Strong evidence Mars has streams of salt water in summertime
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  1. #1

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    Strong evidence Mars has streams of salt water in summertime

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) – Mars appears to have flowing streams of salty water, at least in the summer, scientists reported Monday in a finding that could have major implications for the possibility of life on the planet.

    Scientists in 2008 confirmed the existence of frozen water on Mars. But the latest observations from an instrument aboard NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter strongly support the longtime theory that salt water in liquid form flows down certain Martian slopes each summer, according to the researchers.

    "Mars just got more interesting," NASA said via Twitter before holding a news conference at its Washington headquarters. The space agency called the results "a major science finding."

    Because water is essential to life, the findings could boost the notion of life on Mars. The researchers said in the journal Nature Geoscience that further exploration is warranted to determine whether any microscopic life exists on the planet.

    The evidence of flowing streams consists of dark, narrow streaks on the surface that tend to appear and grow during the warmest Martian months and fade the rest of the year.

    Mars is extremely cold even in summer, and the streaks are in places where the temperature has climbed above minus-10 degrees Fahrenheit. But salt can lower the freezing point of water and melt ice.

    The source of the water is still a mystery. Scientists noted it could be melting ice, an underground aquifer, water vapor from the thin Martian atmosphere, or some combination.

    The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter which has been circling the red planet since 2006.

    The lead author of the research paper, Lujendra Ojha, is from Georgia Institute of Technology.


    The dark streaks in this picture are up to a few hundred metres in length (Credit: NASA/ JPL/ University of Arizona)
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    Analysed using a new technique, the satellite gathered data has found that the gullies contain salt minerals left over from briny water flowing down the slopes, and which are not present in the surrounding terrain.
    The US based scientists involved in the research, which is published in the journal Nature Geoscience, say the "results strongly support the hypothesis that seasonal warm slopes are forming liquid water on contemporary Mars."
    Mars is a cold barren desert today but is thought to have been warmer and wetter billions of years ago, with a thicker atmosphere, rivers and oceans.
    Much of the planet's water is believed to have evaporated into space, but some remains locked in the polar icecaps and possibly in pockets underground.
    It is not yet clear where the water found by this study is coming from.
    One theory is that it may be absorbed from the atmosphere by the salt.
    While others think it may be the result of melting ice just under the surface or seasonal discharges from local aquifers.
    The discovery will heighten speculation about the probability of life being present on Mars.
    Back on Earth, life has been found to exist in the most harsh of locations, provided water is there too.
    The discovery also has implications for the chance of success for future human exploration of the planet, as the water could potentially be used for fuel and the survival of astronauts.
    At four locations, Palikir Crater, Horowitz Crater, Hale Crater, and Coprates Chasma - a huge Martian canyon - they found evidence of RSL salt deposits.
    The most common salts were magnesium perchlorate, magnesium chlorate and sodium perchlorate, all of which are consistent with flowing briny water.



    Strong evidence Mars has streams of salt water in summertime - News - News Item
    Last edited by jeff of pa; Sep 28, 2015 at 02:00 PM.

  2. #2
    us
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    Don't get me wrong , science is one of my favorite subjects . Especially in Space . But for what purpose would NASA want to colonize and produce hydrogen fuel on a barren planet ? Mining minerals ? If so , at what cost ? Seems like a huge waste of money in an economy that's already broke .

  3. #3
    gb
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    That will open up a whole new "beach and shallow water" section, but could cause friction between humans and aliens!

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    XLTer and NEPADIGGER7 like this.
    It's OK to be disappointed AFTER you dug it - as long as you never forget; that BEFORE you dug it, it had the POTENTIAL to be life changing!

  4. #4
    gb
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    and I guarantee that CASPER finds a ring, and CRUSADER finds a coin....

    and its alien ring pulls for the rest of us!
    Fletch88 and NEPADIGGER7 like this.
    It's OK to be disappointed AFTER you dug it - as long as you never forget; that BEFORE you dug it, it had the POTENTIAL to be life changing!

