Amazing Colonial Spot... Covered in Poison Ivy
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Thread: Amazing Colonial Spot... Covered in Poison Ivy

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  1. #1

    May 2017
    424
    1337 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Amazing Colonial Spot... Covered in Poison Ivy

    Alright, so there's this amazing, incredible, historic spot I could hunt on public land... but it's literally COVERED in poison ivy. I mean it's *crawling* with it. Everywhere. Nothing but poison ivy... as far as the eye can see.

    Bad news is, I'm allergic to poison ivy. I get it at least once a year even when I'm trying to *avoid* it, much less roll around in the stuff (I am wearing shorts and T-shirts though).

    So quick question: Is there any way to safely hunt this area? Jeans/Long-sleeve shirts/gloves? A Hazmat suit? Burn all my clothes when I'm done?

    Is there a good time of year to hunt this ground (I live in NY)? I've caught poison ivy in the winter when the plants are dead, just digging down on the roots!

    Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks!
    Kray Gelder likes this.

  2. #2
    Charter Member
    us
    papa

    Feb 2017
    Georgetown, SC
    Fisher F75
    3,773
    7233 times
    Metal Detecting
    I feel your pain. I have extreme reactions to poison ivy also. If you must detect this site, go in winter, wear rubber boots, long sleeves, gloves. Throw away the shirt and gloves. Or, by a $10 tyvek suit at home depot, and toss it when done. Where there's a will there's a way. Good luck.


    "And so the population was gradually led into the demoralising temptations of arcades, baths, and sumptuous banquets. The unsuspecting Britons spoke of such novelties as 'civilisation', when in fact they were only a feature of their enslavement." Tacitus, Roman Senator and Historian, written AD 98.

  3. #3
    1320

    Dec 2004
    East Central Kentucky
    3,304
    1988 times
    Banner Finds (1)
    Make sure it is in fact Poison Ivy. I learned this the hard way. I misidentified Boston Ivy for Poison Ivy and missed out detecting on a virgin late 1890's church site. I've never encountered large stands of Poison Ivy like you've described in my area. Boston Ivy and Box Elder look nearly identical to Poison Ivy and grow much larger stands by comparison. Unless you know for a fact you're dealing with Poison Ivy, you'll need to take a field guide to the site and get close and personal with the leaves/stems of the plant in question. The answer might surprise you. There is much more Boston Ivy and Box Elder than Poison Ivy in my neck of the woods. From a distance, Virginia Creeper looks very similar as well.

    If in fact it's Poison Ivy, I wouldn't risk it. Ivy has some serious roots and it will be a difficult proposition at best. You cut into one of those roots and accidentally sling some of that oil in your eye.....wow, that's gonna suck. And you are so right, there is no right time of year to mess with that stuff, it's always a threat.

    As previously suggested, a Tyvek suit would work but duct tape the arm/leg holes. I'd say use some goggles as well. Liberally apply a name brand anti ivy cream before suiting up.
    Kray Gelder likes this.

  4. #4
    Charter Member
    us
    papa

    Feb 2017
    Georgetown, SC
    Fisher F75
    3,773
    7233 times
    Metal Detecting
    Quote Originally Posted by 1320 View Post
    Make sure it is in fact Poison Ivy. I learned this the hard way. I misidentified Boston Ivy for Poison Ivy and missed out detecting on a virgin late 1890's church site. I've never encountered large stands of Poison Ivy like you've described in my area. Boston Ivy and Box Elder look nearly identical to Poison Ivy and grow much larger stands by comparison. Unless you know for a fact you're dealing with Poison Ivy, you'll need to take a field guide to the site and get close and personal with the leaves/stems of the plant in question. The answer might surprise you. There is much more Boston Ivy and Box Elder than Poison Ivy in my neck of the woods. From a distance, Virginia Creeper looks very similar as well

    If in fact it's Poison Ivy, I wouldn't risk it. Ivy has some serious roots and it will be a difficult proposition at best. You cut into one of those roots and accidentally sling some of that oil in your eye.....wow, that's gonna suck. And you are so right, there is no right time of year to mess with that stuff, it's always a threat.

    As previously suggested, a Tyvek suit would work but duct tape the arm/leg holes. I'd say use some goggles as well. Liberally apply a name brand anti ivy cream before suiting up.
    Good points. Here are some images I found.

    Poison Ivy...Click image for larger version. 

Name:	ivy poison ivy.jpg 
Views:	24 
Size:	1.32 MB 
ID:	1618433

    Boston Ivy...Click image for larger version. 

Name:	ivy 1 boston.jpg 
Views:	25 
Size:	183.3 KB 
ID:	1618434

    Box Elder...Click image for larger version. 

Name:	ivy 2 box elder.jpg 
Views:	31 
Size:	31.9 KB 
ID:	1618435

    Virginia Creeper...Click image for larger version. 

Name:	ivy 3 virginia creeper.jpg 
Views:	32 
Size:	2.53 MB 
ID:	1618436


    "And so the population was gradually led into the demoralising temptations of arcades, baths, and sumptuous banquets. The unsuspecting Britons spoke of such novelties as 'civilisation', when in fact they were only a feature of their enslavement." Tacitus, Roman Senator and Historian, written AD 98.

  5. #5
    1320

    Dec 2004
    East Central Kentucky
    3,304
    1988 times
    Banner Finds (1)
    Good images. Virginia Creeper in adult stage (as pictured) has 5 leaves however, in it's infant stage is has the often feared "leaves of three let it be" look.
    Kray Gelder likes this.

  6. #6

    May 2017
    424
    1337 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    All good info! Thanks everyone. I've seen all those other variants, and some of them can really take on the shiny greenish-red color of poison ivy.

    Unfortunately, I'm 100% sure it's the real deal. I might wait until everything dies, then cherry pick only the juiciest targets wearing disposable/taped everything. I didn't know there was a pre-cream I could apply also. Nice.
    Kray Gelder likes this.

  7. #7
    Charter Member
    us
    Jun 2013
    East Tennessee
    6,953
    6699 times
    You might ask the powers that be, if you can spray a Poison Ivy Killer on the property to eliminate the Poison Ivy and even Poison Oak and/or Poison Sumac if there is any of these as well. They may be happy that you would take on the job at no cost to them which will eliminate most of these problem plants. Come back every two weeks to ensure that none are coming back but if they are, continue your spraying program until it all has been eliminated. Once Fall or Winter comes around, then you will hopefully not have any problems but it would still be best to wear good boots, rain pants that snap around the tops of the boots, long sleeve shirts and/or coat and thin but sturdy rubber gloves that will come up over the sleeves of your' shirt. When you get home after each time out digging, throw everything except the boots in the wash. Good luck!
    Kray Gelder and 1320 like this.

 

 

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