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  1. #16
    us
    I deal in reality

    Mar 2010
    Maryland
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Witty View Post
    i use one of those electrified fly swatters from Harbor Freight tools. They work great for popping those little pests.
    I changed mine over to 9v batteries. Now they go down in flames.Click image for larger version. 

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  2. #17
    ca
    Feb 2009
    Deus, Minelab 3030, E-Trac,
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    Carpenter bees can damage soft wood of your home, but how do you know if the bee you see is a bumble bee, honey bee, or carpenter bee – and whether you should beware its sting, protect it as an endangered pollinating species, or eliminate it to prevent damage to your home?
    Following are a comparison of the three bees, and information on the damage caused by carpenter bees and what you can do to control them.




    Carpenter Bee

    • At 1/2 to 1 inch long, most are similar in size to bumble bees, but some species can be as small as 1/4 inch long.
    • The back end of this bee’s body (abdomen) is shiny black and mostly hairless, its body parts are more distinct than those of the bumble bee
    • Some species black, green or purplish. may have various markings with minimal hairs
    • They nest in the soft wood of trees, homes and other structures
    • The male cannot sting, the female can but is unlikely to unless provoked

    Bumble Bee

    • The bumble bee is 1/2 to 1 inch long; it is stockier than the carpenter bee.
    • These bees are fuzzy, furry creatures with black and yellow bands across its body.
    • They nest underground; travel from the nest to flowers to gather pollen.

    Honey Bee

    • about 3/4 of an inch long
    • Its head and legs are black; the center of its body (thorax) is furry and pale/yellowish in color; the back end of its body (abdomen) is shiny with alternating dark and orangish/yellowish bands.



    • They nest in hives and are an endangered species.

    Carpenter Bee Damage

    To create their nests, carpenter bees bore round holes into soft wood, which they then build out with expanding tunnels and galleries, or “brood chambers.” (See below, “In the Carpenter Bee Nest,” for more on this.) The carpenter bees prefer soft woods, such as cedar, redwood and soft pines, that are at least two inches thick to enable the building out of its nest.




    Initial damage is slight, but as the bees build out their tunnels and chambers to raise successive generations, the structure of the wood can be damaged and weakened by the internal hollowing.
    In the Carpenter Bee Nest

    In the spring, the carpenter bees mate; build or expand their nests, and lay their eggs. To do so:

    • Carpenter bees bore a round hole into soft wood. For large carpenter bees, the hole is about 1/2 inch in diameter; it is much smaller for the small bees.
    • Once the hole is about an inch deep, the bee then turns its boring to follow the grain of the wood and create a tunnel, initially about 6 to 8 inches in length.
    • Along the tunnel, the bees construct “brood chambers.” Into each chamber is placed a ball of food made of pollen and nectar. Then an egg is laid in the chamber and it is sealed shut.
    • When the egg hatches, the larva feeds on the pollen/nectar mix then emerges as an adult.
    • This development can occur in about a month, or longer or shorter depending on geography and temperature. The bees can produce up to three generations during a summer, with each female depositing 6 to 8 eggs in each brood.
    • The colony will overwinter in the wood, then mate and being again the next spring – continuing to build out the tunnel and breeding chambers as the population grows.







    How Do You Know if You Have Carpenter Bees?

    The following are signs of carpenter bee infestation in wood:

    • Like carpenter ants, carpenter bees do not eat the wood (termites do eat wood). Rather, the bees excavate the tunnels, depositing the wood shavings outside the nest. This and defecation outside the tunnel openings provides evidence of carpenter bees.
    • Male carpenter bees will flit around the opening of the nest, guarding it against other flying insects and predators. Thus if numerous bees are seen around your home’s eaves, doors, windowsills, decks, shingles, etc., - where no hive is visible, it is likely that they are carpenter bees.
    • Bees will be seen early spring through late summer. During the winter, the bees will overwinter down in their nests within the wood; mate in spring, then emerge through summer to gather food. In warm, southern areas, you may see the bees year round.



    References

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  3. #18
    Charter Member
    us
    Roger

    Nov 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kray Gelder View Post
    Sounds like fun. But probably not so good within the city limits. They have infested an old greenhouse behind my house, and I'm afraid my house is next. I have been hosing them down with everything I can think of, and have reduced the population, but not entirely. They are pretty docile, but the wasps have found them, so I've got wasps and carpenter bees swarming around. Maybe the wasps will kill them off.
    Dunno never lived 'in city limits'
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  4. #19
    Charter Member
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    papa

