Anatomy of a Successful Researched Cache Recovery, a to z
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  1. #1
    Charter Member
    us
    Mar 2005
    south charleston, wv
    White's V3i, White's DFX 300, Garrett Infinium PI, Fisher CZ6A, Garrett Deepseeker ADS
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    Anatomy of a Successful Researched Cache Recovery, a to z

    Do you know of a successful researched cache recovery AND the details of what went into its resolution?

    This thread is a request for those T-Net members who know of SUCCESSFUL cache location projects to share the abc's of the project.

    I personally would not relate my successes, but I would feel comfortable sharing step by step recoveries by other trusted "individuals" including Joe the Hoe, Hardrock Marciano, or Max the Excavator.

    Example:

    1. How did the cache's existence become suspected or known?

    2. What resources such as libraries, interviews, photographs, topos, and archives were used?

    3. How did the THer gain access to the cache location?

    4. How was the cache pin-pointed and extricated? Ex. MD, bottle probe, removing a board?
    What challenges did you overcome?

    5. What happened after the cache was located?

    Items such as the city, state, size of cache, any identifying information can be eliminated.

    It would be nice to know the type of cache...or not, if discretion is required.



    I am requesting no digression and humor posts.








    The alchemists in their search for gold discovered many other things of greater value.
    Ex animo

  2. #2
    us
    Jan 2009
    Lake Wales, FL
    11

    Re: Anatomy of a Successful Researched Cache Recovery, a to z

    This post really caught my attention in that I can see that you are attempting to get some of the successful cache hunters/finders to discretely reveal a minute part of their methodology for others to use. It will be interesting, and I for one, will be closely watching to see if anyone has anything to share. Most of the previous posts have referred in general to published methods and I really don't think there is any "reading between the lines" associated with these posts.

    I hope that your thread garners attention and the posts from successful THer's.

  3. #3

    Jun 2007
    Minnesota
    Tiger Shark, Xterra 705
    3,987
    2917 times
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    Re: Anatomy of a Successful Researched Cache Recovery, a to z

    Go to the Best of Treasurenet section and read "My True Treasure Story" by Night Stalker for a great cache recovery story.
    I'm a greater believer in luck, and I find the harder I work the more I have of it”

    Thomas Jefferson

  4. #4
    Charter Member
    us
    Mar 2005
    south charleston, wv
    White's V3i, White's DFX 300, Garrett Infinium PI, Fisher CZ6A, Garrett Deepseeker ADS
    465
    133 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Re: Anatomy of a Successful Researched Cache Recovery, a to z

    Quote Originally Posted by SusanMN
    Go to the Best of Treasurenet section and read "My True Treasure Story" by Night Stalker for a great cache recovery story.
    Thanks Susan.

    Here is link to your suggested thread: http://forum.treasurenet.com/index.p...c,86636.0.html

    Very interesting and instructive, although the discovery was accidental and not a result of research.

    This thread is requesting information on researched cache recoveries.

    The alchemists in their search for gold discovered many other things of greater value.
    Ex animo

  5. #5
    us
    Feb 2009
    2

    Re: Anatomy of a Successful Researched Cache Recovery, a to z

    So you are wanting to share the methods of others but not your own. Have I got that right?

  6. #6
    us
    Mar 2007
    SE Virginia
    Minelab Explorer SE Pro / Whites Prism II
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    Re: Anatomy of a Successful Researched Cache Recovery, a to z

    haven't found one myself but the following thread was my first taste of treasurenet. Some very good and informative ideas that should be preserved. Its on the old boards but maybe you can find it here on the new boards if you are able to search.

    http://www.treasurenet.com/f/index.p...ic,3103.0.html



  7. #7
    Charter Member
    us
    Mar 2005
    south charleston, wv
    White's V3i, White's DFX 300, Garrett Infinium PI, Fisher CZ6A, Garrett Deepseeker ADS
    465
    133 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Re: Anatomy of a Successful Researched Cache Recovery, a to z

    Quote Originally Posted by docguin
    So you are wanting to share the methods of others but not your own. Have I got that right?
    Mine, if any, have not been researched cache recoveries.

    This thread is for sharing the anatomy of researched cache discoveries, and the steps that led to success.



    The alchemists in their search for gold discovered many other things of greater value.
    Ex animo

  8. #8
    Charter Member
    us
    Mar 2005
    south charleston, wv
    White's V3i, White's DFX 300, Garrett Infinium PI, Fisher CZ6A, Garrett Deepseeker ADS
    465
    133 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Re: Anatomy of a Successful Researched Cache Recovery, a to z

    Well, this thread is nearly a year old. There hasn't been 1 researched cache recovery posted or described.