  5. #5

    Dec 2003
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    only reason I can think to Colonize the planet would be for a Quick exodus for the Elite,
    If the earths destruction became imminent .

    I'm not a paranoid By Nature , But What would worry me is Some Scientist wanting to bring
    that water Back here to test it for Life.

    & in turn Unwittingly release something Human Beings cant Tolerate, Since we have never
    experienced it before.
    so maybe A colony on Mars being exposed to it instead would be OK in that case.

    if we Don't hear from them again, They can have a News Conference & say oops !
    without creating Mass fear here.
    Last edited by jeff of pa; Sep 28, 2015 at 03:07 PM.
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  6. #6

    Sep 2013
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    Its not even so much of getting there its the journey. Journeys like this need new technologies and get the imagination going. New tech created via the space program enriches our lives everyday.

    Anyway, I think the next generation should be able to treasure hunt on Mars and asteroids!

    • CAT Scanners: If you have ever been treated with a CAT scanner or know of a loved one who has, you have the space program to thank for this. This cancer-detecting tech was first used to find imperfections in space components.


    • The Computer Microchip: Modern microchips descend from integrated circuits used in the Apollo Guidance Computer.

    • Cordless Tools: If you have ever picked up a cordless tool you have NASA to thank for that. Power drills and vacuum cleaners were used to drill for moon samples.


    • Ear Thermometers: Commonly used in hospitals, the technology used in the ear thermometers originated from a camera-like lens that detected infrared energy used to monitor the birth of stars.

    • Freeze-dried food: This process reduces the food weight and increases the shelf life without sacrificing the nutritional value.

    • Insulation: With winter on its way, I'm sure you can thank NASA for this one...!! Home insulation uses reflective materials that protects the spacecraft from radiation.


    • Invisible braces (teeth): Teeth-straightening is less embarrassing thanks to transparent ceramic brace brackets made from spacecraft materials.

    • Enriched baby food: NASA was experimenting with algae as a food supply for long space trips and found a component of algae has two fatty acids similar to those found in human breast milk. It led to the development of an enriched infant formula call Formulaid.

    • The Joystick: Video Game enthusiast should know about this one... The joystick was first used on the Apollo Luner Rover.


    • Light-Emitting Diodes (LED): Developed by NASA,the red light-emitting diodes were used to grow plants in space. Later this technology was developed in medical devices for muscle pain relief/relaxation, joint pain, arthritis and muscle spasms. Later generations of the technology are used to combat the symptoms of bone atrophy, multiple sclerosis, diabetic complications and Parkinson's disease.

    • Memory Foam: I'm sure we've all seen the 'mattress TV commercials' highlighting this feature. This foam was first created for aircraft seats and helmets to soften landing and impact by absorbing shock and returning to its original shape.


    • Scratch resistant lenses: Anybody who wears glasses, ski goggles, etc... can associate with this one. Astronaut helmet visor coatings make the lenses 10X more scratch resistant.

    • Shoe insoles: Cushion insoles and even the air pocket found in most athletic shoes, first originated from NASA boot designs to lessen impact by adding spring and ventilation.

    • Smoke detectors: You know that thing on the ceiling that beeps every time you open the oven...?? Turns out this lifesaving device (adjustable smoke detector) was also invented by NASA.


    • Solar energy: I'm sure we all have seen solar panels on top of buildings, houses and even on our desk calculator... Harnessing the sun's solar energy as a power source originated with the efforts of a NASA-sponsored 28-member coalition of companies, government groups, universities and non-profits to form the Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology Alliance (ERAST). Their goal (at the time) was to develop an unmanned aircraft that was able to maintain high altitude flight for days at a time... the solution: harnessing the sun's energy for power.


    • The Swimsuit: NASA used the same principles that reduce drage in space to help create the world's fastest swimsuit for Speedo. This design was rejected by some professionals for giving them an unfair advantage...