    Feb 2017
    Georgetown, SC
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    Quote Originally Posted by pepperj View Post
    [FONT="]Carpenter bees can damage soft wood of your home, but how do you know if the bee you see is a bumble bee, honey bee, or carpenter bee – and whether you should beware its sting, protect it as an endangered pollinating species, or eliminate it to prevent damage to your home?[/FONT]
    [FONT="]Following are a comparison of the three bees, and information on the damage caused by carpenter bees and what you can do to control them.[/FONT]
    [FONT="]



    [/FONT]

    Carpenter Bee

    • At 1/2 to 1 inch long, most are similar in size to bumble bees, but some species can be as small as 1/4 inch long.
    • The back end of this bee’s body (abdomen) is shiny black and mostly hairless, its body parts are more distinct than those of the bumble bee
    • Some species black, green or purplish. may have various markings with minimal hairs
    • They nest in the soft wood of trees, homes and other structures
    • The male cannot sting, the female can but is unlikely to unless provoked

    Bumble Bee

    • The bumble bee is 1/2 to 1 inch long; it is stockier than the carpenter bee.
    • These bees are fuzzy, furry creatures with black and yellow bands across its body.
    • They nest underground; travel from the nest to flowers to gather pollen.

    Honey Bee

    • about 3/4 of an inch long
    • Its head and legs are black; the center of its body (thorax) is furry and pale/yellowish in color; the back end of its body (abdomen) is shiny with alternating dark and orangish/yellowish bands.

    [FONT="][/FONT]

    • They nest in hives and are an endangered species.

    Carpenter Bee Damage

    [FONT="]To create their nests, carpenter bees bore round holes into soft wood, which they then build out with expanding tunnels and galleries, or “brood chambers.” (See below, “In the Carpenter Bee Nest,” for more on this.) The carpenter bees prefer soft woods, such as cedar, redwood and soft pines, that are at least two inches thick to enable the building out of its nest.[/FONT]
    [FONT="]



    [/FONT]

    [FONT="]Initial damage is slight, but as the bees build out their tunnels and chambers to raise successive generations, the structure of the wood can be damaged and weakened by the internal hollowing.[/FONT]
    In the Carpenter Bee Nest

    [FONT="]In the spring, the carpenter bees mate; build or expand their nests, and lay their eggs. To do so:[/FONT]

    • Carpenter bees bore a round hole into soft wood. For large carpenter bees, the hole is about 1/2 inch in diameter; it is much smaller for the small bees.
    • Once the hole is about an inch deep, the bee then turns its boring to follow the grain of the wood and create a tunnel, initially about 6 to 8 inches in length.
    • Along the tunnel, the bees construct “brood chambers.” Into each chamber is placed a ball of food made of pollen and nectar. Then an egg is laid in the chamber and it is sealed shut.
    • When the egg hatches, the larva feeds on the pollen/nectar mix then emerges as an adult.
    • This development can occur in about a month, or longer or shorter depending on geography and temperature. The bees can produce up to three generations during a summer, with each female depositing 6 to 8 eggs in each brood.
    • The colony will overwinter in the wood, then mate and being again the next spring – continuing to build out the tunnel and breeding chambers as the population grows.

    [FONT="]



    [/FONT]



    How Do You Know if You Have Carpenter Bees?

    [FONT="]The following are signs of carpenter bee infestation in wood:[/FONT]

    • Like carpenter ants, carpenter bees do not eat the wood (termites do eat wood). Rather, the bees excavate the tunnels, depositing the wood shavings outside the nest. This and defecation outside the tunnel openings provides evidence of carpenter bees.
    • Male carpenter bees will flit around the opening of the nest, guarding it against other flying insects and predators. Thus if numerous bees are seen around your home’s eaves, doors, windowsills, decks, shingles, etc., - where no hive is visible, it is likely that they are carpenter bees.
    • Bees will be seen early spring through late summer. During the winter, the bees will overwinter down in their nests within the wood; mate in spring, then emerge through summer to gather food. In warm, southern areas, you may see the bees year round.



    [FONT="]References[/FONT]

    That's a great post, Pepperj! Informative. If one has a carpenter bee problem, one will know it. The big, fat, hairless, and shiny black bees hover about their home turf, in groups. If you get near, they dive bomb you, but don't sting ( in my experience ), but are unmistakable with the bumble bee. Twice I have had issues, my last house they were chewing on a lean-to attachment on a free standing garage, and this time are slowly boring away at this green house. We just bought the place, so it is our first spring here. No doubt, they have been established in this structure for years, because there are dozens of them flying around it. My spraying has killed many, but many remain. I never eliminated them completely at my last place. I may just tear the green house down.


    "And so the population was gradually led into the demoralising temptations of arcades, baths, and sumptuous banquets. The unsuspecting Britons spoke of such novelties as 'civilisation', when in fact they were only a feature of their enslavement." Tacitus, Roman Senator and Historian, written AD 98.

