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Thread: Custers gold?

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  1. #16
    us
    Sep 2007
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    I agree with #6, I do not believe the story either, but go for it anyway, and you may find old stuff and old single coins that is worth a lot of money. Make sense to me. Good luck.

  2. #17
    us
    WolfPack member

    Aug 2009
    New Hampshire
    Garret Master hunter Cx Plus
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    The Truth
    The funny thing about there supposing to be lost gold at the time of the battle of little big horn.The only thing Custer got was a whole bunch of lead
    YOU KNOW MY STANCE,LIVE FREE OR DIE

    Liberals,too stupid to know that they are really communists.

    A mans rights rest in three boxes: the ballot box, the jury box, and the cartridge box.


    During times of universal deceit, telling the truth
    becomes a revolutionary act. -- George Orwell


  3. #18
    ECS
    ECS is offline
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    Mar 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by skeeterd View Post
    I can't get them to work either. I Maybe able to find the Billings Gazette article at our local library. Maybe it can point me in the right direction.
    I do not understand why the links do not work?
    If you google Capt Grant March+Far West steamboat it should direct you to those sites.

  4. #19
    us
    Dennis

    Jan 2012
    Montana
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    Here's one account:

    During the 1876 campain against the Sioux and Cheyenne Indians in the west, the War Department leased the Missouri river steamer Far West as a supply ship to serve the troops. The Far West was loaded with 200 tons of supplies and equipment for the commands operating in the Big Horn country. Captain Grant Marsh was commissioned to take the vessel up the Yellowstone river to the Big Horn, then up the Big Horn to the mouth of the Little Big Horn river. Here he was to anchor and wait the arrival of General Terry's troops who were to recieve the supplies. Captain Marsh was instructed to be in position at the Little Big Horn by June 26, 1876.
    Captain Marsh anchored about 20 miles up the Big Horn river at what he thought was the mouth of the Little Big Horn river and settled down to wait. On the following morning, two freight wagons drawn by mules pulled up at the river's edge opposite the Far West. One of the three men hailed the vessel and was rowed out to her. The man explained to Marsh that he was in charge of the wagons which operated for a freighting company out of Bozeman, Montana. He and his companions were on route to Bismarck N.D. with a cargo of gold.Since they had had several narrow escapes from indians, the man asked Captian Marsh to take the gold aboard and deliver it in Bismark on his trip back down the Missouri.
    When Marsh wanted to know the value of the gold, he was told it was $800,000., packed in buckskin bags. Reluctant to assume responsibility for such cargo, Marsh explained that he was under orders from the War Department and could not set a date for arrival in Bismarck. He finally agreed, however to help the freighters and had the gold transfered to his ship. The freighters headed back to Bozeman and were never seen alive again.
    The next moring, curls of smoke from behind the hills in the distance suggested a large indian encampment. Uncertain that he was anchored at the mouth of the Little Big Horn, and fearing that the indians might attack his vessel, Captain Marsh unanchored and steamed back down the the Big Horn to a safer anchorage. He then ordered the gold to be rowed ashore and buried some distance inland.
    On the morning following the burial of the gold, the Far West returned to the mouth of the Little Big Horn and anchored again. It was there that the crew learned from a Crow indian scout of the massacre of Custer's command on June 25, 1876. Soon afterward General Terry ordered Marsh to take aboard the wounded from Reno's and Benteen's commands and transport them to Bismarck. In the urgency of the situation, the buried gold was forgotten.
    With 50 or 60 wounded soldiers aboard, the Far West started the hazardous journey down the Big Horn, followed by bands of hostile Sioux running along the banks. Reaching the Yellowstone river, Marsh anchored and awaited the arrival of Terry's forces which he was instructed to ferry across the river. It was not until the morning of July 3rd that the Far West began the 700 mile trip to Bismarck. Upon it's arrival there, the first news of the Custer Massacre was released to the world.
    Some years later, after Marsh had given up command of the Far West, he is said to have gone to Bozeman to inform the freighting company where the gold entrusted to him was buried. He also learned that the three men had never returned to Bozeman. They were presumably casualties of an indian attack. Similar freighting losses had forced the company out of business. So far as it is known, neither Captian Marsh nor any of the men who had participated in the burial of the gold ever tried to recover it.

    There may be other versions out there?
    Last edited by old digger; Nov 27, 2012 at 04:26 PM.

  5. #20
    us
    Oct 2012
    Retired and traveling
    Whites 6000di Pro SL Whites Goldmaster II vSat Whites Prizim 6T
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    It's a good clarafication of the story. Three things poke me in the eye about it. First, the Capt wasn't certain he was at the mouth of the Little Big Horn, so was he or wasn't he? Next, he pulled in at a safe anchorage...a pretty vague location to base a search around, and third, "he" actually had no idea where it was buried aside from his order to take it ashore and bury it "some distance". This would lead me to believe that "if" the story is true, the Capt. isn't the starting point of a search.

    I also don't like "so far as it is known" the men that buried the gold never tried to recover it. Really? I think that stretches the limits of credibility. TN has for sake of round numbers 47,000 members. How many of us does anyone reason would NOT go looking for hundreds of thousands in gold "IF" we knew where it was buried? Maybe 1 or 2 out of the 47,000. I'm afraid I have to write the story off as a pipe dream.

    I think anyone interested in this one, would be better served researching the campsites used by the three cavalry forces on their march to the Little Big Horn. You'd be more likely to retrieve relics and maybe even a gold coin or three hunting those areas which would be ample reward.
    Last edited by Phanntom; Nov 27, 2012 at 05:31 PM.
    lastleg and cactusjumper like this.