    • Powdered Lubricants: NASA scientists developed a solid oil-free lubricant capable of operating at high temperatures with increased reliability, lowered weight, reduced maintenance, lower friction, reduces emissions and increased power...

    • The water filter: I'm sure we have all used one of these things (i.e. Brita) NASA pioneered the technology to filter water and kill bacteria for water taken to space...


    • Space Blankets: Silver and lightweight and resembling a giant sheet of aluminum foil, these sci-fi looking blankets are commonly used by mountain climbers and long-distance runners... they are even given out for free at almost every marathon.


    • Land mine removal: NASA's surplus of rocket fuel is used to produce a flare that can safely destroy land mines. NASA is able to reduce propellant waste without negatively impacting the environment.

    • The Soaper Soaker: If you don't know what this is then you didn't have a childhood....
    The world's most famous squirt gun was invented by Lonnie G. Johnson, a nuclear engineer who worked for the US Air Force and NASA.


    • Flame-resistant textiles: After the tragic Apollo 1 launch that killed three astronauts in a fire, NASA developed a line of fire-resistant textiles used in space suits and vehicles. Today they are commonly used by firefighters, motor sports and other applications.

    • Thermometer Pill: NASA developed an ingestible pill in the 1980s that wirelessly monitors the astronaut's core body temperature from the inside. Today this tech is used by athletic teams and professionals to monitor and keep the players safe.

    • Conditioning equipment (work-out machines): Commonly seen and used at fitness gyms, athletic departments and by physical therapists around the world. These machines were developed by NASA to keep the astronaut physically fit and to prevent muscle atrophy in zero gravity environments.


    • Long distance telecommunications: Do you own a smartphone or ever made a long distance phone call...?? Before humans were even sent into space, NASA launched a bunch of satellites into Earth's orbit to monitor space and communicate to scientist on the ground. Overtime this technique/technology was adopted to over 200 communication satellites that connect us to our loved ones everyday...

    • Highway safety grooving: Admit it... you (like me) have driven late at night and accidentally drifted to the shoulder of the road driving over this grooving... or maybe you noticed the gooving pattern on the road when approaching a stop sign. Either way, Safety Grooving was first experimented by NASA back in the 1960s as a way to improve safety for aircraft taking off on wet runways. According to NASA, safety gooving reduced highway accidents by 85% after going into effect...
    DizzyDigger likes this.

  7. #7
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    [QUOTE=XLTer;4695711]Don't get me wrong , science is one of my favorite subjects . Especially in Space . But for what purpose would NASA want to colonize and produce hydrogen fuel on a barren planet ? Mining minerals ? If so , at what cost ? Seems like a huge waste of money in an economy that's already broke .[/QUOT



    You realize that scientific exploration is a step by step process. Look at the big picture. We learn to produce oxygen, water and grow food. Maybe not in our lifetimes, but someday, we will travel far beyond Mars. If engine technology develops a way to power a vehicle at light speed, we go sooner into the universe. It may take a thousand years or more, but interstellar travel is coming. Mankind wants to and will colonize the universe, probably encounter others and learn more than we have ever dreamed. Now, did you know that a transport company has been formed that has a 100 year goal of sending ore carriers to the moon, to Mars and maybe other places. Read about it in Popular Mechanics a couple of years ago. Dare to dream.
    We're on our way...

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by HenryWaltonJonesJr View Post
    Its not even so much of getting there its the journey. Journeys like this need new technologies and get the imagination going. New tech created via the space program enriches our lives everyday.

    Anyway, I think the next generation should be able to treasure hunt on Mars and asteroids!
    Some of this was already being tested by Bell Labs, ( AT & T ), in 50's and 60's.

  9. #9
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    Stuff We Use Everyday That Was Invented From The Space Program


    In honor of the end of NASA’s 30 Year Space Shuttle program, we came across a list of things invented as a direct result of NASA’s space program!

    Check it out!

