A Cache Buried Below My House
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  1. #1

    Dec 2019
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    A Cache Buried Below My House

    Hello everyone. I have good reason to believe there was a cache of gold bars buried below my house (before my house was built here). So I am currently digging for the cache in hopes of a successful recovery. When I dug down to about 4 ft, I encountered a layer of stones. Among the layer were two seemingly unnaturally shaped stones. One of the stones seemed to have been filed down on three sides, to make a portion of it in to a box shape. The other stone is the shape of a three-sided pyramid with a flat square-like bottom. It was found with the bottom up, pointing down at the very center of where I believe the cache to be. After digging further down, at around 5 ft I encountered a very strong smell coming from the soil I was excavating. To me it smelled like gunpowder but stronger. Someone said it could be crude oil but I'm not even sure I've even smelled crude oil before. Are the smells similar? Anyway, when the groundwater started to come in, it became clear that there was indeed some type of oil that had been mixed in to this layer of soil. It settled on the surface of the groundwater and produced that rainbow-like shimmer that you see on the road puddles after it rains. Check it out...


    Attachment 1784356
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    What else could cause this rainbow-like shimmer on the surface of the water, if not crude oil? Could this have been added to the soil to create a bowling affect with the groundwater, as another obstacle to overcome before reaching the cache?

  2. #2
    Charter Member
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    papa

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    I'll address the oil. Could be crude, depending where you are. More likely, when Billy Bob, up the holler, poured out his old oil in his yard 10 years ago, he didn't know it would end up under YOUR house, next to a bunch of GOLD bricks.


    "And so the population was gradually led into the demoralising temptations of arcades, baths, and sumptuous banquets. The unsuspecting Britons spoke of such novelties as 'civilisation', when in fact they were only a feature of their enslavement." Tacitus, Roman Senator and Historian, written AD 98.

  3. #3

    Dec 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by tseek7 View Post
    What else could cause this rainbow-like shimmer on the surface of the water, if not crude oil? Could this have been added to the soil to create a bowling affect with the groundwater, as another obstacle to overcome before reaching the cache?
    Chlordane. I'd be very careful digging under a house, especially if it was built before the mid 1980's. It was mostly used to kill termites in the soil under houses, and is very dangerous. Very, very dangerous. It was commonly used in an oil based solution and has a half life of 30 years:

    Chlordane

    You don't want to play around with it. If you have even a whisper of belief that chlordane is present, I'd stop digging until you can have it checked out and know for certain that it isn't present.
    1637, U.B., DizzyDigger and 11 others like this.
    Middenmonster

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  4. #4

    Dec 2019
    53
    78 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Kray Gelder View Post
    I'll address the oil. Could be crude, depending where you are. More likely, when Billy Bob, up the holler, poured out his old oil in his yard 10 years ago, he didn't know it would end up under YOUR house, next to a bunch of GOLD bricks.
    This place was just farm land less than 10 years ago. So that could be possible. But would the oil seep down so completely through 5 ft of top soil and settle here like this? I did not get even a hint of it until 5 ft depth. Then suddenly I was nearly floored by the powerful smell. So it can smell somewhat like gunpowder?

    Quote Originally Posted by MiddenMonster View Post
    Chlordane. I'd be very careful digging under a house, especially if it was built before the mid 1980's. It was mostly used to kill termites in the soil under houses, and is very dangerous. Very, very dangerous. It was commonly used in an oil based solution and has a half life of 30 years:

    Chlordane

    You don't want to play around with it. If you have even a whisper of belief that chlordane is present, I'd stop digging until you can have it checked out and know for certain that it isn't present.
    This house is made almost entirely of cement and this was all farm land going back pretty far in history. I've been digging in it with no gloves for a while now, so I guess I'd be dead already. But I did not know about that termite chemical. Good to know
    PetesPockets55 likes this.

  5. #5

    Dec 2019
    53
    78 times
    MiddenMonster, you got me scared now. I guess I need to have some of this water tested at a laboratory. I certainly don't want testicular cancer...
    PetesPockets55 and SanMan like this.

