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Thread: ENGLISH WORD IMPROVISE AND STAMPEDING FOUND USED IN NEW ORLEANS BEFORE 1820

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  1. #31
    us
    Jack

    Jan 2015
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rebel - KGC View Post
    Do YOU know ANYONE with Alzheimers...? YOU may get it one day, TOO!
    Don't cast no spells on me, Dum

  2. #32
    us
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    Bible and Decoding Beale Cipher
    Quote Originally Posted by Cryptography View Post
    Don't cast no spells on me, Dum
    Don't leg that guy get you down crypto, he just has no clue what he is doing Bro

  3. #33

    Jun 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cryptography View Post
    Don't cast no spells on me, Dum
    Heh...
    Last edited by Rebel - KGC; Feb 26, 2016 at 07:18 PM.

  4. #34

    Jun 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jean Laf View Post
    Don't leg that guy get you down crypto, he just has no clue what he is doing Bro
    Heh... how ya been feeling, lately...?

  5. #35
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    Bible and Decoding Beale Cipher
    Quote Originally Posted by Rebel - KGC View Post
    Heh... how ya been feeling, lately...?
    Feeling like I need some Tacos !

  6. #36
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    Bible and Decoding Beale Cipher
    Quote Originally Posted by Jean Laf View Post
    Feeling like I need some Tacos !

    Click image for larger version. 

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  7. #37

    Jun 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jean Laf View Post
    Feeling like I need some Tacos !
    LOL!

  8. #38
    us
    Rev

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    Bible and Decoding Beale Cipher
    The Beale letters to Morriss also contain several English words, such as "improvise", not otherwise recorded before the 1840s in English, but from French improvisation used from 1786 New Orleans area and "stampede" Spanish, "an uproar, from estamper Beale's "stampeding" apparently first appears in print in the English Language before 1883, but were used from 1786-1820 in New Orleans in French and Spanish .

    These items are some of what the Hoax Folks use as proof the Beale Papers are not real . The two words are suppose to be only used in and after the 1885's, oops shot that boat out from underneath there seat .

    As for the other questions these folks keep coming up with, they will never be satisfied even if you dug up the treasure and put it on there door stoop . They are sticking there fingers in there ears and stopping there feet just at the mention of it . Haters going to do what haters do . I will pick out the next week link in there argument and we will expose them for what it is worth .

  9. #39
    us
    Rev

    Dec 2014
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    Bible and Decoding Beale Cipher
    I am not targeting the posters here, just using the Beale Ciphers Wikipedia Truth or Hoax section as my target !


    There has been considerable debate over whether the remaining two ciphertexts are real or hoaxes. An early researcher, Carl Hammer of Sperry UNIVAC,[5] used supercomputers of the late 1960s to analyze the ciphers and found that while the ciphers were poorly encoded, the two undeciphered ones did not show the patterns one would expect of randomly chosen numbers and probably encoded an intelligible text.[6] Other questions remain about the authenticity of the pamphlet's account. In 1934, Dr. Clarence Williams, a researcher at the Library of Congress, said, "To me, the pamphlet story has all the earmarks of a fake . . . [There was] no evidence save the word of the unknown author of the pamphlet that he ever had the papers."

    The pamphlet's background story has several implausibilities, and is based almost entirely on circumstantial evidence and hearsay.

    Later cryptographers have claimed that the two remaining ciphertexts have statistical characteristics which suggest that they are not actually encryptions of an English plaintext.[7][8] Alphabetical sequences such as abfdefghiijklmmnohpp are both non-random, as indicated by Carl Hammer,[6] and not words in English.

    Others have also questioned why Beale would have bothered writing three different ciphertexts (with at least two keys, if not ciphers) for what is essentially a single message in the first place,[9] particularly if he wanted to ensure that the next of kin received their share (as it is, with the treasure described, there is no incentive to decode the third cipher).[6]

    Analysis of the language used by the author of the pamphlet (the uses of punctuation, relative clauses, infinitives, conjunctives, and so on) has detected significant correlations between it and Beale's letters, including the plaintext of the second cipher, suggesting that they may have been written by the same person.[1]

    The letters also contain several English words, such as "improvise", not otherwise recorded before the 1820s in The New Monthly Magazine and Literary Journal, Volume 12 in English, but from French improvisation used from 1786 New Orleans area and "stampede" Spanish, "an uproar," from estamper "1823 (intransitive); Beale's "stampeding" apparently first appears in print in the English Language in 1832, in Etiquette, the American Code of Manners, but were used from 1786-1823 in New Orleans in French and Spanish.[1]

    The second message, describing the treasure, has been deciphered, but the others have not, suggesting a deliberate ploy to encourage interest in deciphering the other two texts only to discover that they are hoaxes. In addition, the original sale price of the pamphlet, 50 cents, was a high price for the time (adjusted for inflation, it is equivalent to $13.17 today[10]), and the author says he expects "a wide circulation".

