Newer Isnt Always Better
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Thread: Newer Isnt Always Better

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  1. #1
    us
    Feb 2006
    Brownwood, Texas
    Garrett Scorpion Gold Stinger, Garrett Ace 350, Garrett Ace 250, Garrett Deepseeker, Dowsing Rods
    1,120
    1203 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Newer Isn't Always Better

    While I was at our Brownwood Public Library today, I decided to check out their computer card catalog for books about "treasure". I was surprised to find several on the subject that are decades old. I read most of them many years ago. I checked out 3 of them for old time's sake - "Let's Talk Treasure Hunting" (1994) by Charles Garrett, "The Complete Guide to Treasure Hunting" (1973) by Norman Carlisle and David Michelsohn, and "Treasure Hunting Around the World" (1960) by Thomas Helm.
    Long before the Internet came along, these old books, treasure and old western magazines, and treasure hunting newsletters got me hooked on this amazing hobby. The Internet was a revolutionary marvel but when it comes to treasure hunting, it's really a pitiful failure. Sure, it's packed with videos and forums about modern metal detecting but it mostly dwells on smaller treasures like individual pieces of jewelry, old relics and coins, and, of course, who has the latest, most complicated, and most expensive metal detector and other modern and bothersome accessories. Don't get me wrong, I love hunting for these smaller treasures too. In fact, I go out seeking them almost every day when the weather is nice but there's nothing that gets my blood pumping faster than to read about searches for legendary lost treasures or the recovery of a post hole bank or buried and lost cache of gold and/or silver coins. The Internet is sorely lacking in these types of stories and it's almost useless for researching them.
    I feel a bit sorry for younger treasure hunters or those who have just gotten into this hobby, in the last 20 or 30 years, who have never been exposed to the people and the treasures that gave rise to metal detecting and "modern" treasure hunting in the first place. The best I can do for the younger th'ers (as we used to call ourselves) and late arrivals is to regularly tell them about or post about the good ole days of treasure hunting and encourage them to take time to look back and study the beginnings of this healthy and fun pastime. I guarantee that you'll benefit greatly from doing so. Also, visit your local library and see what books they have available on old school treasure hunting. You may be amazed at what you find and what you learn.
    ~Texas Jay

    http://centraltexastreasureclub.webs.com
    Name:  TreasureHuntingAroundtheWorld - Thomas Helm.jpg
Views: 212
Size:  11.0 KB
    Icewing, GB1, rook3434 and 5 others like this.

  2. #2
    Charter Member
    us
    WolfPack member

    Aug 2009
    New Hampshire
    Garret Master hunter Cx Plus
    12,824
    7956 times
    The Truth
    I've been telling people here for quite a while to invest in books.LOL

  3. #3
    us
    Knowledge in machine struck coinage and colonial through 1800's Relics.

    Feb 2013
    New England, Somewhere Metal Detecting in the Woods
    Teknetics T2 SE (DST) Spare Teknetics T2 SE (backup) 15" T2 coil Pro-Pointer Bounty Hunter Pioneer 202 Fisher F2 Fisher F-Point
    4,654
    5697 times
    Coins and Relics
    Banner Finds (2)
    Honorable Mentions (1)
    Great thread. As a new arrival to the hobby in 2013, I wasn't able to live through the golden era of metal detecting, alongside the names of treasure hunters that most of us still know today. I did end up buying a few books though, about great metal detecting treasures found, and I enjoy reading magazines such as Western and Eastern Treasures (and writing for them sometimes). I also highly recommend getting the book "A Guide To Artifacts Of Colonial America", a classic book for any relic hunter, that has helped me identify finds on many occasions. You can never have enough material about the hobby, and books are probably the best way to immerse yourself in metal detecting. I find that the library normally has a bunch of metal detecting books from the golden era of the hobby, I checked out a good amount of them over the years. Reading about amazing caches and hoards found always gave me the urge to go metal detecting.

