Welcome guest, is this your first visit?
Member
Discoveries
 
Page 14 of 22 FirstFirst ... 4 12 13 14 15 16 ... LastLast
Results 196 to 210 of 329
  1. #196

    Aug 2004
    1,341
    13 times

    Re: CPTBIL's mention of Aztec pictographs in SE Arizona

    Dear cactusjumper;
    Everything is simply wonderful with me, my friend. To continue on with DNA for just a bit, it's a very exciting field of study in that DNA is the very blueprint of life on Earth. The beautiful thing about DNA is that it's almost as old as the Earth itself and in light of this fact, and also the fact that DNA can be MAPPED, it's an absolutely wonderful window into past life forms on our planet. The Earth is approximately 4.5 billion years old and DNA is about 4.2 billion years old, therefore DNA can be assumed to be the oldest studiable component of living organisms on our planet.

    Unraveling the DNA code can possibly tell us how life existed and more importantly, how life became extinct. Extinction is such a little known facet of scientific endeavor at the moment, and it's only within the last decade that science has taken a hard look at WHY certain species become extinct. Also, DNA can possibly tell us about life outside of our own Solar system. All in all, it's a fascinating field of endeavor and I try to follow closely DNA studies as they pertain to historical developments of life forms very closely.
    Your friend;
    LAMAR

  2. #197
    Charter Member

    Dec 2005
    Arizona
    5,795
    1048 times

    Re: CPTBIL's mention of Aztec pictographs in SE Arizona

    Lamar,

    I don't really disagree with anything you wrote. It is a very exciting field and something I also keep an eye on.........from a safe distance. I fear that getting too involved in the nuts and bolts of the scientific process, might just cause my head to explode.
    Leaving that part of the study to folks like yourself , seems like the prudent thing to do.

    I prefer to read the results, without feeling the need to qualify the paths that were traveled to reach the final conclusions. Believe me, I have a hard enough time just trying to stay ahead of pip's theories.

    Take care,

    Joe

  3. #198
    Charter Member

    Dec 2005
    Arizona
    5,795
    1048 times

    Re: CPTBIL's mention of Aztec pictographs in SE Arizona

    Roy,

    I trust you and Beth are enjoying the warmer weather.

    You are working way too many hours, my friend. Of course, any work is too much.

    Getting back to lithics, and something I can personally relate to, it's hard for me to accept at face value all of the blades, points and tools that are found at the ka-billion archaeological sites as authentic......to the sites.

    Speaking from personal experience, I have a hard time discarding any knife/weapon or tool. When you consider that I didn't actually make it, and that my life and sustenance don't really depend on them, I have difficulty with the plethora of such artifacts found laying around in the various sites.

    Fine points and tools did not come easily in those days, and each one would have been a treasured possession........not to be misplace or treated in a careless manner. I would think they would take on a spiritual life of their own, to the owners. In a number of early cultures women were not allowed to even touch many of those items.

    I would compare many of these finds to a Knight leaving for battle and forgetting to bring along his horse. In many cases, they took such things with them, even into the next world.

    All archaeologists live for the day when they will be the ones to make a historical, career-making, discovery. Some have been known to make claims that far overreached their conclusions. Others have been found to have presented pure hoaxes as the real thing.

    Many finds in other parts of the world would not be considered authenticated here. As in the Hobbits, they seem to make some pretty huge leaps of logic to reach the conclusions......they were looking for. We can thank people like Ales Hrdlicka for requiring more stringent, connecting, artifacts to establish historical "fact". IMHO, that connectivity is pretty slim with the Flores Island site.

    Too many non-cultural artifacts are possibly mixed into the soil to be able to make definitive statements. That is one of the major problems that archaeologists are faced with. That is particularly true in Alaska and Siberia where dating such artifacts is iffy at best. Attaching them to a specific culture is usually guesswork.

    As anyone can see, most of the above is my personal opinion and not worth one hell of a lot. I am witting this from our store, so I have no reference material to site.

    Hope to see you back posting soon.