  6. #21
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    Dennis

    Jan 2012
    Montana
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    Now the part about the freighters seems somewhat consistent in that the Bozeman trail crosses both the Big Horn and the Little Horn rivers. I don't think that a steamer would be able to travel up the Little Horn at this time of the year unless there was a late snow runoff from the Bighorn Mts.
    And where the Bozeman Trail crosses the Big Horn river is at least 20 more miles southwest (upstream) from the mouth of the Little Horn river.
    Not sure, but maybe they headed east of the Bozeman Trail towards Bismarck?

  7. #22
    us
    WolfPack member

    Aug 2009
    New Hampshire
    Garret Master hunter Cx Plus
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    The Truth
    Better yet hit the site of the rosebud fight if it isnt protected which it most likely is.
    YOU KNOW MY STANCE,LIVE FREE OR DIE

    Liberals,too stupid to know that they are really communists.

    A mans rights rest in three boxes: the ballot box, the jury box, and the cartridge box.


    During times of universal deceit, telling the truth
    becomes a revolutionary act. -- George Orwell


  8. #23
    us
    Sep 2007
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    107 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Quote Originally Posted by skeeterd View Post
    Does anyone know of any documentation about this story? It seems pretty far fetched but I live very near this area figured a little research couldn't hurt. I think starting with the log book of the Far West steamer would the best place to begin. But I don't even know where to look for that or if a log book even exists. Any ideas would be helpful. Thanks.
    Do your best, and keep researching. Good luck and show pictures.

  9. #24
    us
    Dennis

    Jan 2012
    Montana
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    It is possible that Marsh may have anchored at the mouth of Ninemile Creek, and not at the mouth of the Little Horn. If he anchored at the mouth of the Little Horn I would think that he would have anchored right next to the large Sioux and Cheyenne village which was between the present towns of Crow Agency and Hardin.

  10. #25
    us
    Oct 2012
    Montana
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    I believe, if anything, he would have gone past the mouth of the Little Horn. 9 mile creek only runs water in a very wet spring. The next live stream after the Little Horn is RottenGrass cr. and then Soap cr. The Little Horn river is a VERY small river. It can be walked across in most places right now without getting your ankles wet! Captian Marsh could very easily have thought this was just a large creek and never realised it was a river untill he had gone too far up stream.

  11. #26
    us
    Sep 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by skeeterd View Post
    So does anybody have any ideas where I could start researching?
    From the beginning. Good luck.
    Honest Samuel likes this.

  12. #27
    ECS
    ECS is offline
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    Mar 2012
    Ocala,Florida
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    The FAR WEST was employed to carry the wounded back to Fort Lincoln,the addition of the gold story was first mentioned by two treasure writers-Emile Schurmacher (The gold bars from Williston version) & Roy Norvill (The three miners version).
    I do not know the source of their information.
    As with many treasure legends,actual events,people,and locations have been added to provide a feel of veracity to a tale.
    For both versions:
    http://www.jamesmdeen.com/treasurestory3.htm
    NOTE: March's account and newspaper accounts of that time never mentioned gold in the events of June 26,1876.

  13. #28

    May 2015
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    The Far West and Captain Marsh were at a rendezvous with Terry and Custer PRIOR to the Seventh's departure to find, fix and fight the Indians. Terry briefed Custer and Gibbon on board the Far West the night before the Seventh departed and was still at the rendezvous when Marsh and his crew learned of the defeat suffered by the Seventh on 26 June 1876 at about 4:30 PM, Chicago time. Marsh then began preparing the Far West to receive the wounded, cutting grasses and placing them on the decks. Once the wounded were aboard, Marsh began the voyage to Fort Lincoln, the headquarters of the Seventh Cavalry. Due to my fifty year study of this one battle, I place no credibility in this story.
    BTW, the Seventh U. S. Cavalry Regiment was not wiped out to the last man, as Hollywood would have you believe. They suffered about 50% casualties but exist today in the US Army. They have an unbroken chain of service with the Army and fought the hardest, most intense battle of the Viet Nam War and was one of the leading divisions into Baghdad during the Second Gulf War.

  14. #29

    Dec 2004
    164
    40 times
    Hi. Consider myself a problem solver rather than researcher. I use other's research. Good research essential. Notice how difficult it can be to get information. This one's real with a high difficulty level. There is enough info to work with. As it so happens this one is not on my high priority list. There was $375,000 in gold bars loaded for transport between stops before the massacre was known. Then, on the afternoon of July 3, 1876 the Far West began the 740 mile run down the Big Horn, Yellowstone and Missouri. Here are relevent excerpts from one I believe is one of the best researchers on this topic:
    "Then, less than four miles from the Yellowstone, at the most dangerous curve in the river, Marsh saw that a large Sioux war party was waiting on the bluff ahead."
    "A few minutes later she rounded the bend and was out of range."
    "...as they approached the juncture of the two rivers, they saw the distant glow of fires along the banks of the Yellowstone."
    "He decided to cut and load wood immediately and, at the same time, to bury the gold on shore for safekeeping."
    "The riverboat put into shore less than half a mile before the Yellowstone. Here the line of bluffs gave way to a series of hills.
    While Jenks and members of the crew chopped wood under the starry sky, Marsh, assisted by Campbell, made several trips with the gold bars, carrying them approximately five hundred yards inland, where they cached them at the foot of the nearest hill. They dug the hole on the far side, at the base of the slope facing away from the river."

    If this works, buy me a 1991 Chev Suburban 3/4 ton 4x4.
    Last edited by GaBnn3; May 06, 2015 at 03:51 PM.

  15. #30

    Feb 2008
    2,871
    622 times
    How do you know it was a starry sky during the wood chopping?
    Honest Samuel likes this.

 

 
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