    My impression is that cache recoveries are nearly always based upon word of mouth, direct knowledge of the cache, or accidental.

    The perception of researching and 'reading between the lines' as techniques of cache recovery may be based upon imagination and wishful thinking. Fun, but not productive.




    The alchemists in their search for gold discovered many other things of greater value.
    Ex animo

  9. #9
    us
    Feb 2008
    Morgantown,WV
    Bounty Hunter Landstar
    4,618
    1002 times

    Re: Anatomy of a Successful Researched Cache Recovery, a to z

    Wolfpack forever

  10. #10
    us
    "The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits."~Albert Einstein

    Jan 2007
    Tesoro Bandido II and DeLeon. also a Detector Pro Headhunter Diver, and a Garrett BFO called The Hunter & a Garrett Ace 250.
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    Re: Anatomy of a Successful Researched Cache Recovery, a to z

    Quote Originally Posted by chirper97
    Well, this thread is nearly a year old. There hasn't been 1 researched cache recovery posted or described.

    My impression is that cache recoveries are nearly always based upon word of mouth, direct knowledge of the cache, or accidental.

    The perception of researching and 'reading between the lines' as techniques of cache recovery may be based upon imagination and wishful thinking. Fun, but not productive.
    You should read Treasure Hunter's Manual #6 by Karl Von Mueller. That book will give you the answers to your questions with stories of real folks who are no longer "around".

    It will also help you to understand why no one has opened their private business to a stranger on an open forum. If you cannot understand the situation then; perhaps you should look for something else. I write this with no malice or ill feelings, but I am a bit surprised that someone would actually ask for valuable and private information such as sought on this post.
    "Dobie created the HUNGER............Von Mueller said, EAT". comment by HELM Associates on the dedication page of their book, Treaasure Lead Generation.

  11. #11
    us
    Feb 2006
    Pulse Star II
    82
    1 times
    Cache Hunting

    Re: Anatomy of a Successful Researched Cache Recovery, a to z

    I'll answer it. This was a good question, overdue and well framed.

    1. I'm after a particular type of cache, not just any cache. I'm a hobbiest hunter and don't want to go full time. That way this stays fun. So I look in specific type of lead material, be it newspaper, old book, word of mouth, or other source. This makes my 'to be studied further' list.

    2. I go to the library, cross reference the area, ie. local county history books, newspaper articles, often personal papers donated to a university collection, or other sources of local lore. I'm looking more to throw the lead out than to find other leads. I'm looking for the 'doesn't make sense' evidence so I can throw it out. However, sometimes I find corroboration. This makes it to my "A" list. Once there, I break out my GIS, and googleearth and look at terrain and build up of the area. Quick and easy, then I take a recon trip to the area and find the local history guy, there's always one. Chat with him, it's easy, I have good social engineering skills. Pick up more info to narrow the scope, or find out it's been found. Usually I have to do some genealogy to narrow it down, and people LOVE talking about that crap. I may have to pull county records to figure out where farmer John held his land in 1921, but I know my GIS, metes and bounds calls (or Section township range). (sometime this winter I'll publish a open source GIS how to)
    On rare occasions when I get stuck, I'll write an article in the local newspaper about some of the history and ask for old folks to contact me if they know about xxx.

    3. Once I make it my active chase, I find the landowner. Call ahead, saying I'm coming out to the area to do some historical research in a few days/weeks. Show up on their door, dressed neatly for the area, but not dapper. Make sure you have something interesting to show of your research on history. Chat with the owners, discuss the interesting history and oh, by the way I'm interested in doing a little metal detecting on your land. I traditionally bring them a gift from my local area. Wine, book, honey, something. One project I had to pay 4 farmers $100 bucks per year to hunt their property. Took me 2 years (a few weekends a month) covering 460 acres, but I found the goods. If I can't reach the people in advance, I show up on their door some weekend with a map in my hands and I use the "I don't THINK I'm lost, but is that cross-street over there where the old store was..." Everyone want to help the lost guy, it defuses most defensiveness right at the door. Of course, it helps when I'm clean shaven and appropriately dressed. Other angles I've used, is that I'm also a beekeeper and can take care of bee problems they may have in their shed/barn/wall of house etc. So some hunts I may not find the goods, but I get a few gallons of honey and a good hive.

    4. I use a Pulse Star 2, with a ten foot wide coil on a cart. Good down to 10m on big targets maybe 15m if my friends are telling the truth on their Argentine capers. In trashy areas and woods, I have to use the 3' wide coil or down to a 1.5' coil. Pinpoint with a old crappy Whites Eagle 2. I've tried using a probe, but the one I have isn't useful in most soils I've found. Also, it doesn't travel well to other countries.