    According to The Independent, here are 50 everyday items we use that were developed by the space program:

    1.The hand-held vacuum cleaner

    2.Air-cushioned trainers

    In the early 1980s, a process known as “blow rubber molding” was used to produce space helmets. Using this technology, former Nasa engineer Frank Rudy pitched an idea for an in-trainer shock absorber to the Nike Corporation. He envisaged a trainer with hollow soles filled with shock-absorbing material to cushion the impact of running. Rudy’s idea included a pad of interconnected air cells and the resulting trainer was called the Nike Air.

    3.Firefighter breathing apparatus

    Before 1971, the average weight of breathing apparatus was more than 30 pounds. Carrying the extra weight was so physically grueling that some firefighters opted to attack flames without any equipment. However, engineers at Nasa adapted the life-support systems used in spacesuits for use by emergency services. Four years later, experts had designed apparatus that weighed a third less and offered better fit and visibility.

    4.Blankets for marathon runners

    In 1964, Nasa developed a material capable of reflecting heat very effectively – a thin sheet of plastic coated with a metallic reflecting agent, usually gold or silver in color. Used as a blanket, it reflects about 80 per cent of the wearer’s body-heat back to them. It’s used to keep accident victims warm, and by marathon runners after the finish.

    5.Safer runways

    Nasa researchers discovered that cutting thin grooves across concrete runways reduces the risk of an aircraft aquaplaning after landing. Excess water drains along the grooves, increasing tire friction in wet conditions. The expertise has been adopted by airport operating authorities around the world.

    6.Pill transmitters

    Pill transmitters swallowed by astronauts to check their temperature and blood pressure are undergoing trials to be used as a way to monitor the health of fetuses in the womb. These pill-shaped gadgets can be used to monitor body temperature, pressure and other vital signs.

    7.Faster racing cars

    Carbon fiber was invented by the British in the 1960s (at the Royal Aircraft Establishment, Farnborough), but was given a boost by its use in space flight. Carbon-fiber-reinforced graphite is used in the nose cone of the Space Shuttle. Strong, light and heat resistant, it is found in everything from tennis rackets to Formula One racing cars

    8.The roof of the Millennium Dome

    A flexible yet durable Teflon-coated fiberglass material was developed in the 1970s for use on astronauts’ spacesuits. Teflon-coated fiberglass is now used for the roofs of many buildings worldwide, including the Dome in London.

    9.Greenliving

    It may seem strange, but the green movement owes a debt of gratitude to the rockets that blasted off into space. Efficient solar-power technologies – in which silicon crystals grown in a laboratory convert light into electrical energy – were first developed by Nasa in the early 1980s. The same technology is now widely used by companies manufacturing solar panels.

    10.Personal storm warning system

    11.The most impressive soundbite of all time

    Neil Armstrong setting foot on the moon on 21 July 1969 was one of the most historically important moments of the 20th century. His proclamation, which was heard by radio audiences around the world – “that’s one small step for [a] man, one giant leap for mankind” – remains one of the most famous statements ever uttered.

    12.Better sunglasses

    Nasa invented a special coating using a form of diamond-like carbon to protect its astronauts’ helmets from being scratched by space particles. A modified form of this substance – which decreases surface friction and therefore reduces scratching – has since been used by many sunglasses manufacturers, including Ray-Ban, since 1988.

    13.First detailed map of another planet

    In 1971, the Mariner 9 probe arrived at Mars and beamed a total of 7,329 images of the planet back to Earth. It provided the first global map of the surface of the Red Planet, including detailed views of its system of canyons and volcanoes, Valles Marineris.

    14.The potential to preserve priceless art

    After being first tested by Nasa, “polyamides” – incredibly strong and heat-resistant polymers – have been researched by the J Paul Getty Trust, which has discovered that one in particular may protect bronze statues from corrosion.

    15.Car crash technology

    “Explosive” bolts that can be remotely detonated to destroy them were used to free the Space Shuttle from its rocket boosters on blast-off. The technology has been adapted to create quicker and more powerful equipment to cut people out of car crashes. The cutters employ the same pyrotechnic “power cartridges” used on the Shuttle.