    Best to you both,

    Joe

  4. #199
    Charter Member

    Dec 2005
    Arizona
    5,795
    1048 times

    Re: CPTBIL's mention of Aztec pictographs in SE Arizona

    More Hobbit:

    Public release date: 21-Aug-2006
    [ Print Article | E-mail Article | Close Window ]

    Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
    aem1@psu.edu
    814-865-9481
    Penn State

    No hobbits in this shire
    PLEASE NOTE: The embargo for this release has been lifted.
    The skeletal remains found in a cave on the island of Flores, Indonesia, reported in 2004, do not represent a new species as then claimed, but some of the ancestors of modern human pygmies who live on the island today, according to an international scientific team.

    The researchers also demonstrate that the fairly complete skeleton designated LB1 is microcephalic, while other remains excavated from the site share LB1's small stature but show no evidence of microcephaly, since no other brain cases are known. Microcephaly is a condition in which the head and brain are much smaller than average for the person's age and gender. It can be present at birth or develop afterwards and is associated with a complex of other growth and skeletal anomalies.

    "Our work documents the real dimensions of human variation here," says Dr. Robert B. Eckhardt, professor of developmental genetics and evolutionary morphology, department of kinesiology, Penn State. He notes that "LB1 looks different if researchers think in terms of European characteristics because it samples a population that is not European, but Australomelanesian, and further because it is a developmentally abnormal individual, being microcephalic."

    Teuku Jacob, laboratory of bioanthropology and paleoanthropology, Gadjah Mada University, Indonesia, was granted permission to study the original bones by Radien P. Soejono, National Archaeological Research Center, Jakarta, Indonesia. The analysis by Jacob's full research team, including Eckhardt and others mentioned below, demonstrates that claims of a new species – "Homo floresiensis" -- commonly called hobbits, are incorrect.

    Jacob and colleagues found four major areas of evidence where the 2004 evaluation was wrong: geographical factors, craniofacial asymmetry, dental traits, and postcranial abnormalities. They discuss these areas in today's (Aug 21) online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

    Those proposing a separate species had claimed that early human ancestors, Homo erectus, traveled to the island about 840 thousand years ago and evolved into "Homo floresiensis," based on the discovery of stone tools on the island. This claim assumed that there was no subsequent human migration to the island until after "Homo floresiensis" died out about 15,000 years ago. Jacob and colleagues contend this is false since pygmy elephants (Stegodon) arrived on the island at least two separate times, and during periods of low sea levels Flores was isolated from other islands by only a few kilometers, as shown by K. Hsü, National Institute of Earth Sciences, Beijing. Repeated influxes by later humans were not only possible, but likely.

    For LB1'S cranium, face, dentition, skeleton, they find that many of the key features previously said to be diagnostic of a new species still are present in the Rampasasa pygmies on the island today, along with evidence for growth abnormalities.

    One error made in the earlier proposal of a new species was that "comparisons of LB1 were made mostly with Homo sapiens from other geographic areas of the world, principally Europe," the researchers note. "Yet it would have been logical even for a supposedly novel human species from the Australomelanesian region to have been compared with other human populations, present as well as past, from that region," they added.

    "To establish a new species, paleoanthropologists are required to document a unique complex of normal traits not found in any other species," says Eckhardt. "But this was not done. The normal traits of LB1 were not unique, and its unusually small braincase was not normal."

    To study LB1's traits, 94 cranial features and 46 features of its mandible were compared to values for modern humans. All fell within the normal range of variation for Australomelanesians. Two anatomical details, particular grooves in the cranial base singled out as "not seen in modern humans," in the 2004 new species announcement are, according to Alan Thorne, archaeology and natural history, Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies, Australian National University, Canberra, commonly found in Australian and Tasmanian crania.

    Dental configuration also can be used to designate a new species. The original researchers argued that a CT scan showed the absence of a third molar and that there was some atypical positioning of other teeth. However, Maciej Henneberg, anatomical sciences, University of Adelaide, Australia and Etty Indriati, laboratory of bioanthroplogy and paleoanthropology, Gadjah Mada University, found an existing socket and a tooth fragment in the space where the molar supposedly was missing. The unusually positioned teeth were there, but such teeth also are found in a sample of Rampasasa pygmies who still live on Flores.