    5. I keep what I find if I got permission to keep all that I dig up. In the odd case where I'm forced to play my hand on what I'm after, we divvy it up by pre negotiated percent; and usually I'll buy out his half. In 2 cases, my friend bought me out, as I brought him along because I thought we'd find it that trip. 4 days of hunting and we found it 1 hour before he had to leave.

    90% of your time in at #2 doing research. Have the brains and emotional courage to throw away leads that look like garbage and don't pass the smell test. Like the missing Bowie mine, KGC treasure, or a nun's hidden moonshine money. Remember the Wizards 1st Rule - People will believe a lie because they want it to be true, or because they are afraid it is true. Just look at the KGC treasure myth - Dirt poor backwoodsmen guarding a treasure for a cause that is 150 years dead by a organization that never had access to large sums of money. Does that pass your smell test?

    I think the best leads are small town leads of miser hoards or bachelor farmers who die in the 20s, 30s or 1940s with a strong likelihood of buried savings.

    Whatever you do. Make sure you have fun. Enjoy the history, the landowners, and the footwork. Life's too short to do something just for money.

    Oh, and buy Treasure Hunters Manual #7 by KVM and a copy of Sudden Wealth.


    Quote Originally Posted by chirper97
    Do you know of a successful researched cache recovery AND the details of what went into its resolution?

    This thread is a request for those T-Net members who know of SUCCESSFUL cache location projects to share the abc's of the project.

    I personally would not relate my successes, but I would feel comfortable sharing step by step recoveries by other trusted "individuals" including Joe the Hoe, Hardrock Marciano, or Max the Excavator.

    Example:

    1. How did the cache's existence become suspected or known?

    2. What resources such as libraries, interviews, photographs, topos, and archives were used?

    3. How did the THer gain access to the cache location?

    4. How was the cache pin-pointed and extricated? Ex. MD, bottle probe, removing a board?
    What challenges did you overcome?

    5. What happened after the cache was located?

    Items such as the city, state, size of cache, any identifying information can be eliminated.

    It would be nice to know the type of cache...or not, if discretion is required.



    I am requesting no digression and humor posts.








    For those who are new to treasure hunting and enjoy treasure hunting books and research - Research Unlimited - Deep Web Research
    but only if you want to learn how to perform proper research.

  12. #12
    Charter Member
    us
    Mar 2005
    south charleston, wv
    White's V3i, White's DFX 300, Garrett Infinium PI, Fisher CZ6A, Garrett Deepseeker ADS
    465
    133 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Re: Anatomy of a Successful Researched Cache Recovery, a to z

    Quote Originally Posted by Texas_Meteorite_Hunter
    I'll answer it. This was a good question, overdue and well framed.

    1. I'm after a particular type of cache, not just any cache. I'm a hobbiest hunter and don't want to go full time. That way this stays fun. So I look in specific type of lead material, be it newspaper, old book, word of mouth, or other source. This makes my 'to be studied further' list.

    2. I go to the library, cross reference the area, ie. local county history books, newspaper articles, often personal papers donated to a university collection, or other sources of local lore. I'm looking more to throw the lead out than to find other leads. I'm looking for the 'doesn't make sense' evidence so I can throw it out. However, sometimes I find corroboration. This makes it to my "A" list. Once there, I break out my GIS, and googleearth and look at terrain and build up of the area. Quick and easy, then I take a recon trip to the area and find the local history guy, there's always one. Chat with him, it's easy, I have good social engineering skills. Pick up more info to narrow the scope, or find out it's been found. Usually I have to do some genealogy to narrow it down, and people LOVE talking about that crap. I may have to pull county records to figure out where farmer John held his land in 1921, but I know my GIS, metes and bounds calls (or Section township range). (sometime this winter I'll publish a open source GIS how to)
    On rare occasions when I get stuck, I'll write an article in the local newspaper about some of the history and ask for old folks to contact me if they know about xxx.