    The third cipher appears to be too short to list thirty individuals' next of kin.[6]

    If the Declaration of Independence is used as a key for the first cipher, it yields alphabetical sequences such as abfdefghiijklmmnohpp[11] and others. According to the American Cryptogram Association, the chances of such sequences appearing multiple times in the one ciphertext by chance are less than one in a hundred million million.[11] Although it is conceivable that the first cipher was intended as a proof of concept letting decoders know that they were "on the right track" for one or more of the subsequent ciphers, such a proof would be redundant, as the success of the key with respect to the second document would provide the same evidence on its own.

    Robert Morriss, as represented in the pamphlet, says he was running the Washington Hotel in 1820. Yet contemporary records show he did not start in that position until at least 1823.[12]


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beale_ciphers

  10. #40
    us
    Rev

    Dec 2014
    LA
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    Bible and Decoding Beale Cipher
    Quote Originally Posted by Jean Laf View Post
    I am not targeting the posters here, just using the Beale Ciphers Wikipedia Truth or Hoax section as my target !


    There has been considerable debate over whether the remaining two ciphertexts are real or hoaxes. An early researcher, Carl Hammer of Sperry UNIVAC,[5] used supercomputers of the late 1960s to analyze the ciphers and found that while the ciphers were poorly encoded, the two undeciphered ones did not show the patterns one would expect of randomly chosen numbers and probably encoded an intelligible text.[6] Other questions remain about the authenticity of the pamphlet's account. In 1934, Dr. Clarence Williams, a researcher at the Library of Congress, said, "To me, the pamphlet story has all the earmarks of a fake . . . [There was] no evidence save the word of the unknown author of the pamphlet that he ever had the papers."

    The pamphlet's background story has several implausibilities, and is based almost entirely on circumstantial evidence and hearsay.

    Later cryptographers have claimed that the two remaining ciphertexts have statistical characteristics which suggest that they are not actually encryptions of an English plaintext.[7][8] Alphabetical sequences such as abfdefghiijklmmnohpp are both non-random, as indicated by Carl Hammer,[6] and not words in English.

    Others have also questioned why Beale would have bothered writing three different ciphertexts (with at least two keys, if not ciphers) for what is essentially a single message in the first place,[9] particularly if he wanted to ensure that the next of kin received their share (as it is, with the treasure described, there is no incentive to decode the third cipher).[6]

    Analysis of the language used by the author of the pamphlet (the uses of punctuation, relative clauses, infinitives, conjunctives, and so on) has detected significant correlations between it and Beale's letters, including the plaintext of the second cipher, suggesting that they may have been written by the same person.[1]

    The letters also contain several English words, such as "improvise", not otherwise recorded before the 1820s in The New Monthly Magazine and Literary Journal, Volume 12 in English, but from French improvisation used from 1786 New Orleans area and "stampede" Spanish, "an uproar," from estamper "1823 (intransitive); Beale's "stampeding" apparently first appears in print in the English Language in 1832, in Etiquette, the American Code of Manners, but were used from 1786-1823 in New Orleans in French and Spanish.[1]

    The second message, describing the treasure, has been deciphered, but the others have not, suggesting a deliberate ploy to encourage interest in deciphering the other two texts only to discover that they are hoaxes. In addition, the original sale price of the pamphlet, 50 cents, was a high price for the time (adjusted for inflation, it is equivalent to $13.17 today[10]), and the author says he expects "a wide circulation".

    The third cipher appears to be too short to list thirty individuals' next of kin.[6]

    If the Declaration of Independence is used as a key for the first cipher, it yields alphabetical sequences such as abfdefghiijklmmnohpp[11] and others. According to the American Cryptogram Association, the chances of such sequences appearing multiple times in the one ciphertext by chance are less than one in a hundred million million.[11] Although it is conceivable that the first cipher was intended as a proof of concept letting decoders know that they were "on the right track" for one or more of the subsequent ciphers, such a proof would be redundant, as the success of the key with respect to the second document would provide the same evidence on its own.

    Robert Morriss, as represented in the pamphlet, says he was running the Washington Hotel in 1820. Yet contemporary records show he did not start in that position until at least 1823.[12]


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beale_ciphers

    So far we have had the help of the Mod at this site in making some changes to this part of there page. The parts in red we have updated with new information .

  11. #41
    us
    Rev

    Dec 2014
    LA
    Discovery 2000 Treasure Hunter XJ9-3050 Treasure Hunter 3030
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    Bible and Decoding Beale Cipher
    As we can see this is the most influenced page for the Beale Papers and my new Target !

    The truth with documented proof is all they will except .