    16.Longer golf shots

    Wilson – one of the world’s biggest golf ball manufacturers – has improved the performance of its golf balls by implementing technology used to test the aerodynamics of the Space Shuttle’s external fuel tanks. These balls have a variety of specially configured dimples, which the company claims makes them travel further than conventional balls.

    17.Plane wing-tips

    Ever seen the vertical tip at the end of an airplane wing and wondered what it is? It’s a called a winglet and was originally developed at Nasa’s Langley Research Center. The winglet produces a degree of forward thrust (to help the plane in take-off and flight), operating much like a boat sail, and reduces wingtip drag. The winglet has been in service since the 1970s, and is found on all types of aircraft.

    18.Freeze-dried meals

    Nasa developed freeze-drying technology for the food carried by the Apollo missions. After the process, the product retains 98 per cent of its nutritional value and weighs just 20 per cent of its original weight. Snacks based on this technology are exported by Nasa to many countries, with sales running to several million pounds a year.

    19.Baby food

    Through Nasa research on algae (which it was hoped could generate oxygen in space through photosynthesis), it was found that certain algae contain two essential fatty acids present in human breast milk. These acids play an key role in infants’ mental and visual development. A synthetic ingredient that contains these acids is now added to baby food in 66 countries.

    20.Warmer feet

    Battery-powered thermal boots used by skiers are adapted from designs developed to keep astronauts warm during the Apollo space programme. Rechargeable batteries are worn inside the wrist of a glove, or the sole of a ski boot, and heat is generated by a small electrical circuit.

    21.Increased understanding of the beginning of life

    In 1995 the Hubble Space Telescope beamed images of the “Pillars of Creation” – columnar clouds of gas found in the distant Eagle Nebula – back to Earth. As well as being some of the most impressive images of space, these pictures changed scientists’ understanding of the beginnings of life in the universe.

    22.’Anti-gravity’ treadmill

    British marathon runner Paula Radcliffe has a stress fracture to her left leg, but aims to compete in the Beijing Olympics. She hopes to achieve this by training on a special “anti-gravity” treadmill developed by Nasa to help astronauts exercise in space. The machine operates in a high-pressure chamber which, in effect, cuts the weight of the user.

    23.Hang gliders

    In 1957, Nasa began testing various forms of wing for its Gemini space capsules. The wings’ simplicity of design, ease of construction, along with their capability of slow flight and gentle landing characteristics, was picked up by hang-gliding enthusiasts. The hang glider the enthusiasts designed became the most successful in history and formed the basis for the more streamlined hang gliders used today.

    24.Straighter teeth

    Nitinol, an alloy used by orthodontists to wire teeth braces, was tested in satellites that needed to spring open after being folded into a rocket. Nitinol is durable and springs back into shape after bending.

    25.Heat-absorbing sportswear

    Athletes can perform more strenuous activity without becoming overheated, thanks to new sportswear inspired by the cooling systems used in astronauts’ spacesuits. The clothes have packets of heat-absorbing gel positioned near parts of the body where the most heat is emitted.

    26.Heart surgery

    Bypass surgery is not the only means for doctors to deal with a blockage in the coronary artery. Nowadays, precise lasers can be used to clean arteries with extraordinary accuracy, while not damaging the walls of blood vessels. The lasers were originally developed by Nasa to monitor gases in the atmosphere of the Earth.

    27.Life support for patients

    Project Mercury, the first US human spaceflight program, which ran from 1959 to 1963, developed sophisticated monitoring systems to track the physiological status of its astronauts. The same technology is used today in intensive care units and specialist heart units.

    28.Medicinal light- emitting diodes

    The light-emitting diode (LED) technology used in plant growth experiments on board the Space Shuttle has led to the development of hand-held LED units used for the temporary relief of muscle and joint pain, as well easing the symptoms of arthritis, stiffness, and muscle spasms. It is that hoped use of LED technology will spread to aid bone-marrow transplant patients in the near future.