  6. #6

    Dec 2004
    Down in the pit
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    Quote Originally Posted by tseek7 View Post
    MiddenMonster, you got me scared now. I guess I need to have some of this water tested at a laboratory. I certainly don't want testicular cancer...
    It would definitely be worth the money to find out. One way to check to see if chlordane was used is to look at any concrete slabs that are exposed around the perimeter of the house, such as porches and sidewalks that are in contact with the ground. If you see concrete circles every 6' or so that are about 3/4"-1" in diameter that look like plugs for holes that were drilled that's a sure sign that pest control people drilled the concrete and pumped chlordane into the ground. The plugs will look different than the surrounding concrete. I knew a girl back in the 1980's that for some reason crazy reason used chlordane to kill roaches. She bundled herself up in clothing and covered up all exposed skin--except for the gap where her gloves left her wrists exposed and her face so she could see. She was sick as a dog for several days after she sprayed it using a common spraying canister that you pump up with air. In general, I'd be careful digging under any house that is more than 35 years old. All kinds of crap got dumped under houses back in those days, including asbestos and lead. It may be nothing but oil based paint, but you don't want to have a "Poltergeist" situation on your hands by digging up a sacred chlordane burial ground.

    You might start by getting some old exterminator guy to look at it and see what he says. I'm sure they are trained to look for that kind of stuff, especially if they are old enough to have used it back in the day.
    Last edited by MiddenMonster; Dec 30, 2019 at 01:33 AM.
    PetesPockets55, Ryano and SanMan like this.
    Middenmonster

    There are things you can replace. And others you cannot. The time has come to weigh those things. This space is getting hot. Whoa! This space is getting hot!

  7. #7

    Dec 2019
    53
    78 times
    Quote Originally Posted by MiddenMonster View Post
    It would definitely be worth the money to find out. One way to check to see if chlordane was used is to look at any concrete slabs that are exposed around the perimeter of the house, such as porches and sidewalks that are in contact with the ground. If you see concrete circles every 6' or so that are about 3/4"-1" in diameter that look like plugs for holes that were drilled that's a sure sign that pest control people drilled the concrete and pumped chlordane into the ground. The plugs will look different than the surrounding concrete. I knew a girl back in the 1980's that for some reason crazy reason used chlordane to kill roaches. She bundled herself up in clothing and covered up all exposed skin--except for the gap where her gloves left her wrists exposed and her face so she could see. She was sick as a dog for several days after she sprayed it using a common spraying canister that you pump up with air. In general, I'd be careful digging under any house that is more than 35 years old. All kinds of crap got dumped under houses back in those days, including asbestos and lead. It may be nothing but oil based paint, but you don't want to have a "Poltergeist" situation on your hands by digging up a sacred chlordane burial ground.

    You might start by getting some old exterminator guy to look at it and see what he says. I'm sure they are trained to look for that kind of stuff, especially if they are old enough to have used it back in the day.
    Ok, so I would be in really bad shape by now if that's what this was. I've been digging in it. Breaking it all up with a jackhammer and then scooping it up with my bare hands in to a bucket. It gets all over my body. So I'm assuming that whatever it is can't be that hazardous to humans. Thanks again for the heads up though.
    PetesPockets55 likes this.

  8. #8
    Charter Member
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    At this point how far below ground level are you?

    How much further are you going?

    What lead you to believe you have a cache of gold under your house?
    gunsil, chub, Noah_D and 5 others like this.
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  9. #9
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    What state are you in? It sure looks like oil. Could have even been an oil fuel tank down there. Hard to know. The reason I asked about what state you are in some states have petroleum products seeping out of the ground or near the surface naturally, like California, but I think your stuff is manmade, not natural.
    AviTech Associate

  10. #10
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    Silver Fiend

    Oct 2009
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    Obviously your only option here is to demolish your house and have a commercial excavator dig 100 feet down to recover your gold bars.
    gunsil, ticndig, Noah_D and 7 others like this.

  11. #11
    Charter Member
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    DALTON

    Dec 2008
    NW Arkansas
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    Quote Originally Posted by smokeythecat View Post
    What state are you in? It sure looks like oil. Could have even been an oil fuel tank down there. Hard to know. The reason I asked about what state you are in some states have petroleum products seeping out of the ground or near the surface naturally, like California, but I think your stuff is manmade, not natural.
    My grandmas house is the same way. I can detect in the yard, dig a good size plug, and if it’s wet outside that natural gas they have in her area will cause the water to do that. She’s got a well on her property they drilled 30+ years ago, and she gets royalties off of it, plus free natural gas for the house for heat. Also when Broken_detector and I were little the city of a population of only 700 tore her neighbors house down. There was a low spot there for a year or so where the grass grew back. So when the spring rains came it flooded the yard with about 3 feet of water, and we both went out and played in the water. The natural gas sheen was on top of the water, and when my nanny came by she came screaming at us to get out of that “nasty” water. Needless to say we both got sick for a week from that raw natural gas seeping through the ground, and we were playing in it. Her whole town is scary because when it rains, and the ground gets completely saturated you can see the natural gas bubbling up through the ground through the water.
    Digging up relics one day at a time. Always looking for fellow detectorist to go out with and enjoy this hobby. Been swinging a coil going on 24 years now this year and loving every minute of it. Looking for members to join our group in Arkansas. PM me if interested.

