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Thread: more precious than gold.

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  1. #1
    us
    Manuel

    Dec 2012
    Strathmore Ca
    Whites DFX.
    148
    33 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    more precious than gold.

    We give gold a high intrinsic value.its the reason we're miners.treasure hunters and more.today I'll share something missed in the history books.most of it is based in the oral tradition of my ancestors on my Mother's side.it's a story of a especial tree which seeds were held in high steem by the Aztec.it's not cacao beans.the seed called "Hushe" was way more scarce in Aztec times.even today there are a few dozen trees that survive.my Grandmother used to say that hundreds of years ago it was forbidden to eat these seeds.it was collected and sent to the "Lords of the big city" as tribute.as it would offered as a drink to the Gods.I happened to roast and grind some seeds myself and to my surprise it tasted splendid.even better than Chocolate.I hope that one day this trees can be protected and maybe reforest its native range.for now it would be a good thing for people to know more about this very special tree.it would add to The new world History.and maybe just maybe Mi Amigo Tayopa would enjoy a hot and delicious Hushe drink.
    Last edited by distribuidorUSA; Nov 01, 2014 at 10:56 PM. Reason: misspelling

  2. #2
    mx
    May 2010
    873
    369 times
    I spent 10 minutes with Google, and only names of families and places came up. Any more information available? I would be willing to attempt to grow them, but need seeds for that. If you have access to seeds, perhaps you can get a photo of the tree.

    I told my Aztec wife what you said. She said, yes, there was such a tree whose seeds were ordered to the Emperor. But, finally admitted it was cacao.

    I gotta' go see my cousin-builder and will ask him. He knows things no one else knows.
    Last edited by piegrande; Nov 03, 2014 at 01:20 PM.

  3. #3
    us
    Manuel

    Dec 2012
    Strathmore Ca
    Whites DFX.
    148
    33 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Hi Piegrande.I had plans to one day be able to grow these trees myself.and try to sell Hushe in a manner similar to coffe or chocolate.but the scarcity of the trees makes it hard for now.of course I can get you some seeds.but do you have the means to take this in a serious way.Mi Idea is to grow a few thousand trees.even though I know nothing about how long it takes for the trees to mature .one thing I noticed is that they only grow on the shadows of north facing cliffs.they don't like to much sun.

  4. #4
    us
    May 2010
    texas
    1,273
    2460 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    I also Googled Hushe tree, and "arbol Hushe" with no luck at all. So since the J in Spanish is pronounce like the H in English, I Googled "Juche", and find that it is native to Costa Rica. It is the Plumeria Rubra (Juche), and it does bear seed pods, but the seeds are kind of thin. Would this be the tree?

    Homar

  5. #5
    us
    Manuel

    Dec 2012
    Strathmore Ca
    Whites DFX.
    148
    33 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    No.Homar.the tree has this pod the size of a marble.the skin of the pod looks like an avocado's.inside grow tree seeds in a manner similar to to Garlic.

  6. #6
    ec
    May 2013
    Ecuador, America
    1,576
    2134 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    What country was this tree in and where did it grow; lowlands, costa, montanas…..
    Can you post a picture of it?

  7. #7
    us
    Manuel

    Dec 2012
    Strathmore Ca
    Whites DFX.
    148
    33 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    This trees grow in the mountains of Southern Mexico.but to the best of my knowledge they are found only in a 20 mile long range.I'll try to get some pics in the future.I live in California but I'll arrange something.

  8. #8
    us
    Jun 2012
    alabama
    130
    56 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    the best way to prevent the loss of a plant is to distribute its seeds world wide(kudzu is with us forever).but you need to hurry ,the U.S.A. government may make the tree illegal.

  9. #9
    mx
    May 2010
    873
    369 times
    There is no cliff on my property. And, I could make shade for small trees, but this is a sunny place. That leaves me out.

    What I'd like to get that would grown on my property, not sure right now of the name, something like Joringa. The leaves make a soup that is very nutritious. I can get the seeds in the US but Mexican law prohibits importation without permission. Advocates say it can nearly eliminate starvation in poor places.

    The Aztecs allegedly had to import even their chocolate.

    Sometimes trees do not meet the stated conditions. We have over 90 huaje trees on our land. The scientists claim it only grows at much lower altitude, but here they are, and prosperous. The seed pods are used in sauces.

    We also have orchids growing in the back yard. They grow wild here, though in the US rich folks spend a fortune to grow them in their homes.

    Edited: probably moringa plants are the ones that can supply so much nutrition.