    LB1 is short in stature and has a small brain, but rather than a sign of a new species, the researchers consider this to represent microcephaly. The ratios of LB1's cranial capacity and stature are similar to ratios found over several generations in some 20th-Century families of microcephalics.

    Understanding normal biological development may be the key to showing that LB1 really is pathological. Of 184 syndromes that include microcephaly, 57 also include short stature; some also include facial asymmetry and dental anomalies. Henneberg notes that "while we do not in this paper diagnose the specific syndrome present, many characteristics point to an abnormal developmental disorder."

    To visualize the facial asymmetry, David W. Frayer, professor, department of anthropology, University of Kansas, composed split photographs of LB1's face, combining two left or two right sides as composite faces. The dissimilarities from the original face and between the two left or right composites were striking. To quantify these differences the researchers compared left and right side measurements on the original face.

    "I was looking for a standard of how much asymmetry was normal and eventually found a review article covering dozens of papers, some published nearly a century ago in England's prestigious Galton Laboratory" says Eckhardt. "While most faces are not perfectly symmetrical, asymmetry of the facial skeleton that exceeds about 1 percent is unusual."

    He and Adam J. Kuperavage, graduate student, kinesiology, Penn State, found that six of seven measurements were larger on LB1's right side by as much as 40 percent, while the seventh was 6 percent larger on the left. LB1's craniofacial asymmetry indicates that this individual was not developmentally normal.

    Another supposed indication of a new species was the unusual robustness of the leg bones. "CT scans show that the cortex, the outer solid bone, is very thin, not robust at all," says Henneberg. "The bone is thin and straight. The attachment of the muscles suggests muscle paralysis."

    Eckhardt found that the low degree of humeral torsion – twisting of the upper arm bone between the shoulder and elbow – also was not a sign of a new species, but of developmental problems. The normal humeral torsion for a human is about 142 degrees, but LB1 has only 110 degrees of torsion. However, humeral torsion is influenced by both genetic and developmental factors, with about two thirds coming from inherited programming and one third from use. With disuse, torsion is usually only about 110 degrees. Both humeral torsion in the arm and the muscle markings on the femur and tibia in the leg indicate an individual with movement disabilities.

    While other skeleton parts were found with LB1 in the same cave, no other cranial parts attributed to this population were unearthed and LB1 is the only reasonably complete skeleton.

    The researchers conclude that "The LB1 individual exhibits a combination of characteristics that are not primitive but instead regional, not unique but found in other modern human populations, particularly some still living on Flores, and not derived but strikingly disordered developmentally."

    "LB1 is not a normal member of a new species, but an abnormal member of our own," says Eckhardt.
    __________________________________________________ ___________

    Like I wrote, it's a little early for conclusive statements about this find.

    Joe Ribaudo

  5. #200
    um
    Nemo me impune lacesset

    Jan 2005
    DAKOTA TERRITORY
    Tesoro Lobo Supertraq, (95%) Garrett Scorpion (5%)
    5,783
    1894 times

    Re: CPTBIL's mention of Aztec pictographs in SE Arizona

    HOLA amigos,

    Very interesting posts! I want to address a few points, starting with this:

    Lamar wrote:
    The beautiful thing about DNA is that it's almost as old as the Earth itself and in light of this fact, and also the fact that DNA can be MAPPED, it's an absolutely wonderful window into past life forms on our planet. The Earth is approximately 4.5 billion years old and DNA is about 4.2 billion years old, therefore DNA can be assumed to be the oldest studiable component of living organisms on our planet.
    Without taking issue with your dates, this would mean that DNA came into being only about 300 million (0.3 billion) years after Earth came into being, which is pretty astonishing if you think about it, since the Earth should have been far too HOT for anything to be able to live on it. I know that recent studies (NASA for one) have proposed that Earth cooled down very fast after the collision between 'proto-Earth' and a Mars-sized planet (which collision, they propose, caused the tilt in our axis and our Moon being born from the resulting debris) so .....When did Earth cool to the point where life might form on it, or arrive on it?
    Thank you in advance.

