. Locating archaeological sites becomes a joint endeavor and we learn a lot! You can receive the PIT Traveler, our free newsletter advertising the PIT projects each year, by calling 1-800-281-9176. Look for the ones where we request metal detecting expertise!

    Here are the legal citations:
    Code of Federal Regulations, 36 CFR 261.9: "The following are prohibited: (g) digging in, excavating, disturbing, injuring, destroying, or in any way damaging any prehistoric, historic, or archaeological resources, structure, site, artifact, or property. (h) Removing any prehistoric, historic, or archaeological resources, structure, site, artifact, property."

    USDA Forest Service Manual Direction (draft): "Metal Detector Use. Metal detectors may be used on public lands in areas that do not contain or would not reasonably be expected to contain archaeological or historical resources. They must be used, however, for lawful purposes. Any act with a metal detector that violates the proscriptions of the Archaeological Resources Protection Act (ARPA) or any other law is prosecutable. Normally, developed campgrounds, swimming beaches, and other developed recreation sites are open to metal detecting unless there are heritage resources present. In such cases, Forest Supervisors are authorized to close these sites by posting notices in such sites."

    ARPA, 16 U.S.C. 470cc: "No person may excavate, remove, damage, or otherwise alter or deface or attempt to excavate, remove, damage or otherwise alter or deface any archaeological resources located on public lands or Indianlands unless such activity is pursuant to a permit. . ."

    For more information, contact Mark Bruhy, Supervisor's Office, 68 S. Stevens St., Rhinelander, WI 54501, 715-362-1361, or email mbruhy@fs.fed.us.

  15. #30
    donald peterson

    Jan 2013
    somewhere between flagstaff, preskit
    Whites prism III
    4,541
    1973 times
    Relic Hunting
    Agency: National Parks, Monuments, Seashores, Forests, and Public Property
    Website:
    Law: Title 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property Website

    PART 2—RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION
    § 2.1 Preservation of natural, cultural and archeological resources. Website Section

    (a) Except as otherwise provided in this chapter, the following is prohibited:
    (1) Possessing, destroying, injuring, defacing, removing, digging, or disturbing from its natural state:
    (iii) Nonfossilized and fossilized paleontological specimens, cultural or archeological resources, or the parts thereof.
    (iv) A mineral resource or cave formation or the parts thereof.
    (3) Tossing, throwing or rolling rocks or other items inside caves or caverns, into valleys, canyons, or caverns, down hillsides or mountainsides, or into thermal features.
    (5) Walking on, climbing, entering, ascending, descending, or traversing an archeological or cultural resource, monument, or statue, except in designated areas and under conditions established by the superintendent.
    (6) Possessing, destroying, injuring, defacing, removing, digging, or disturbing a structure or its furnishing or fixtures, or other cultural or archeological resources.
    (7) Possessing or using a mineral or metal detector, magnetometer, side scan sonar, other metal detecting device, or subbottom profiler.

    This paragraph does not apply to:
    (i) A device broken down and stored or packed to prevent its use while in park areas.
    (ii) Electronic equipment used primarily for the navigation and safe operation of boats and aircraft.
    (iii) Mineral or metal detectors, magnetometers, or subbottom profilers used for authorized scientific, mining, or administrative activities.

 

 
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