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Thread: Post hole banks

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  1. #1
    us
    May 2009
    18
    1 times

    Post hole banks

    Hi everyone, I have been hunting a couple of old homesteads on land we rent. The land is going to be auctioned off this month so I my hunting time is limited. Can anyone give me advice on how to find post hole banks? I would like to hunt for these while I still have time but I am not exactly sure what they would look like or the best way to locate. Advice is appreciated.
    Thank you,
    Kathy

  2. #2
    us
    I can dig it! "WP"

    Mar 2007
    Indiana
    Bounty Hunter's, Whites TM 808, Whites GMT, Suction Dredges, Hand Dredges, Trommels, Gold Vacs, High Bankers, Fluid bed Gold Traps, Gold Pans, Sluices, Dry Washers, Miller Tables, Rp4 Shaker table etc
    5,442
    4108 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Re: Post hole banks

    Hi Kathy,

    Many farmers buried their coins beneath the fence posts of their properties. They simply removed the fence post, inserted the container of money into the hole, and then replaced the post.

    I wish there was an easy way to know which post the stash was under, every hider had his own method.
    Best way I know of is to just check them all.

    Typical hiding places have been known to be within sight from the bedroom window, or near a chicken coop or other animals that would warn of a strangers presence, and out of sight of neighbors and public view.

    One problem is that the post hole is usually deeper than a typical metal detector can reach. That's why a lot of cache hunters have a twobox detector in their arsenal along with a probe. http://forum.treasurenet.com/index.p...tml#msg1844682

    Good luck,

    GG~


  3. #3
    us
    Mar 2007
    Michigan
    Whites V3i
    471
    60 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Re: Post hole banks

    One thing to keep in mind is that a post hole bank will (most likely) not be an end or corner post that is connected to the fence. The corner and end posts are the main support posts in my experience in putting up fences. My dad and I would dig those posts deeper and stretch the wire and attach it to them before putting the other posts up.

    Now if I were going to bury a post hole bank I would put a "dummy" post right in the fence line - A post that is not really attached or has minimal attachments to the fence. The last thing I would want to do while retrieving my money is to waste time trying to untangle fence wire from my bank post. Plus if it were not attached, I would be able to find it quite easily while the typical person seeing it would not have a clue.

    Now if only there was a Sears warehouse out there somewhere that still had the address records of those that bought the post hole banks. That would narrow things down a bit

    Good Luck.

  4. #4
    Kentucky Kache

    Re: Post hole banks

    If you still have remains of posts in the ground (not likely), notice if one is either higher or lower than the rest. I think the best advice has already been given - search ALL the holes, and make sure you have a machine that detects deep.

  5. #5
    us
    May 2009
    18
    1 times

    Re: Post hole banks

    Thank you for the information. I have a better idea on what to look for, and where to look. I know the odds are slim to none but it is always fun to look.
    Thanks again, Kathy

  6. #6
    us
    Having the time of my life!

    Sep 2008
    Cincinnati
    847
    824 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Re: Post hole banks



    Good luck in the search, you might also use the detector to run up and down the posts.....some of the really smart ones cut a core out of the center of the post, put the cache into the core hole, then fashioned a plug (out of the same type wood) and put it back into the hole! They could access it very quickly and not have to pull out the post.

    When you find something using this solution just let me know (PM) I'll send you my address of where to send my cut to!
    Yea, though I walk through the Valley of Death I will fear no evil for thou art with me.

  7. #7
    us
    Oct 2008
    Colorado Springs
    95
    2 times

    Re: Post hole banks

    "Typical hiding places have been known to be within sight from the bedroom window, or near a chicken coop or other animals that would warn of a strangers presence, and out of sight of neighbors and public view."

    Exactly, and even more in depth in books by H. Glenn Carson. Sometimes referred to onpy as Glenn Carson.
    "Draw me not without reason, Sheath me not without honor"

         ~Found on old Spanish sword made by sword maker     Gallegos~

  8. #8
    us
    Nov 2009
    las cruces nm
    35
    13 times

    Re: Post hole banks

    Keep in mind that many caches were not buried in post holes but next to them for the very reason mentioned in a previous post. Nobody wants to dig up a post to get at their money. Often the post was used as a marker such as " 3 feet perpendicular from the 3rd post".

  9. #9
    us
    Oct 2004
    Upper Chesapeake Bay, Maryland
    Whites DFX
    839
    353 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Re: Post hole banks

    I like this post on post hole banks, it is much more real then those 20 foot deep hidden caches. A home bank cache needs easy access, it would be a million times easier to go to the fence post and add or take money out of your jar, then to burry it 20 feet deep.

  10. #10
    us
    Sep 2007
    1,797
    110 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Re: Post hole banks

    Did any of you found any post hole banks?

  11. #11
    us
    Tuberale

    May 2010
    Portland, Oregon
    White's Coinmaster Pro
    4,047
    702 times

    Re: Post hole banks

    Original post hole bank: near a corner but not AT a corner. Post should be loose or moveable. Literally should lift out of "hole" easily, and be easily replaced. Many times not deeply buried, just the impression of depth is necessary.

    Have not personally heard of any post hole caches that were "near" a post hole, but not at it. Doesn't mean it couldn't exist.

    Helps to have some knowledge of fence building. Early fences often made of specific woods: Osage orange, Redwood, Black locust, Western Redcedar, or other wood that is both stout and unlikely to rot. Cypress possible in the south. Probably will not be at a corner or end point, as those posts had to be solidly anchored and braced to support stretching the fence line. Post could be unusually short, oddly shaped or distinctive in some way: maybe with a can inverted to keep water off the top.

  12. #12
    Kentucky Kache

    Re: Post hole banks

    Quote Originally Posted by Tuberale
    Original post hole bank: near a corner but not AT a corner. Post should be loose or moveable. Literally should lift out of "hole" easily, and be easily replaced. Many times not deeply buried, just the impression of depth is necessary.

    Have not personally heard of any post hole caches that were "near" a post hole, but not at it. Doesn't mean it couldn't exist.

    Helps to have some knowledge of fence building. Early fences often made of specific woods: Osage orange, Redwood, Black cottonwood, Western Redcedar, or other wood that is both stout and unlikely to rot. Cypress possible in the south. Probably will not be at a corner or end point, as those posts had to be solidly anchored and braced to support stretching the fence line. Post could be unusually short, oddly shaped or distinctive in some way: maybe with a can inverted to keep water off the top.
    Locust and cedar are two biggies.

  13. #13
    us
    Dave

    Mar 2006
    Epworth, Ohio
    Compass xp-pro
    137
    9 times

    Re: Post hole banks

    Kathy, look for anything that might have been fashioned to the post like for instance a horse shoe....

  14. #14
    th
    Nov 2010
    Thailand/Europe/California
    Excalibur 2 1000
    1,151
    237 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Re: Post hole banks

    Someone mentioned that years ago, Sears or another chain, sold post hole banks. Does anyone know what it looked like? Im sure it must have been more than a mason jar. Or could this be just another myth? Its hard to believe that someone would bury their stash under a post, if it still had barb wire attached to it, unless not very tight. Also moving post around might draw some attention. Would like to hear of someone finding a bank like this and how deep. Its always easy to bury something, but if you have to get to it every now and then, there might be better places to hide a stash.

  15. #15
    us
    Sep 2007
    1,797
    110 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Re: Post hole banks

    #13 ask a lot of interesting questions.

 

 
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