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Thread: Can anyone ID this plant?

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  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by IMAUDIGGER View Post
    OH - a farmer...they are responsible for the destruction of biodiversity...clear cutting the forest, plowing the ground allowing sediment to enter the streams, pouring round-up, 2-4-D and fertilizer all over the place....never mind if they have belching cattle.

    Just kidding.
    I know the huge benefit farmers generally provide to wildlife (at least around here).
    Technically I’m not a farmer, although I do help my father-in-law. Yes, commercial agriculture causes problems, but the alternative is a bunch of hangry people. I’m actually a restoration ecologist. I helped reforest a little more than 1 square mile last year with around 400,000 trees, although it was spread across several states. I also gave away approximately 12,000 trees last year and dabble in native plant propagation and small habitat improvement projects. I’d like to do more, but it will take some time to raise the funding. Over the past 4 years, I’d say that we put in over a million trees. In a few years, I hope to do 5 million or more annually. I routinely use 2,4-D, glyphosate, and occasionally triclopyr and some other herbicides both for my work and around the farms. They’re a necessary tool for some of our projects to beat back the exotic, invasive species so that I can replace them with native plants.

    Kindest regards,
    Kantuck
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  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kantuckkeean View Post

    Some of my colleagues believe that the Great Barrier Reef and other reefs around the world are already doomed and that it’s just a matter of time before they are completely destoryed. Personally, I don’t see the humor in the degradation of ecosystems. It breaks my heart because I’ve been snorkeling and I have seen the beauty of a coral reef. I’ve always wanted to see the Great Barrier Reef and my family and I may not get a chance. Personally, I’m not professing doomsday just yet, although we are either at, or very near the tipping point and I feel that we will not curb our fossil fuel use quickly enough to avoid serious consequences to many ecosystems. That is what the models are showing. The time has come to seriously consider geoengineering techniques while continuing to reduce our dependence on fossil fuels and consumption of natural resources.
    I don't think of climate change as a political issue either. As somebody who loves the outdoors and being outside, I just want to keep it looking nice and healthy, regardless of anything political. I would say that the coral reefs are the biggest indicators of climate change. I read somewhere that nearly half of the coral reefs have already bleached and/or died, or started to bleach. It is very startling to see the difference between photos of the same coral reef, taken 30 years or so apart. Ocean acidification is also becoming a problem in the oceans. In my opinion, once the oceans start to be affected, it isn't long before you will start seeing signs on land.


    Back on the original topic of the thread.
    Has anyone ever dealt with bittersweet before, that is a plant that is truly evil. It killed a 20 year old lilac tree in my backyard, and continued to spread elsewhere, growing back every single year no matter how close to the roots I cut it.
    Last edited by coinman123; Oct 19, 2018 at 11:17 PM.
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  3. #33

    Mar 2016
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kantuckkeean View Post
    Technically I’m not a farmer, although I do help my father-in-law. Yes, commercial agriculture causes problems, but the alternative is a bunch of hangry people. I’m actually a restoration ecologist. I helped reforest a little more than 1 square mile last year with around 400,000 trees, although it was spread across several states. I also gave away approximately 12,000 trees last year and dabble in native plant propagation and small habitat improvement projects. I’d like to do more, but it will take some time to raise the funding. Over the past 4 years, I’d say that we put in over a million trees. In a few years, I hope to do 5 million or more annually. I routinely use 2,4-D, glyphosate, and occasionally triclopyr and some other herbicides both for my work and around the farms. They’re a necessary tool for some of our projects to beat back the exotic, invasive species so that I can replace them with native plants.

    Kindest regards,
    Kantuck
    And I thought I was doing some good by planting a couple hundred trees.
    Thousands of 5 gallon buckets of water lugged around to get them started!!

    Lost 30 acres to a fire that had a bunch of trees that I watered for 3 years.

    I try and plant trees each year. Half of them eventually die or are stunted.

    A bare root w/cage and bamboo stick is about $3 around here.
    Nobody is paying me. Everyone just complains...that’s it.

    Tonight I bought an apple tree and two peach trees. I’m sure they will end up feeding deer more than myself, but I enjoy seeing things grow.

    Picking up 100 conifer trees as soon as the temps start getting closer to freezing.