    Cactusjumper (Joe) wrote
    Roy,

    I trust you and Beth are enjoying the warmer weather.

    You are working way too many hours, my friend. Of course, any work is too much.
    The warmer weather is very welcome here - keep sending the warm weather north amigo! I agree on the work schedule too - hopefully soon there will be more "free time" and we can get an actual roof on the cabin. (I expect the daily rainstorms will then change into a prolonged drought.) I hope you folks are doing well.

    Cactusjumper also wrote
    Getting back to lithics, and something I can personally relate to, it's hard for me to accept at face value all of the blades, points and tools that are found at the ka-billion archaeological sites as authentic......to the sites.

    Speaking from personal experience, I have a hard time discarding any knife/weapon or tool.
    Perhaps our "values" we place on our tools and possessions are a fairly modern and/or cultural factor? Some rather primitive tribes do not attach much value to their tools, possessions, even homes - and will freely abandon them for no other reason than it is a simple thing to make new tools, a new shelter etc. Also, it is thought that at least SOME of these finds of blades, points etc are not something simply lost or abandoned but were a sort of "votive offering" left by the former owner(s) who may have purposefully created and or purchased the artifacts solely for the purpose of burying them for "the gods" or ancestors etc. Not all sites are "rich" in artifacts, for example at least two of our local Folsum sites (one here in SD, one nearby in WY) have very little in the way of artifacts, only a couple of broken points were found (in animal remains) that alllowed the archaeologists to even identify what culture had used them. Both were "klll" sites, where huge numbers of bison were run off escarpments or cliffs. I am not disagreeing with you in entirety, just saying that in at least SOME cases the finding of artifacts could be reasonably explained or were not as "plentiful" in artifacts as some commonly think.

    Cactusjumper also wrote
    "LB1 is not a normal member of a new species, but an abnormal member of our own," says Eckhardt.
    Thank you for posting the whole article amigo. While this seems conclusive, I recall another study recently done in which castings were taken of the brain case, and compared with microcephalic and normal brain case casts; that study concluded that the 'Hobbits' could not have been microcephalic homo sapiens, due to the large differences. In fact the brain cast did not resemble the normal homo sapiens sapiens either, but most closely resembled homo erectus. <extract>

    06.01. Critics Silenced By Scans Of Hobbit Skull , Nature News Excerpts: Virtual skull of the 'hobbit', with its brain cavity highlighted. ? Kirk E. Smith Comparisons with pygmies and chimps bolster new species claim. A computer-generated model of the skull of Homo floresiensis, our diminutive human relative, confirms that the controversial specimens from Indonesia do indeed represent a new species. The study of the creature's brainpan shows that it was neither a pygmy nor an individual with a malformed skull and brain, as some critics contend. This lends support to the discovery team's assertion that the metre-tall specimen belongs to a species distinct from Homo erectus. * Critics Silenced By Scans Of Hobbit Skull, Rex Dalton , 05/03/03, Nature News __________________________________________________ _______________ 06.02. The Brain of LB1, Homo floresiensis , Science Excerpts: The brain of Homo floresiensis is assessed by comparing a virtual endocast from the type specimen (LB1) with endocasts from great apes, Homo erectus, Homo sapiens, a human pygmy, a human microcephalic, Sts 5 (...) and WT 17000 (...). (...) data indicate that LB1 is not a microcephalic or pygmy. LB1's brain size versus body size scales like an australopithecine, but its endocast shape resembles that of Homo erectus. LB1 has derived frontal and temporal lobes (...), which are consistent with capabilities for higher cognitive processing. * The Brain of LB1, Homo floresiensis, Dean Falk , Charles Hildebolt , Kirk Smith , Mike J. Morwood , Thomas Sutikna , Peter Brown , Jatmiko , E. Wayhu Saptomo , Barry Brunsden , Fred Prior , 05/03/03, DOI: 10.1126/science.1109727, Science
    <end extract, not sure if these are available online>
    Cactusjumper also wrote
    Like I wrote, it's a little early for conclusive statement about this find.
    All too true amigo!
    I look forward to your reply and would love to hear from everyone on this, thank you in advance,
    Roy ~ Oroblanco

    SUPPORT THE BEEF INDUSTRY - EAT BEEF
    "We must find a way, or we will make one."--Hannibal Barca

  6. #201
    Charter Member

    Dec 2005
    Arizona
    5,795
    1048 times

    Re: CPTBIL's mention of Aztec pictographs in SE Arizona

    Hi Roy,

    The dueling points on the genetic makeup of the Hobbits illustrates, clearly, that it is way too early for conclusions......carved in stone, so to speak. Because the article I posted, basically, said the same thing I have been saying all along........I naturally agree with everything in the article.