  10. #10
    us
    Manuel

    Dec 2012
    Strathmore Ca
    Whites DFX.
    148
    33 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Huaje.or Guaje grows pretty much everywhere you plant them.Y had a tree here in my home and I had to get rid of it because I started to have seedlings everywhere.And I don't really like the taste or smell of it.you need a relly good mouth rinse after eating it.it would be nice to send some Hushe seeds to a seed Bank to assure it's survival.by the way Aztecs used Cacao beans as money not just as food.when they drank chocolate they either prepare it with wild honey or with grounded roasted chillies.talk about hot chocolate.
    Last edited by distribuidorUSA; Nov 05, 2014 at 02:11 PM.

  11. #11
    mx
    May 2010
    873
    369 times
    I cannot speak to the taste of huaje, because I don't eat it. I assume it's another learned taste, just as little kids here eat roasted ants and grasshoppers like popcorn.

    But. they sell very well here, and they are used by the people who were born and raised here.

    Yes, I sure would like to see Hushe seeds in that storage place in the polar regions.

  12. #12
    mx
    May 2010
    873
    369 times
    When the huaje is harvested, the men climb the trees like monkeys. It concerns me to see a family man sitting up 20 or 30 feet in a thin tree.

    They usually cut off the branches the seed pods are on, with a machete. They fall to the ground, and perhaps the man's wife will strip the seed pods off the branches, then leave the branches to be added to the soil.

    Here they have enough value that people will pay my wife for the harvest rights to her trees, then they sell them at the market. Not a lot of money, but it gives them some money, which in tight economic times every peso counts. Poor Mexicans do not pass an opportunity to earn a peso. Families take care of each other, so if each person makes a bit every day they get by. And, studies show that the population of Mexico is the happiest nation in the world.
    Furness likes this.

  13. #13
    us
    Manuel

    Dec 2012
    Strathmore Ca
    Whites DFX.
    148
    33 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    My Mom used a long carrizo with a hook on the tip.to break free the Guaje bunchs.she was very handy at twisting the branches with it.anyways.how is your lead to the Aztec treasure going mr Bigfoot?.sooner or later Im gonna make some noice down there.I'll do some serious excavations.do you want to be there?.of course is not permited but Im thinking of going with HINA?.or whats the name of the mexican agency in charge of harcheological sites?.
    Last edited by distribuidorUSA; Nov 05, 2014 at 11:34 PM.

  14. #14
    mx
    May 2010
    873
    369 times
    Yes, they use that hook here. But, out trees are too tall and that method is too slow for getting large amounts. The women, such as your mom, who want just enough for a meal use the hook, though. Some of the pods are easy to break off, but some are very stiff, which is why the heroes go up with a machete.

    They use the same hook to take down avocadoes. My wife repeatedly asks me to stand underneath the avocado tree and catch avocadoes when they fall after she twists them off. I am not Stan Musial, and almost never actually manage to catch one.

    No, I have high risk aversion. If something is nominally illegal, but not enforced, I would be the first man in 100 years to go to prison for it. So, I don't.

    It is obvious that I have no more to do on the hidden treasure down the hill a few hundred yards. I spent years (not full time of course, but as information became available) looking for inconsistencies, and finally resolved them all.

    So, though I don't KNOW the treasure is there, there is at this time no other place it can be.

    All I can do is watch for new information to come out, and see if that new information precludes it being here. For example, someone in another place that belonged to the Moctezuma family in the Cortes era, with local oral tradition that says the treasure is there. But, as one man pointed out many months ago, most claims of hidden gold do not ever produce any gold. This one did.

    The other possibility is when the uncle dies his money grubbing, less than totally moral, son decides to take a look.

    And, I mustn't forget the possibility that Mexican government officials see these threads and use attorneys to locate me by IP, and invade the place.

    Notice I am not at all worried about someone "with a dream" busting in here and digging it up. As I have pointed out, that transcends reality.

    But, barring such possible events, there is nothing more to do but accept in my own heart the gold is there, and is totally unobtainable. "Accept that which you cannot change."

    I am actually delighted to think it is there and will be there forever. "I got a secret! I got a secret!"
    Last edited by piegrande; Nov 06, 2014 at 10:08 AM.

  15. #15
    us
    Manuel

    Dec 2012
    Strathmore Ca
    Whites DFX.
    148
    33 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    I really think the place I know is the mitical place of the seven caves.I know of six.so there's got to be one more somewhere in the area.the mountains are too rugged and is easy to miss a cave.

 

 
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