    You don’t have to be an “ist” to want to improve the land.
    Last edited by IMAUDIGGER; Oct 19, 2018 at 11:40 PM.
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  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by coinman123 View Post
    I don't think of climate change as a political issue either. As somebody who loves the outdoors and being outside, I just want to keep it looking nice and healthy, regardless of anything political. I would say that the coral reefs are the biggest indicators of climate change. I read somewhere that nearly half of the coral reefs have already bleached and/or died, or started to bleach. It is very startling to see the difference between photos of the same coral reef, taken 30 years or so apart. Ocean acidification is also becoming a problem in the oceans. In my opinion, once the oceans start to be affected, it isn't long before you will start seeing signs on land.


    Back on the original topic of the thread.
    Has anyone ever dealt with bittersweet before, that is a plant that is truly evil. It killed a 20 year old lilac tree in my backyard, and continued to spread elsewhere, growing back every single year no matter how close to the roots I cut it.
    I spoke with a naturalist at one of the state parks in northern Indiana last week and I inquired about oriental bittersweet control, since I have not yet seen it in my area, but know that it is in close proximity to some of our projects. He said cut stump treatment is what he’s mostly doing. I asked what he was using, thinking possibly triclopyr. He said that he used glyphosate “at a true 25% concentration.” Basically, cut the stem with pruners or loppers close to the ground, and use a small sprayer to spray some glyphosate on the cut so that it wipes out the roots. With glyphosate and this technique, you have to apply the glyphosate within minutes of making the cut.

    He also said that for small, low-growing bittersweet, foliar application of glyphosate works. I assumed that he probably used standard 2% glyphosate and 1% v/v soybean oil surfactant for the foliar application, since the leaves are fairly waxy and he didn’t say any special instructions.

    I buy generic glyphosate at 41% for approximately $40.00/2.5 gal. So if I run into oriental bittersweet, I’ll probably try cutting it in half to 20.5%. If it’s not effective at that rate, I’ll bump it up to 25%.

    You can buy Accord at 50.2% glyphosate and cut it in half but in a 2.5 gal jug, it’s about twice the cost of the generic stuff that I get.

    Here’s the NRCS fact sheet on oriental bittersweet, which recommends glyphosate or triclopyr. Be careful if you go with triclopyr. It’s more mobile in soil than glyphosate and can penetrate bark, so you can easily cause damage or kill non-target plants if you get it on the stem. The NRCS fact sheet is also recommending the ester formulation of triclopyr, and esters are typically more volatile than amine formulations, and if it volatilizes, it could also damage or kill non-target vegetation. Accord and generic glyphosate will be the isopropyl amine formulation. Be sure to read and follow label instructions and use proper personal protective equipment.

    https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/Internet/F...4p2_015111.pdf

    Kindest regards,
    Kantuck
    Last edited by Kantuckkeean; Oct 20, 2018 at 12:53 AM.
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  5. #35
    us
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    Quote Originally Posted by IMAUDIGGER View Post
    And I thought I was doing some good by planting a couple hundred trees.
    Thousands of 5 gallon buckets of water lugged around to get them started!!

    Lost 30 acres to a fire that had a bunch of trees that I watered for 3 years.

    I try and plant trees each year. Half of them eventually die or are stunted.

    A bare root w/cage and bamboo stick is about $3 around here.
    Nobody is paying me. Everyone just complains...that’s it.

    Tonight I bought an apple tree and two peach trees. I’m sure they will end up feeding deer more than myself, but I enjoy seeing things grow.

    Picking up 100 conifer trees as soon as the temps start getting closer to freezing.

    You don’t have to be an “ist” to want to improve the land.
    We’re in different parts of the country, or I could get you a better groundcover than Vinca. I can’t ship to western states, and wouldn’t, for fear of spreading pathogens.

    You should look look into the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service and FSA. NRCS provides technical and ​financial assistance to private landowners who are implementing conservation practices that will benefit society on their properties. They started as the Soil Conservation Service during the Dust Bowl to get farmers to practice no-till agriculture and install stream buffers and shelterbelts. They now do all kinds of things, from supporting water quality projects (e.g. stream buffer plantings, providing financial assistance for fencing to keep livestock out of streams, et al.) to developing forest management plans and providing funding for native plant restoration and tree plantings. Might be worth your while.

    Oh, and you are doing good. Keep planting native trees and plants, especially in areas where they belong.

    And in in case you were wondering... I don’t work for the government, even though I mentioned NRCS in my last two replies in this thread. They just have some good resources.