    In reading "Beyond The Last Village" by Alan Rabinowitz, I was struck by the similarities between the Pygmies of the Adung Wang Valley and our Hobbits. While they are somewhat dissimilar in their overall physical makeup, their histories may have run a parallel course.

    As for the viability of the lithic artifacts that are found, most of them can't actually be discounted as being noncultural alterations of natural rock formations. That also holds true for bone tools and projectile points. Obviously, many of these artifacts are man made, but many American archaeological sites remain clouded by questions.

    We briefly touched on the possibilities of a historical connection between the Solutrean Culture and Clovis. If we are using Sandia points to make that connection, the technologies are different. I am not sure the Solutrean comparison was made outside of the Sandia Cave site.

    At this point, I will be more than happy to follow the conversation wherever you want to take it. I doubt I will be able to keep up, but I expect to have a fine time trying.

    Take care,

    Joe

  7. #202
    mx
    Nov 2004
    Alamos,Sonora,Mexico
    11,495
    2984 times

    Re: CPTBIL's mention of Aztec pictographs in SE Arizona

    Good evening Beth and the hairy one:

    First, this brings to mind my little ones of the Yaqui and the two setlements near Guiracoba.: they were of approx. 1 meter in height

    Second, the 9 ft ones near hee.

    Third, have you ever received any of my em's Roy?.

    Fourth, I have opened a discusions with a few in The Explorers club on the origin of the Aztecs and Atlantis. It is still intriguing to compare the phonetic sound of Azatlan / Atlantis, too close to be a causal thing.

    Don Jose de La Mancha
    "I exist to live, not live to exist"

  8. #203
    Charter Member

    Dec 2005
    Arizona
    5,795
    1048 times

    Re: CPTBIL's mention of Aztec pictographs in SE Arizona

    Don Jose,

    Nice to see you posting in this neck of the woods again. Speaking of woods, perhaps the phonetic similarity between Atlantis, "Azatlan" and The Tree Of Heaven is also too close to be casual. There are also the Atlantids associated with Aztec archaeology. Going back a little farther you can throw the daughters of Atlas into the phonetic mix.

    All kidding aside, it would be very interesting to hear the results of your discussions.

    Take care,

    Joe

  9. #204
    mx
    Nov 2004
    Alamos,Sonora,Mexico
    11,495
    2984 times

    Re: CPTBIL's mention of Aztec pictographs in SE Arizona

    Joe, if it is con, do you honestly espect ' me' to post that ? snicker.

    AZTLAN = AZLANTIS surrender you, you, hmm, lost Dutchman you .

    Don Jose de La Mancha

    p.s. "when is the LDM to be held this year?
    "I exist to live, not live to exist"

  10. #205
    Charter Member

    Dec 2005
    Arizona
    5,795
    1048 times

    Re: CPTBIL's mention of Aztec pictographs in SE Arizona

    Don Jose,

    I would expect you would post any speculation, sans facts, pro or con. Generating debate or conversation is, I assume, why you announced what you were doing.

    I have never heard of any Pygmy tribes in Mexico. Can you tell us the tribal names of the Guiracoba people? South America is another story. My knowledge of Mexico is minimal, so it's no surprise I have never heard of Mexican Pygmies. I would love to hear more details.

    Thanks for your reply,

    Joe

  11. #206
    um
    Nemo me impune lacesset

    Jan 2005
    DAKOTA TERRITORY
    Tesoro Lobo Supertraq, (95%) Garrett Scorpion (5%)
    5,783
    1894 times

    Re: CPTBIL's mention of Aztec pictographs in SE Arizona

    Greetings Joe (and HOLA amigos)!