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  12. #12

    Dec 2019
    53
    78 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Toecutter View Post
    At this point how far below ground level are you?

    How much further are you going?

    What lead you to believe you have a cache of gold under your house?
    I get a solid signal from my TM 808 and the 1 x 1 meter PI coil. So I've decided to pursue the signal down to about 17 ft, if still nothing I'll check again with my 58 cm PI coil. If I get a strong signal I'll continue down to 20 ft. If nothing I'll stop to consider whether or not to continue, but will definitely not follow the signal any further than 25 ft which is the alleged maximum depth of my PI machine using the 1 x 1 meter coil. Its a large object. So it is something that would be picked up at the deepest depths my machines are capable of penetrating. Now if along the way I come across something that is so profound that it leaves zero room for doubt that someone must have buried something valuable here then I will have to recalculate my maximum depth. Because the machines could be detecting mineralization but some of my other tools have an unlimited depth range. There are so many reasons why I believe the cache is there. More than enough, for me, to dig a 25 ft hole. Its a series of events and results which were personally convincing enough to lead me to pursue the target. I could go over it all but I already know it won't convince anyone on the outside of my own perspective because I don't have the words to articulate it all in an effective manner and don't want to open myself up to ridicule any more than I already have. But you can see my equipment list, its in an order of greatest to least (based on my own experience) and I used all those tools to confirm this target.
    Last edited by tseek7; Dec 30, 2019 at 11:16 AM.

  13. #13

    Dec 2019
    53
    78 times
    Quote Originally Posted by smokeythecat View Post
    What state are you in? It sure looks like oil. Could have even been an oil fuel tank down there. Hard to know. The reason I asked about what state you are in some states have petroleum products seeping out of the ground or near the surface naturally, like California, but I think your stuff is manmade, not natural.
    In my area there is no natural gas at all. What makes you think its man-made?
    PetesPockets55 likes this.

  14. #14
    Charter Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by tseek7 View Post
    Its a large object. So it is something that would be picked up at the deepest depths my machines are capable of penetrating.
    How do you know that it's a large object?

    Quote Originally Posted by tseek7 View Post
    Because the machines could be detecting mineralization but some of my other tools have an unlimited depth range.
    What tools have an unlimited depth range?

    Quote Originally Posted by tseek7 View Post
    There are so many reasons why I believe the cache is there. More than enough, for me, to dig a 25 ft hole. Its a series of events and results which were personally convincing enough to lead me to pursue the target. I could go over it all but I already know it won't convince anyone on the outside of my own perspective because I don't have the words to articulate it all in an effective manner and don't want to open myself up to ridicule any more than I already have.
    Many reasons are not required if one or two of them are good. I understand that you don't wish to share them, but you may find that getting a few uninterested parties to weigh in on what you're dealing with could potentially save you quite a bit of time and money. If you're dead set on tearing up your foundation, that's your business, but everything that you've shared so far is making me wince.

    That film on the water could be petroleum, or it could be bacteria. On a related note, you mention a gunpowder smell. I'm not sure if I understand. I associate that term with smokeless powder, which just has a slight solvent smell if it's been sitting around for a while. Are you referring to something sulfurous? More importantly, would you describe that odor as being reminiscent of rotten eggs? If the answer to that last question is yes, stay the hell out of that hole and fill it back in.

    One final thought: if someone buried gold there, presumably they were planning on coming back and getting it at some point. If you were planning on burying some gold in a patch of uninhabited farmland, how deep would you bury it? 1 foot? 5 feet? 20 feet? More? Remember, when it's time to go back and get it, you're going to have to dig back down to it and get it out. What depths are recovered caches normally found at?
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  15. #15
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    I hope you realize that your two-box detector detects up as well as down. You are detecting the house above, not treasure under the ground.
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