  5. #20
    Charter Member
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    papa

    Feb 2017
    Georgetown, SC
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    Quote Originally Posted by RTR View Post
    Dunno never lived 'in city limits'
    Ha ha. I envy that! The freedoms we have when living out of town are so much greater. Social responsibility, and all that. Peppering your neighbor's house with lead pellets is unpopular. I have a cousin who grew up and lived in the country, and as a teenager spent a summer with his grandmother in town. She complained about the crows that would roost in her big elm tree, raising heck, and pooping all over. Naturally, shooting them from the upstairs window seemed like a perfectly logical solution. He received a good talking to from the local police!


    "And so the population was gradually led into the demoralising temptations of arcades, baths, and sumptuous banquets. The unsuspecting Britons spoke of such novelties as 'civilisation', when in fact they were only a feature of their enslavement." Tacitus, Roman Senator and Historian, written AD 98.

  6. #21
    us
    Jan 2007
    morrisons cove = smell our dairy air
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    I thought my boys and I were the only ones to shoot boring bees with birdshot. It dont take long to empty a $10- box of ammo. Misses are few and far between.
    Kray Gelder likes this.
    No longer politically correct

  7. #22
    Charter Member
    us
    Roger

    Nov 2017
    Smith Mt. Lake Va.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kray Gelder View Post
    Ha ha. I envy that! The freedoms we have when living out of town are so much greater. Social responsibility, and all that. Peppering your neighbor's house with lead pellets is unpopular. I have a cousin who grew up and lived in the country, and as a teenager spent a summer with his grandmother in town. She complained about the crows that would roost in her big elm tree, raising heck, and pooping all over. Naturally, shooting them from the upstairs window seemed like a perfectly logical solution. He received a good talking to from the local police!
    Yeah well not much chance of hitting a "neighbors" house here. That driveway is 700ft long.That field is 25 acresClick image for larger version. 

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  8. #23
    us
    Jan 2012
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    Metal Detecting
    Maybe it’s just down here, but Most all the farms and farmers around here have Carpenter Bee traps hanging around our barns and houses. They work very good. You can look up carpenter bee traps and build them yourself. The trick is just knowing how to dril a 45 degree hole in your trap. Easy and effective!!!
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  9. #24
    Charter Member
    us
    Nov 2010
    The Great Southwest
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    Quote Originally Posted by pepperj View Post
    Bumble Bee

    • The bumble bee is 1/2 to 1 inch long; it is stockier than the carpenter bee.
    • These bees are fuzzy, furry creatures with black and yellow bands across its body.
    • They nest underground; travel from the nest to flowers to gather pollen.

    Honey Bee

    • about 3/4 of an inch long
    • Its head and legs are black; the center of its body (thorax) is furry and pale/yellowish in color; the back end of its body (abdomen) is shiny with alternating dark and orangish/yellowish bands.

    [FONT="][/FONT]

    • They nest in hives and are an endangered species.
    Honey bees are not endangered. One of the bumble bees was classed as endangered last year but no honeybees are on the list.

    There are seven Hawaiian native bees listed as endangered but no honeybees.
    Kray Gelder likes this.

  10. #25
    Charter Member
    us
    papa

    Feb 2017
    Georgetown, SC
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    Quote Originally Posted by RTR View Post
    Yeah well not much chance of hitting a "neighbors" house here. That driveway is 700ft long.That field is 25 acresClick image for larger version. 

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    RTR, that's a beautiful piece of land you have there!
    RTR likes this.


    "And so the population was gradually led into the demoralising temptations of arcades, baths, and sumptuous banquets. The unsuspecting Britons spoke of such novelties as 'civilisation', when in fact they were only a feature of their enslavement." Tacitus, Roman Senator and Historian, written AD 98.

  11. #26
    us
    Mar 2013
    Upstate NY
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    I got a painting business ,swat them with a paint brush full of paint . They don't fly to good with coat of paint
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  12. #27
    us
    Jul 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by sawmill man View Post
    When all my little nephews come around i give them the badminton rackets , keeps the bees and kids occupied , for just about all day.
    That is what I use.
    Marvin
    Kray Gelder likes this.
    From the Redneck dictionary-----------un·der·tak·er | \ˌən-dər-ˈtā-kər,
    The last person to see you Naked.
    Beep, Beep.

  13. #28
    Charter Member
    us
    Jan 2006
    SE Louisiana
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    My late FIL had made a bunch of swatters with a long piece of shoe molding and hardware cloth to resemble a large fly swatter. The bees were destroying the out buildings around the farm. In my coop building, it was in eaves...I would always stuff something in the holes. They are destructive.
    Kray Gelder likes this.





  14. #29
    us
    Mar 2010
    326
    18 times
    no not effective over about 1 ft

 

 
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