  12. #42
    ECS
    ECS is offline
    us
    Mar 2012
    Ocala,Florida
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    Treasurehunting & Historical research
    Quote Originally Posted by Jean Laf View Post
    Don't leg that guy get you down crypto, he just has no clue what he is doing Bro
    Laf, what's up with that modified Grateful Dead avatar you are now using?
    Rebel - KGC likes this.

  13. #43
    us
    Rev

    Dec 2014
    LA
    Discovery 2000 Treasure Hunter XJ9-3050 Treasure Hunter 3030
    3,524
    306 times
    Bible and Decoding Beale Cipher
    Quote Originally Posted by Jean Laf View Post
    I am not targeting the posters here, just using the Beale Ciphers Wikipedia Truth or Hoax section as my target !


    There has been considerable debate over whether the remaining two ciphertexts are real or hoaxes. An early researcher, Carl Hammer of Sperry UNIVAC,[5] used supercomputers of the late 1960s to analyze the ciphers and found that while the ciphers were poorly encoded, the two undeciphered ones did not show the patterns one would expect of randomly chosen numbers and probably encoded an intelligible text.[6] Other questions remain about the authenticity of the pamphlet's account. In 1934, Dr. Clarence Williams, a researcher at the Library of Congress, said, "To me, the pamphlet story has all the earmarks of a fake . . . [There was] no evidence save the word of the unknown author of the pamphlet that he ever had the papers."

    The pamphlet's background story has several implausibilities, and is based almost entirely on circumstantial evidence and hearsay.

    Later cryptographers have claimed that the two remaining ciphertexts have statistical characteristics which suggest that they are not actually encryptions of an English plaintext.[7][8] Alphabetical sequences such as abfdefghiijklmmnohpp are both non-random, as indicated by Carl Hammer,[6] and not words in English.

    Others have also questioned why Beale would have bothered writing three different ciphertexts (with at least two keys, if not ciphers) for what is essentially a single message in the first place,[9] particularly if he wanted to ensure that the next of kin received their share (as it is, with the treasure described, there is no incentive to decode the third cipher).[6]

    Analysis of the language used by the author of the pamphlet (the uses of punctuation, relative clauses, infinitives, conjunctives, and so on) has detected significant correlations between it and Beale's letters, including the plaintext of the second cipher, suggesting that they may have been written by the same person.[1]

    The letters also contain several English words, such as "improvise", not otherwise recorded before the 1820s in The New Monthly Magazine and Literary Journal, Volume 12 in English, but from French improvisation used from 1786 New Orleans area and "stampede" Spanish, "an uproar," from estamper "1823 (intransitive); Beale's "stampeding" apparently first appears in print in the English Language in 1832, in Etiquette, the American Code of Manners, but were used from 1786-1823 in New Orleans in French and Spanish.[1]

    The second message, describing the treasure, has been deciphered, but the others have not, suggesting a deliberate ploy to encourage interest in deciphering the other two texts only to discover that they are hoaxes. In addition, the original sale price of the pamphlet, 50 cents, was a high price for the time (adjusted for inflation, it is equivalent to $13.17 today[10]), and the author says he expects "a wide circulation".

    The third cipher appears to be too short to list thirty individuals' next of kin.[6]


    If the Declaration of Independence is used as a key for the first cipher, it yields alphabetical sequences such as abfdefghiijklmmnohpp[11] and others. According to the American Cryptogram Association, the chances of such sequences appearing multiple times in the one ciphertext by chance are less than one in a hundred million million.[11] Although it is conceivable that the first cipher was intended as a proof of concept letting decoders know that they were "on the right track" for one or more of the subsequent ciphers, such a proof would be redundant, as the success of the key with respect to the second document would provide the same evidence on its own.

    Robert Morriss, as represented in the pamphlet, says he was running the Washington Hotel in 1820. Yet contemporary records show he did not start in that position until at least 1823.[12]


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beale_ciphers

    The third cipher appears to be too short to list thirty individuals' next of kin.[6]

    I think this one looks like a good one for the next Target .

  14. #44
    us
    Jack

    Jan 2015
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    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Quote Originally Posted by Jean Laf View Post
    The third cipher appears to be too short to list thirty individuals' next of kin.[6]

    I think this one looks like a good one for the next Target .
    Should we tell them there is only 10 and not 30?

  15. #45
    us
    Rev

    Dec 2014
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    Bible and Decoding Beale Cipher
    Quote Originally Posted by Cryptography View Post
    Should we tell them there is only 10 and not 30?
    Lynchburg, January 4th, 1822. end of the 9th paragraph

    The whole party were to accompany me for the first five hundred miles, when all but ten would return, these latter to remain with me to the end of the journey. All was carried out as arranged, and I arrived safely with my charge.

 

 
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