    Cactusjumper wrote
    At this point, I will be more than happy to follow the conversation wherever you want to take it. I doubt I will be able to keep up, but I expect to have a fine time trying.
    I fear that I have drifted pretty far afield, on the thinnest of connections. You would surely be able to 'keep up' on any level, at least any level I could talk on! To try to swing back onto track, let me go back to the lithics.

    Why are Clovis artifacts found where they are, and not to the south? Surely there were mammoths living in the south right? Was there another culture that "blocked" any expansion in that direction? Most historians say that Clovis people were never numerous, and the whole population of the Americas could not have been so high as to lead to conflicts over hunting grounds, right? With the microblade tech cultures, we have a POSSIBLE explanation as to why they did not expand south with their unique technology - (a huge glacier) but surely there was no glacier running across Mexico? Thank you in advance.

    Don Jose', Dueno de Real y Minas de Tayopa wrote
    Good evening Beth and the hairy one:

    First, this brings to mind my little ones of the Yaqui and the two setlements near Guiracoba.: they were of approx. 1 meter in height

    Second, the 9 ft ones near hee.

    Third, have you ever received any of my em's Roy?.

    Fourth, I have opened a discusions with a few in The Explorers club on the origin of the Aztecs and Atlantis. It is still intriguing to compare the phonetic sound of Azatlan / Atlantis, too close to be a causal thing.
    HOLA amigo - I would be very interested to hear more of both the little people of the Yaqui and the tall ones. The small people in particular may have a linkage to this part of the country; for instance, the finding of tiny mummies over in Wyoming, one a man who stood 18 inches tall and the other even shorter. (I believe the 18 inch man was called "Pedro" - care to guess why?) The Shoshoni and Arapahoes have legends of little people who lived in the mountains, who used tiny bows and arrows with poisoned tips, and were strong enough to carry a full-grown deer on their backs. Pure legend, or some connection with our 'Hobbits'? If a land bridge would allow mammoths to walk from Asia to America, and the "first" Americans, would it not also suffice for tiny people aka 'Hobbits'? Thank you in advance.

    *Side note here, I know that one explanation for Pedro is that he was a victim of microcephaly, which is debatable. His skull was certainly not what I would consider "normal" yet it is not a perfect match with a classic microcephaly case either. If it were a simple case of microcephaly - why the strange mummification and cave burial, hardly consistent with any known Amerindian culture of this part of the country?

    Next - yes I received several, and sent at least three replies. I take it that you have not received any of my replies? Let me know and I will see if I have copies to resend, or I will just write a new reply.

    Last - I would love to hear how that discussion is progressing, whether pro or con.

    Joe - I too was surprised to learn that pygmies have lived in America, at least in ancient times. It is another "taboo" subject among American historians but there is evidence of pygmy peoples, in Tennessee for example. Here is a brief bit
    http://www.science-frontiers.com/sf084/sf084a02.htm
    NYT article
    http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive...B566838D669FDE

    Little people of Wyoming
    http://www.legendsofamerica.com/WY-LittlePeople.html
    Pedro
    http://www.anomalies-unlimited.com/Pedro.html
    <Seems gold prospectors tend to run across the strangest things...

    EDIT correction, I thought that Pedro stood 18 inches tall, according to this site he stood 14 inches tall. Pretty short even for pygmies. (Too much Sun, wind, rain on the old noggin lately I guess! Can't find my prospectors hat, starting to need it too. Hey a poor excuse is better than none right? heh heh)


    I look forward to your replies,
    Roy ~ Oroblanco
    SUPPORT THE BEEF INDUSTRY - EAT BEEF
    "We must find a way, or we will make one."--Hannibal Barca

  12. #207
    Charter Member

    Dec 2005
    Arizona
    5,795
    1048 times

    Re: CPTBIL's mention of Aztec pictographs in SE Arizona

    Hello Roy,

    "Why are Clovis artifacts found where they are, and not to the south? Surely there were mammoths living in the south right? Was there another culture that "blocked" any expansion in that direction? Most historians say that Clovis people were never numerous, and the whole population of the Americas could not have been so high as to lead to conflicts over hunting grounds, right? With the microblade tech cultures, we have a POSSIBLE explanation as to why they did not expand south with their unique technology - (a huge glacier) but surely there was no glacier running across Mexico?"

