Welcome guest, is this your first visit?
Member
Discoveries
 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 18
Like Tree31Likes

Thread: How much gold was there 500 years ago?

« Prev Thread | Next Thread »
  1. #1
    mx
    May 2010
    873
    369 times

    How much gold was there 500 years ago?

    If I asked this question before, I apologize, and plead advanced senility.

    I have long wondered just what the supply of gold in Mexico looked like 500 years ago. Today, gold is awfully hard to find, and that seems to be true in most countries as well.

    But, was it that hard to find 500 years ago? The alleged treasure of Moctezuma was estimated to be as much as 20 tons of gold and jewels. Thinking in today's terms, that would have been an unbearable burden to find and dig up that much stuff. But, assume with me that before every square inch was searched, there might have been a lot of it easily obtained.

    The Aztecs had a tremendous labor pool. Not only were there great numbers of slaves. But, also the Tenochas would send out orders to the conquered tribes how much stuff was to be delivered as tribute every 80 days. Slaves; perfumes; miscellaneous. How the conquered tribes got the goodies was their problem. So, if gold were originally very plentiful, they could have decreed each tribe bring, oh, say, 10 pounds of gold each month. Remember this is a theoretical brain storm, not an evidence based theory.

    In the early days of the Gold Rush in the US, at times a lucky prospector would find hundreds of thousands of dollars of gold in a very short time, and in a small place. And, almost immediately, other people would dig beside and around and under the lode. And, in short time the easy gold would be gone, though sometimes more difficult mining processes would bring up more gold, but at greater expense. Today, I think they go down thousands of feet.

    That is what I am wondering happened when the Tenochas first started collecting gold. A lot of it in a hurry, then small quantities trickling in. So, more than one Emperor could have had a large treasure, and both theories, local burial, and long range transport to the north, could be correct.

    Remember, this posting is pure conjecture. No supporting evidence exists as far as I know.

    And, this does bring up a secondary question. Are there really large areas of the planet which have never had a human set foot on them? Maybe. Maybe not.

    When some of you are out there in the wilderness of New Mexico or Arizona, it must be easy to imagine you are going where no man has gone before. Yet, the photos posted here at times show signs of human activity.

  2. #2
    kcm
    kcm is offline
    us
    Feb 2016
    NW Minnesota
    Tesoro Silver uMax
    5,716
    6616 times
    Parts of the world still covered with ice may be prime areas for this sort of "untouched gold". Glaciers in Alaska and Canada still move lots of gold to this day. I haven't had satellite TV for some years now, but just before we terminated service, there was a show starting about folks going to Greenland looking for gold. As the ice recedes in the Arctic, various countries are all clamoring in, trying to claim up as much of the land as possible - not only for oil (primary resource), but also for gold and other minerals, as well as strategic land claims. There are even countries that are trying to "own" portions of Antarctica, even though it has long been agreed that the southern Polar Cap would not be "owned" or "claimed" by any country/group/company/person.

    As for your theory, it sounds very plausible to me - not that I'm a history buff, especially in that area!! But the Rocky Mountains extend down into Mexico. Likewise, there were other areas in Mexico that had gold. It makes sense that back before the industrial revolution, there just weren't the types of materials needed to recover very find gold or to process (or even dig for) hard rock lodes. So the only logical way that Egypt and other lost civilizations could have come across the volume of gold was to find it, steal it or both. ...But like you, I'm definitely no expert on the subject!! Just voicing my opinion. ....Seems like I might learn my lesson some day. -- -- -- NAH!!

  3. #3
    us
    Jul 2012
    San Antonio, Texas
    Garrett 250
    5,361
    3476 times
    Research/Limited field work
    Long story guys that can't be told here. Suggest online research on Mejica(mesheeka) true name of the Aztecs and where the name Mexico comes from. They were simply the last tribe to move down into the central valley of Mexico.(1200a.d. -1523 a.d. roughly) Riches had been found much earlier, but it would be the Spanish that will discover the great silver deposits that are supposed to last another 300-400 years. Funny story how it was discovered. Can't tell it here. Aztecs had a huge trading network so by trade,tribute and slaves they worked the mines they knew about. KCM is right, the Rockies extend down into Mexico as the Sierra Madre Oriental and the Sierra Madre Occidental. Eastern and Western mountains on both sides of the country. But Yaquis on the west and Chichimecas to the north and west. It would take the Spanish 50 years to defeat the chichimecas(Mixton War) and nobody ever defeated the Yaquis. They are still proud of that. But it will be the spanish who find and develop the great wealth. Just a short version of the history. The spanish asked the aztecs the name of the tribe to the north and west of the aztec capital. The Aztecs replied, those are the chichimecas. The spanish, being great record keepers, wrote it down. In nahuatl, language pf the Aztecs, it means "sons of dogs" or really "sons of Bi*****"
    I am a college history prof. which means I'm only about 75% full of crap...
    Last edited by austin; Apr 04, 2016 at 12:07 AM.

  4. #4
    kcm
    kcm is offline
    us
    Feb 2016
    NW Minnesota
    Tesoro Silver uMax
    5,716
    6616 times
    Hey Austin - yeah, about 25% of what you just wrote was (for me) in another language! ...At least I got the part about the Rockies right!!