    29.Artificial limbs

    Robotic technology has been used to create more dynamic artificial limbs. New foam technology – used as a shock absorber by Nasa – has brought about more natural-looking prostheses and has helped reduce wear and tear.

    30.Intelligent underwear

    A new bra developed as a space spinoff aids the detection of breast cancer by employing water flowing through tubes to cool the skin surface. When used in conjunction with thermography – a heat-detecting technique used to detect tumours – this adapted clothing, improves image resolution and makes it easier to pick up any cancers.

    31.Detection of forest fires

    Nasa fire-detection wizardry developed in the early 1990s is now used by the authorities in the USA to detect forest fires that might not be spotted soon enough on the ground, and pinpoint their location. Infrared technology identifies the extent of a fire so firefighters can be sent to the right places to tackle it.

    32.Plant research

    Nasa research into possible bases on the Moon and Mars is looking into the use of plants to provide food, oxygen and water, reducing the need for outside supplies. The research is based on hydroponics, in which plants grow in a liquid instead of in soil. It could be used in food production on Earth.

    33.Chromosome analysis

    Using Nasa image-processing technology, human chromosomes are being photographed via cameras mounted on microscopes. The images can then be digitized, allowing doctors to enhance the pictures. The technique can be used to detect infant abnormalities.

    34.Less rubbish

    Derived from technology on the Space Shuttle, a waste compactor that needs no electrical power has been developed for boats and recreational vehicles. The device has hand-operated ratchets that drive a pressure plate with a compressive force of 2,000 pounds – a more than ample amount to crush cans, for instance.

    35.Better skiing

    Nasa developed the know-how to keep spacecraft windows clear of condensation before launch by applying two thin coatings of a special detergent oil mix to them. This has since been applied to stop ski goggles, deep sea diving masks, spectacles and vehicle windows from steaming up.

    36.Better brakes

    Studies of high-temperature space materials allowed the development of more resilient and cheaper materials for brake linings. These substances are now found in truck brakes, cranes and passenger cars and make for better and more reliable braking at high speed.

    37.Improved air quality

    A US firm has created an air-quality monitoring system based on a Nasa scheme. The monitor can analyze the gases emerging from chimneys and determine the amount of individual gases present, helping to ensure that buildings meet emission standards.

    38.Life-saving heart technology

    One benefit of Nasa’s work in telemetry – wireless control of devices – has been the creation of a heart pacemaker that can be controlled remotely. With no invasive procedures, a physician communicates with the pacemaker via a wireless device held over the patient’s chest.

    39.A possible end to water shortages

    Research into using bacteria as a means to remove impurities and purify water is being still being undertaken by Nasa. The system makes use of scant resources by turning waste water from respiration, sweat and urine into drinkable liquid and it’s hoped that this could help poorer communities in developing countries.

    40.More competitive swimming

    Some of the swimsuits favored by professional swimmers utilize technology found in spacesuits. The rubber is covered with barely visible grooves that reduce friction and aerodynamic drag by modifying the flow of water over an athlete’s body. These suits are 10 to 15 per cent faster than conventional swimsuits and could give an athlete the winning edge.

    41.The self-righting life raft

    Developed for the Apollo program, the raft fully inflates in 12 seconds and is stable during extremely adverse weather conditions. The craft are now used by coastguards around the world.

    42.Home blood pressure kits

    When Alan Shepard became the first American to fly in space some 37 years ago, Nasa scientists had to invent an automatic measuring device to find out how blasting off affected the astronaut’s blood pressure. Blood-pressure kits based on this design subsequently went mainstream.

    43.Hydraulic rescue cutters

    A rescue tool used by fire departments across America uses battery technology first employed by Nasa. The cutting technology – used to free accident victims from wreckage – employs a miniature version of the power cartridges first used on the Space Shuttle and is 50 per cent lighter (and 70 per cent cheaper) than previous rescue equipment. The cutters work more quickly than conventional ones and were used in the aftermath of the 1995 Oklahoma Federal Building bombing.