    I doubt anyone can say for sure, but it seems more than possible that the Clovis people came from the south and developed their unique projectile points around the same time that they reached the area of Clovis, NM. As I understand it, their culture did not really last all that long, running out with the mammoth. Perhaps they had good reasons for not returning to the south. Perhaps time just ran out for them.

    While the ice may not have covered Mexico during the last ice age, it did leave it arid and inhospitable. That was possibly as large of a barrier as any glacier. I believe the people were pushed into the land of the Olmec.

    Have a good night.

    Joe

  13. #208
    mx
    Nov 2004
    Alamos,Sonora,Mexico
    11,495
    2984 times

    Re: CPTBIL's mention of Aztec pictographs in SE Arizona

    Guten tag mein herrr Joe: There are the remains of two centers on top of two mesas of difficult access. However they had different types of living habits. One constructed their buildings of adobe, the other of rock and adobe.

    When I first visited them, some of the ruins were still quite obvious, now?? The roofs were estimated to have been of such height that a normal man could put his elbow on top, and the scattered small stone utensils were scaled to a people of approx. one meter.

    I had the people gather whatever they could easily find and bury them in the floor of the best remaining building. The authorities were notified but, like my giant aquatic serpent, no obvious action has ever taken place. The same goes for the giants who are buried in the caves on the cerro de La Campana.

    Also when I was livng with the Yaqui, they told me of their legends of the original Yaqui being only one meter tall, and of the
    Yo-obwa which preyed upon them..

    One Christmas I found a large cardboard box with my name under the tree. I opened it and found another box. I opened that and found another and on until I finally opened the last one. In there I found a complete Human skull with the classic deformed forehead .

    There happened to be a husband & Wife team from the University of Michagan here investigating other cultures. I took the skull to them. They were fascinated and took many, many pictures of it. I suggested that they take it back with them, but they said, "no way, they would be barred from returning to Mexico if they removed anything". They then proceeded to tell me that it was from a young female of about 22 years of age, and had, had two children. They also stated there was NO known flat head culture of this type known any where within thousands of miles.

    All of this, including the small pyramid in the Quintana Roo jungles next to the Present Belize that my partner and I found, have been reported with no action or even acknowledgement, so I have just stopped bothering.

    Names? nope "de don got no stinkin names". --yet.

    Don Jose de La Mancha
    "I exist to live, not live to exist"

  14. #209
    mx
    Nov 2004
    Alamos,Sonora,Mexico
    11,495
    2984 times

    Re: CPTBIL's mention of Aztec pictographs in SE Arizona

    HI mi sheep luvin buddy and BETH: Nope, I have never received an em from you. I suggest that you send me one to be sure that we have actual communication, we have many things to talk over. Joe will be made privy of them later.

    Don Jose de La Mancha

    Real_Tayopa@hotmail.com
    "I exist to live, not live to exist"

  15. #210
    Charter Member

    Dec 2005
    Arizona
    5,795
    1048 times

    Re: CPTBIL's mention of Aztec pictographs in SE Arizona

    Don Jose,

    Legends of "little people" exist around the world. Some of those legends are based in reality.......perhaps many. The Yaqui have many myths and legends, and the story of the Surem is their version of the "little people". Like all of the other myths and legends from other parts of the world, their story is fascinating.

    Take care,

    Joe

 

 
Page 14 of 22 FirstFirst ... 4 12 13 14 15 16 ... LastLast

Home | Forum | Active Topics | What's New

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

ancient aztec pictographs
,
ancient celtic cave pictographs arizona
,
aztec pictograph
,

aztec pictographs

,
clovis people
,
north dakota pictographs
,
southeast oregon, aztec pictographs
,
spotted horse pictographs
,
the aztec pictographs
,
treasure hunter pictographs
Click on a term to search for related topics.
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.1.3