    3. Once I make it my active chase, I find the landowner. Call ahead, saying I'm coming out to the area to do some historical research in a few days/weeks. Show up on their door, dressed neatly for the area, but not dapper. Make sure you have something interesting to show of your research on history. Chat with the owners, discuss the interesting history and oh, by the way I'm interested in doing a little metal detecting on your land. I traditionally bring them a gift from my local area. Wine, book, honey, something. One project I had to pay 4 farmers $100 bucks per year to hunt their property. Took me 2 years (a few weekends a month) covering 460 acres, but I found the goods. If I can't reach the people in advance, I show up on their door some weekend with a map in my hands and I use the "I don't THINK I'm lost, but is that cross-street over there where the old store was..." Everyone want to help the lost guy, it defuses most defensiveness right at the door. Of course, it helps when I'm clean shaven and appropriately dressed. Other angles I've used, is that I'm also a beekeeper and can take care of bee problems they may have in their shed/barn/wall of house etc. So some hunts I may not find the goods, but I get a few gallons of honey and a good hive.

    4. I use a Pulse Star 2, with a ten foot wide coil on a cart. Good down to 10m on big targets maybe 15m if my friends are telling the truth on their Argentine capers. In trashy areas and woods, I have to use the 3' wide coil or down to a 1.5' coil. Pinpoint with a old crappy Whites Eagle 2. I've tried using a probe, but the one I have isn't useful in most soils I've found. Also, it doesn't travel well to other countries.

    5. I keep what I find if I got permission to keep all that I dig up. In the odd case where I'm forced to play my hand on what I'm after, we divvy it up by pre negotiated percent; and usually I'll buy out his half. In 2 cases, my friend bought me out, as I brought him along because I thought we'd find it that trip. 4 days of hunting and we found it 1 hour before he had to leave.

    90% of your time in at #2 doing research. Have the brains and emotional courage to throw away leads that look like garbage and don't pass the smell test. Like the missing Bowie mine, KGC treasure, or a nun's hidden moonshine money. Remember the Wizards 1st Rule - People will believe a lie because they want it to be true, or because they are afraid it is true. Just look at the KGC treasure myth - Dirt poor backwoodsmen guarding a treasure for a cause that is 150 years dead by a organization that never had access to large sums of money. Does that pass your smell test?

    I think the best leads are small town leads of miser hoards or bachelor farmers who die in the 20s, 30s or 1940s with a strong likelihood of buried savings.

    Whatever you do. Make sure you have fun. Enjoy the history, the landowners, and the footwork. Life's too short to do something just for money.

    Oh, and buy Treasure Hunters Manual #7 by KVM and a copy of Sudden Wealth.


    Quote Originally Posted by chirper97
    Do you know of a successful researched cache recovery AND the details of what went into its resolution?

    This thread is a request for those T-Net members who know of SUCCESSFUL cache location projects to share the abc's of the project.

    I personally would not relate my successes, but I would feel comfortable sharing step by step recoveries by other trusted "individuals" including Joe the Hoe, Hardrock Marciano, or Max the Excavator.

    Example:

    1. How did the cache's existence become suspected or known?

    2. What resources such as libraries, interviews, photographs, topos, and archives were used?

    3. How did the THer gain access to the cache location?

    4. How was the cache pin-pointed and extricated? Ex. MD, bottle probe, removing a board?
    What challenges did you overcome?

    5. What happened after the cache was located?

    Items such as the city, state, size of cache, any identifying information can be eliminated.

    It would be nice to know the type of cache...or not, if discretion is required.



    I am requesting no digression and humor posts.
    Thank you Texas Meteorite, for one of the most useful posts on T-Net.

    Wonderful information and insight.

    The alchemists in their search for gold discovered many other things of greater value.
    Ex animo

  13. #13
    Charter Member
    us
    Mar 2005
    south charleston, wv
    White's V3i, White's DFX 300, Garrett Infinium PI, Fisher CZ6A, Garrett Deepseeker ADS
    465
    133 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Re: Anatomy of a Successful Researched Cache Recovery, a to z

    Quote Originally Posted by Shortstack

    You should read Treasure Hunter's Manual #6 by Karl Von Mueller. That book will give you the answers to your questions with stories of real folks who are no longer "around".

    It will also help you to understand why no one has opened their private business to a stranger on an open forum. If you cannot understand the situation then; perhaps you should look for something else. I write this with no malice or ill feelings, but I am a bit surprised that someone would actually ask for valuable and private information such as sought on this post.
    Thanks for your post; you probably meant to be more informative and less insulting.
    1. This thread clearly stated that no personal or private information is requested. I started this thread to ascertain whether any T-Net members had an actual researched cache recovery, who's research could be shared. The cache location, identity of the researcher, and specifics relating to disclosure of personal facts can be omitted or changed. The anatomy/analysis of the research progression is the goal of this thread. I purchased TH Man #6 in 1981, in addition to #7, and all available TH manuals and literature. This collection and study continues.
    I have greatly enjoyed Mueller's writings, but the veracity of his writings have been questioned by at least one close confidant..."Karl was a great story teller, but was known to exaggerate to create stories, not well founded in fact." Of course, when KVMs facts (ex. Lue and pendulum discoveries) are questioned, his writings have been defended by "oh, you have to read between the lines!"

