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  1. #1
    us
    manaloneblog.wordpress.com

    Jun 2010
    Wherever there be treasure!
    An older blue Excal with connector, remote, Skullie headphones, and various coils. Got rid of the rest of my machines.
    13,981
    8631 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    River Monsters! Well, Maybe?

    The Intercoastal, rippling surface, strong currents, a deep channel and sprawling shallows loaded with food, an open inlet into the Atlantic Ocean that is an access point for the huge predatory creatures that survive at the top of the food chain. Thatís right, how many ways can you say, ďRiver Monsters!Ē So Iím on the hunt for the kind of marine creature that can challenge a stiff rod and a strong line, make the forearms ache from the strain. (And this from a guy who got his rear handed to him to by a tiny flounder so I know what you're thinking; "this has all the makings of a hospital bill." )

    So I need all the tips you Intercoastal pros-in-the-know can offer me, and feel free to include all the pokes and jabs you want because a little humor is always good for the soul.

    What huge species can I expect to catch in the Intercoastal & what's the best way to go after them?

    PS: I've gone with bigger mullet and bigger pinfish but all I'm catching is bigger rays.
    "Treasure is wherever it can be found."

  2. #2
    us
    Jul 2009
    Whiting, NJ
    Ace 250
    10,503
    1045 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Re: River Monsters! Well, Maybe?

    When I was a kid we used to fish in the Bronx river... Never used a rod, or a reel, we used the standard neighborhood arsenal of M-80's. Booom, and all the little fish-ies would float to the top and we would net them

  3. #3
    Charter Member
    um
    Jul 2004
    South Florida Cesspool
    Tesoro Sand Shark, Whites M6
    17,719
    9855 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Re: River Monsters! Well, Maybe?

    Mangrove snapper, snook, jacks, tarpon, barracuda, sheepshead, redfish and even big sharks wander throughout the intra coastal waterway.
    Too much to type so i'll cut & paste a little of my favorite intracoastal fish of which i'm embarrassed to say that I haven't fished for in over a year,
    Snook-
    The best snook bite is usually within an hour or two either side of sundown. Live shrimp, mullet or pilchards are the bait of choice for snook. Snook are a very cunning fish that live in the shallow waters around jeddies, dock and piers and areas of good bottom structure. Snook are cautious fish and eat only when you entice them with something they just canít do without. Shrimp are their favorite food and make up much of their diets. Shrimp typically bury themselves during the day and rise up to the surface at sundown to feed. When the snook are around, they are looking for some tasty shrimp to go floating by.

    A big side note though- the regulations are constantly changing it seems like with this species so check before you decide to keep one because they do have a "season" and you do need a stamp.

    Here's a little more cut & paste info-

    Barre none, Snook is the best fish in the world to catch. That's my personal opinion. To me, it's one of the best tasting fish out there.

    Snook is also one of the most regulated fish as well. When I was in law enforcement, I think I saw guys do more time for illegal snook fishing than I did for armed robbery! ( That aint no lie! )

    In Florida, the law forbids ANY kind of commercial fishing for this species of fish. They also regulate specific seasons, size limits, and bag limits. If you violate ANY law on these fish, you will go to jail, possibly have your vehicle or boat confiscated, and face heavy fines. So you have to be careful about that.

    Snook are an ambush fish. They like to spring out from cover and attack their prey. Use this to your advantage, and you will catch them.

    I used to find snook in the mangrove trees along the banks of salt-water rivers, as well as in the inlets, and along jetties on the ocean. You were permitted to catch and keep any snook over 23 inches........bag limit of 2 per day. You measured the fish from the snout to the "V" in the tail. If you were even a fraction of an inch off in your measurement, you might go to jail that day. So make sure you bring a measuring tape with you and be on the safe side.

    My rig for snook was a medium rod and reel, loaded with 30lb test line. Connected to that line was a swivel and 18" of 20lb monofilament leader, and a "snook hook" on the end. The lead weight you would use would be connected to the swivel, and the size would be determined by how fast the current was where you were fishing.

    The object is to have the lead weight sit on the bottom, and "float" your bait above it.

    Preferred bait was a live large shrimp, hooked between the "horns", to keep it just that......alive. You wanted it kicking. You would also need a bait bucket that had an air supply to it to keep the shrimp alive. You can also catch snook on a fly rod, but I never got into that.

    When a snook strikes, expect the fight of your life. This is what makes snook fishing so popular, almost an addiction in Florida.


    I repeat- A big side note though- the regulations are constantly changing it seems like with this species so check before you decide to keep one because they do have a "season" and you do need a stamp.



  4. #4
    us
    Jul 2009
    Whiting, NJ
    Ace 250
    10,503
    1045 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Re: River Monsters! Well, Maybe?

    diggummup, would M-80's work on Snooks too If so, I'm in

  5. #5
    us
    Feb 2008
    Morgantown,WV
    Bounty Hunter Landstar
    4,618
    1000 times

    Re: River Monsters! Well, Maybe?

    Quote Originally Posted by spartacus53
    diggummup, would M-80's work on Snooks too If so, I'm in
    DuPont spinners work the best for all species .
    Wolfpack forever

  6. #6
    us
    manaloneblog.wordpress.com

    Jun 2010
    Wherever there be treasure!
    An older blue Excal with connector, remote, Skullie headphones, and various coils. Got rid of the rest of my machines.
    13,981
    8631 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Re: River Monsters! Well, Maybe?

    Thanks Diggum! I'll keep the rigging in mind. I've always wanted to tackle a big snook on a fly rod. Have to check out the regs but someone told me a while back that you're only allowed one now and it's a very tight slot and short season. But snook are certainly on my list. I have a few leads on the Tarpon and I hope to give that a run later this summer, and I've already fooled around with some smaller sharks on the coast and over at the inlet. (Gonna need bigger tackle before I take a shot at the bigger fellas.)
    "Treasure is wherever it can be found."

  7. #7
    Charter Member
    us
    WolfPack member

    Aug 2009
    New Hampshire
    Garret Master hunter Cx Plus
    12,824
    7951 times
    The Truth

    Re: River Monsters! Well, Maybe?

    It might not be the big ones you have to look out for, theres been piranha caught before in floridas waters. I dont think you would want one of the bigger ones latching onto a finger,aka the flounder incident .You would be minus a finger. Piranha teeth and jaws are strong enough to gouge stainless steel surgical instruments

 

 

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