    Kindest regards,
    Kantuck
    Last edited by Kantuckkeean; Oct 20, 2018 at 02:05 PM.
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  6. #36

    Mar 2016
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    I’ve looked at the NRCS programs. There are always strings attached when you accept funding.
    I’d rather go it alone.
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  7. #37
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    Jun 2013
    East Tennessee
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    It seems that we and all of the Climate Experts have it wrong about climate change! Of course if you were to believe this Tudor Watch commercial, the All Blacks, the three-time Rugby world champions from New Zealand are responsible. It seems that every time they do the haka, the Maori War challenge, something bad happens climate-wise across the world.

    Last edited by huntsman53; Oct 22, 2018 at 10:30 AM.

  8. #38
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    Y'all come visit me and I will give you some KUDZU sprouts------------------Guaranteed to smother your PERIWINKLE.
    Marvin
    From the Redneck dictionary-----------un·der·tak·er | \ˌən-dər-ˈtā-kər,
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  9. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by GA_Boy View Post
    Y'all come visit me and I will give you some KUDZU sprouts------------------Guaranteed to smother your PERIWINKLE.
    Marvin
    Looked it up. Dam!! Insane.
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  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by IMAUDIGGER View Post
    Looked it up. Dam!! Insane.
    Yep. Kudzu is ridiculous. Completely draping entire swaths of forest. I’ve seen some large patches of it in Kentucky and in more southern states. I’m glad that I don’t have it on my property. After 7 years, I’ve about got the Canada thistle, multiflora rose, poison hemlock, garlic mustard, and honeysuckles under control.

    Kindest regards,
    Kantuck
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  11. #41
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    Back in the day we had a little Mini-farm and the Wife had 12-15 goats fenced where the Kudzu was and the Goats devoured it like a child does candy.
    Marvin
    From the Redneck dictionary-----------un·der·tak·er | \ˌən-dər-ˈtā-kər,
    The last person to see you Naked.
    Beep, Beep.

  12. #42
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    it is kind of the yankee version of Kudzu. Don't put it in your yard, you may regret doing so.

    other home site indicator plants are daffodils, yucca plants, cedar trees or any other group of flowering plants that appear out of place from the native plants common in your woods. Also any plants, shrubs, tree planted in lines or sharp angles. Nature does not do that.
    Kantuckkeean likes this.

  13. #43
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    I have heard goats will eat damn near anything. I also heard that cows and horses will not eat kudzu. Kudzu eats fences, buildings, old cars, any kind of tree or bush. basically they eat everything. in middle and south GA I have been told kudzu will grow 1 foot per day.
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  14. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by pulltabfelix View Post
    it is kind of the yankee version of Kudzu. Don't put it in your yard, you may regret doing so.

    other home site indicator plants are daffodils, yucca plants, cedar trees or any other group of flowering plants that appear out of place from the native plants common in your woods. Also any plants, shrubs, tree planted in lines or sharp angles. Nature does not do that.
    In addition to daffodils, lilacs, apple trees, periwinkle, or other plants that are out of place, the form of trees can be another indicator of an old house site. Forest-grown trees compete against each other for light and space and are, generally speaking, self-thinning and self-pruning. Competing trees lose their lower branches as they get shaded from above, so that they can put more resources into height growth and they develop a straight, narrow trunk (think of towering, timber-form trees). Open-grown trees aren’t competing for light or space and develop a shorter, more spreading form and since they aren’t competing for light or space, they retain their lower branches... Envision a beautiful, mushroom-shaped oak or maple with a suspended bench swing in front of an old home. If you’re in the woods and see a few trees with unusually large diameters and spreading forms, surrounded by, and likely being overtopped by a forest of timber-form trees with similar, but much smaller diameters, you may be near the remains of an old structure that has been reclaimed by the forest.

    Kindest regards,
    Kantuck
    Last edited by Kantuckkeean; Oct 23, 2018 at 08:57 PM.
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  15. #45
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    Mr.

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    A totally awesome read!
    Thank you all for your input, it surely helps me not to lose confidence in my fellow man.
    When I read that the oceans are now echoing with life reduction of some 40% in the last 30-40 years, and land species disappearing by the hundreds, I cry.
    People need to somehow start coming out of their "denial attitudes" and start making a difference by just taking a small step for mankind right in their own surroundings rather than just brushing aside the actual happening and in process demolition of our world in all its diversity because it hasn't affected them yet.
    Hats off gentlemen, I applaud your love for this world, and hope it is contagious.
    I am trying also by not poluting through use of solar, sun heat storage and using just about any measure to make my stay here unnoticed by nature.
    Not able to do that 100%, but I have help...., the few like yourselves. Thank you. EB
    In due time you'll find that it would have taken less effort to follow up on advice than it takes to find out you really ARE wrong most of the time.

 

 
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