  5. #5
    us
    Feb 2011
    Lakeland, Florida
    456
    691 times
    Well just an example of an exhaustible supply, and those who find it. Part of the year I'm on a post out in the corn field, there is corn as far as I can see.
    The crows have a field day, along with the raccoons and deer. It's so easy to get to the corn. But eventually comes harvest time and after that it's slim pickings.
    They have to work hard to find anything the harvester didn't get. So too I would think would be the same with gold. At first there was a lot of it around to get, but after hundreds of years, you are mostly looking for what the harvester missed.

    At least with the corn it's back in abundance, year after year.
    The Scarecrow sees all and tells none.

  6. #6
    kcm
    kcm is offline
    us
    Feb 2016
    NW Minnesota
    Tesoro Silver uMax
    5,716
    6616 times
    "Part of the year I'm on a post out in the corn field, ..."
    A real, live SCARECROW??


    ....and then I notice this: "The Scarecrow sees all and tells none."

  7. #7
    mx
    May 2010
    873
    369 times
    Exactly what I am talking about, Doc. It was plentiful; now it isn't. But, my concern was that the Emperors might have had a great amount of it, more than one Emperor might have had a mighty treasure. Thanks for the perfect example.

  8. #8
    ec
    May 2013
    Ecuador, America
    1,575
    2130 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Consider that along streams and rivers, it is always changing……the sides along are always falling in, eroding, uncovering…..the mountains feeding the streams are eroding……..no, there is always more uncovered…….

  9. #9
    mx
    Nov 2004
    Alamos,Sonora,Mexico
    14,603
    11777 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Morning Austin, Te Mexican gov't did conquer the Yaqui. In their last treaty the gov't demanded that they have schools and attend them, whereupon the younger Yauis learned just how big Mexico was and just how small the Tribal lands - the Bacatetes were and the difference in population and they haven't had any serious trouble since.
    Simon1, piegrande and Mackaydon like this.
    "I exist to live, not live to exist"

  10. #10
    mx
    Nov 2004
    Alamos,Sonora,Mexico
    14,603
    11777 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Doc, very true, but at what rate ?
    Simon1 and doc-d like this.
    "I exist to live, not live to exist"

  11. #11
    kcm
    kcm is offline
    us
    Feb 2016
    NW Minnesota
    Tesoro Silver uMax
    5,716
    6616 times
    Depends on lots of thins - namely, I suppose, would be type of soil and severity of floods. I live in flatland, but we get flooding every Spring. The ground is ALL rich, black dirt and silt, and there are always lots of trees that end up being undercut by the water and falling in. Also read recently about an area on the West Coast (I think in California, but maybe north) where a large area in mostly rocky terrain ended up taking a nosedive. There was talk about how this kind of thing was natural and how dredging shouldn't be banned, etc. So we know it happens pretty much everywhere. But at what rate? That's a very good question! ...Not even sure why I'm spouting off on the subject.

  12. #12
    ec
    May 2013
    Ecuador, America
    1,575
    2130 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Don Jose……..how much…..at least with some of the streams/rivers here, like the Rio Oro (why did they name it that)………huge amounts…..boulders the size of cars (or larger) thrown about……banks in many areas composed of gravel……...

  13. #13
    mx
    Nov 2004
    Alamos,Sonora,Mexico
    14,603
    11777 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Very true Doc, but how many situations were like that ?
    doc-d likes this.
    "I exist to live, not live to exist"

  14. #14
    ec
    May 2013
    Ecuador, America
    1,575
    2130 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    How many exist……..no idea; BUT the point is there is always "new" gold being uncovered, moved……
    Moving water aside, gold operations with mines extracting gold, gold operations digging up earth and sorting it out to extract the gold……
    No, it seems to me thee is plenty of gold, people need to research, to explore, and to work to get it.

  15. #15
    mx
    Nov 2004
    Alamos,Sonora,Mexico
    14,603
    11777 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    true doc, rich workable placers are generally worked out as is their source. sometimes rather quickly. I am referring to the Indians' ability to recover the gold

    But you ate right, as the mts are worn down new gold deposits are uncovered..
    "I exist to live, not live to exist"

 

 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Remove Ads

Home | Forum | Active Topics | What's New

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 46
    Last Post: Oct 20, 2015, 02:50 PM
  2. Replies: 84
    Last Post: Aug 09, 2013, 03:40 PM
  3. Gold drought is over! First gold in over 5 years
    By Tenspeed in forum Today's Finds!
    Replies: 31
    Last Post: Jul 16, 2013, 10:36 AM
  4. [HONORABLE MENTION] GOLD CLASS RING MISSING 6 YEARS RETURNED!!! 12G 10K YELLOW GOLD!!!
    By stringfrenzy in forum Honorable Mention
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Jun 17, 2013, 03:05 PM
  5. [HONORABLE MENTION] GOLD CLASS RING MISSING 6 YEARS RETURNED!!! 12G 10K YELLOW GOLD!!!
    By stringfrenzy in forum Today's Finds!
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: Jun 17, 2013, 01:02 PM
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.3.0