    2. I have enjoyed this hobby for nearly 30 years, and it will take more than Shortstack's admonition to limit my activities.

    ex animo!



    The alchemists in their search for gold discovered many other things of greater value.
    Ex animo

  14. #14
    us
    "The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits."~Albert Einstein

    Jan 2007
    Tesoro Bandido II and DeLeon. also a Detector Pro Headhunter Diver, and a Garrett BFO called The Hunter & a Garrett Ace 250.
    4,314
    389 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Re: Anatomy of a Successful Researched Cache Recovery, a to z

    Quote Originally Posted by chirper97
    Quote Originally Posted by Shortstack

    You should read Treasure Hunter's Manual #6 by Karl Von Mueller. That book will give you the answers to your questions with stories of real folks who are no longer "around".

    It will also help you to understand why no one has opened their private business to a stranger on an open forum. If you cannot understand the situation then; perhaps you should look for something else. I write this with no malice or ill feelings, but I am a bit surprised that someone would actually ask for valuable and private information such as sought on this post.
    Thanks for your post; you probably meant to be more informative and less insulting.
    1. This thread clearly stated that no personal or private information is requested. I started this thread to ascertain whether any T-Net members had an actual researched cache recovery, who's research could be shared. The cache location, identity of the researcher, and specifics relating to disclosure of personal facts can be omitted or changed. The anatomy/analysis of the research progression is the goal of this thread. I purchased TH Man #6 in 1981, in addition to #7, and all available TH manuals and literature. This collection and study continues.
    I have greatly enjoyed Mueller's writings, but the veracity of his writings have been questioned by at least one close confidant..."Karl was a great story teller, but was known to exaggerate to create stories, not well founded in fact." Of course, when KVMs facts (ex. Lue and pendulum discoveries) are questioned, his writings have been defended by "oh, you have to read between the lines!"

    2. I have enjoyed this hobby for nearly 30 years, and it will take more than Shortstack's admonition to limit my activities.
    ex animo!
    "Admonition"? If you will reread my post, you will see that I wrote my statement "with no malice or ill feelings", but with "surprise" that someone would ask for such private information on an open forum. After all, almost a year had pasted without a response from anyone , but yourself. You seem to be irritated by that. So be it. I wish you well in your endeavors, but I do have to ask; do you REALLY think that the people who threatened KVM, ransacked his place and burned down his storage building containing all of his reseach material did it because of his "made up " stories? I guess they did that because they did not want him competing with the Brothers Grimm.

    You claim to have been in THing for "nearly 30 years", but you are still an amateur because only an amateur would ask how to research treasures after supposedly doing it for 3 decades.
    "Dobie created the HUNGER............Von Mueller said, EAT". comment by HELM Associates on the dedication page of their book, Treaasure Lead Generation.

  15. #15

    Mar 2003
    Indiana
    All types of BFOs owned. Especially want White's Arrow; White's Oremaster; Exanimo Spartan Little Monster; Garrett contract Little Monster.
    1,584
    55 times

    Re: Anatomy of a Successful Researched Cache Recovery, a to z

    When i've tracked back the cause of people badmouthing KvM it
    usually comes from them repeating what someone else said. If
    they are the prime source of the negative comments it usually
    means that they were on the receiving end of a von Mueller
    come-uppance. The man stood up for the little guy. He hated
    phonies and he hated cheats. He loved practical jokes. He got the
    "reputation" for printing bull because he planted a couple of fake
    stories so that he could prove that they had been lifted without
    credit by other authors. There is one phony book listed in Journals
    of Eldorado for that reason. The most infamous example of that
    was the fantastic NELOTS treasure. He listed it in his usual place
    in his usual way and within a couple months it had appeared in
    several of the national magazines with "additional" details. That is
    when he lowered the boom and announced to all and sundry that
    it was a hoax planted as an honesty test and that anyone who
    bothered to read the name backwards would know that it was
    STOLEN. You said where you got the word on KvM. Judge for
    yourself whether your source is just repeating what he heard or
    working from personal malice. siegfried schlagrule
    "We have done so much; for so many; for so long; with so little; that pretty soon we'll be able to do anything; with nothing at all."
    my unit motto - 138th Aviation Company -  224th Aviation Battalion - Phu Bai, I Corps, Republic of Vietnam - 1972
    Siegfried Schlagrule

 

 
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