    44.Satellite television

    On 10 July 1962, a television transmission showed the American flag fluttering outside a communications center in Andover, Maine. It was made possible after Nasa launched its Telstar satellite, the world’s first active communications satellite, at 4.35 that morning.

    45.Voice-controlled wheelchairs

    Voice-controlled wheelchairs make use of Nasa robot voice recognition technology and are fitted with microcomputers that can respond to oral commands. The chairs help people with severe disabilities to perform daily tasks such as turning on appliances.

    46.Mine-clearing technology

    A type of surplus rocket fuel favored by Nasa has been used to create a device that can destroy land mines safely. The gadget uses the fuel to burn a hole in the mine’s casing and to burn away the explosive contents, making it easier to clear land of mines.

    47.Long-life tires

    The technology used to make parachutes to land exploratory probes was adapted by tire companies to create tires five times stronger than steel. Such technology, pioneered for use in tires by Goodyear in the late 1970s, employs long-chain molecular structures to increase tread lives by 10,000 miles, meaning that we can all drive further for less.

    48.Eye screening

    Nasa image-processing techniques are used to detect eye problems (errors in refraction, or the bending of light on to the retina) in children. An electronic flash from a 35mm camera sends light into the child’s eyes, and an image of the patient’s optical reflexes is then produced.

    49.The personal alarm system

    The pen-sized ultrasonic transmitters used by prison guards, teachers and the elderly and disabled to signal for help is based on technology derived from space telemetry. The pen transmits a silent signal to a receiver that will display the exact location of the emergency, enabling help to be sent.

    50.The first photos of Saturn’s rings

    In 1977, the probe Voyager 1 took almost 16,000 images of Saturn, its moons and its rings. The resulting photographs detected the presence of “spokes” within the planet’s ring patterns, which led scientists to reconsider theories about their formation.

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  10. #10
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    ARC

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    I volunteer to be the first metal detectorist to detect Mars.

    :P
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  11. #11

    Dec 2003
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    I wanna detect this area

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  12. #12

    Sep 2013
    Downtown Chicago
    Fisher F2, AT Pro, Compadre, SeaHunter II, AT Gold
    976
    665 times
    Metal Detecting
    Quote Originally Posted by jeff of pa View Post
    I wanna detect this area

    Name:  pio_med.gif
Views: 140
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    If there are any pull tabs...I'll find them!
    jeff of pa likes this.

  13. #13
    us
    Dec 2014
    Deep in the woods in South Central Pa.
    Fisher CZ7 Pro
    866
    869 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    If you look at the "other" space centered projects by NASA among others you will see the "Space Navy" , "Space Marines".
    I have a very strong feeling those programs have been in place for quite a while.

    Personally I feel we already have a "base" on the moon as well as "something" on Mars.
    Do you all here honestly think anyone in the space program would ell us the truth? I don't.
    Remember what NASA stands for.
    Never A Straight Answer

    Hit
    jeff of pa likes this.

  14. #14
    us
    ARC

    Aug 2014
    Bahia Espiritu Santo de Tampa - La Florida
    JW 8X V.2 - ML X2 - VP 580
    20,102
    48499 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    I can see it now...
    I get elected to be the first person to metal detect Mars...
    And the first thing I am gonna find is an empty pack of Marlboro Reds.
    Have permission... Fill holes... Dispose of trash. - The Random Chat Thread - http://www.treasurenet.com/forums/ev...en-24-7-a.html

  15. #15
    us
    Dec 2014
    Deep in the woods in South Central Pa.
    Fisher CZ7 Pro
    866
    869 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Quote Originally Posted by AARC View Post
    I can see it now...
    I get elected to be the first person to metal detect Mars...
    And the first thing I am gonna find is an empty pack of Marlboro Reds.
    ================================================== ====
    I think it will be a "Martian Red" beer cap...
    hehheh
    Man but on the serious side. I do truly believe there is a pile of "artifacts" that would be collection worthy.
    Good stuff
    AARC likes this.

 

 
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