    While there are still some great new metal detecting books made today, there are hardly as many and they don't seem to contain the same amount of excitement as the old ones do. Still, I would say that the greatest improvement to the hobby in the past 20 years, besides new metal detector technology, would have to be the invention of internet forums, particularly TreasureNet. I know that TreasureNet helped get me, and probably countless others into the hobby. Much like those books did for new metal detectorists before the internet, seeing all the great stuff posted on here made me want to go out and try to find some treasure for myself and kept me from giving up when I found nothing.
    Last edited by coinman123; Dec 21, 2018 at 09:38 PM.
    2014-2017 Finds
    1700s Sundial
    165? french liard
    1696 1774 1730s 17?? copper
    1723 irish penny
    1730 KG coin toy
    2x AU 1803 LC
    1722 1/2 Penny
    1779, 1781 Real, ? 1 Real
    NJ Copper 1786
    1805,1838 LC
    26 Coppers 17 colonial
    175 1720-1850 buttons
    40 Musket Balls
    1906 1912 1934 dog Lics
    16 1700s Buckles 1 silver
    2 1700s spigot
    3 Thimbles 1 silver
    Cleaning Finds:
    http://www.treasurenet.com/forums/ge...ns-relics.html

  4. #4
    Charter Member
    us
    Oct 2014
    Massachusetts
    Garrett: AT Pro, AT Gold & Infinium; Minelab: Explorer SE, II & X-terra 705; Tesoro: Tejon & Outlaw; White's: V3i & DFX
    25,733
    27352 times
    Relic Hunting
    Banner Finds (2)
    IMHO: There are a lot of good books on Metal Detecting, Colonial coins, Cobs, Relics...etc. They are all a treasure trove of knowledge!

  5. #5
    Charter Member
    us
    Tommy

    Dec 2015
    Ann Arbor
    Equinox 800
    23,175
    29414 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Honorable Mentions (2)
    I have many many copies of treasure lost and treasure found and some books from Charles Garret very motivating to say the least!!!!Great post

    Approved TreasureNet Stickers

    .:: $3.00 for 11" X 3" Bumper Sticker ::.
    .:: $2.25 for 1" x 4" Detector Sticker ::.
    (Free Shipping)


    SEE: TreasureNet Bumper Stickers

  6. #6

    Feb 2017
    Santa Barbara,Ca
    Bounty Hunter Prospector Fisher CZ6A
    286
    1615 times
    Metal Detecting
    When bought my last detector the guy gave me three old Treasure Hunter magazines. A 1976 ,1986 and 1988. I love reading them over and over. Reading the advertisements its AMAZING how far technology has come !

  7. #7
    Charter Member
    us
    Coin Rescue Tech

    Jun 2014
    Northern O-H-I-O
    F75 LTD, 1280X Aquanaut, & an F2 (loaner)
    11,547
    17012 times
    Metal Detecting
    Banner Finds (1)
    My town library does not have any books regarding treasure hunting, but they do have many on the history of the town and region which give me insight as to where I might want to detect for particular artifacts. I am not originally from this area, but believe I know more about it's history than most lifelong residents.
    Rescuing Coins 1 Beep at a time

  8. #8
    Charter Member
    us
    WolfPack member

    Aug 2009
    New Hampshire
    Garret Master hunter Cx Plus
    12,824
    7956 times
    The Truth
    People are usually ignorant of there own home town,city,history.One hard to find fact of where I grew up was first blood of the revolution was drawn there,not in Lexington or concord.

  9. #9
    Charter Member
    us
    DEPLORABLE

    Jul 2015
    Port Allegheny, Pennsylvania
    E-trac, Excalibur, XP Deus, & CTX 3030.
    21,200
    20872 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Honorable Mentions (1)
    Spent a lot of time in the Vault in the Flagship Branch of the NYC Public Library. It is located at 42nd street and 5th Ave. It is called the Vault because most of the books kept in this climate controlled section of the library were very rare and were kept under lock and key. They could not be signed out and no tracing was allowed. We didn't have cell phones back then and even if we did, picture taking was frowned upon. Slowly but surely, the information in those books were being fed into the computer. That was back in the 70's and 80's. I must have over a hundred treasure related books in my personal library plus loose leaf books full of my own research. Yep, I'm happy that I was able to get my hands on this information but I am also happy that it is easier to gather information today with the use of a personal computer.
    Loco-Digger and Texas Jay like this.
    SOMETIMES I WISH I DIDN'T KNOW NOW ,,, WHAT I DIDN'T KNOW THEN,, Bob Seger

  10. #10
    us
    Feb 2006
    Brownwood, Texas
    Garrett Scorpion Gold Stinger, Garrett Ace 350, Garrett Ace 250, Garrett Deepseeker, Dowsing Rods
    1,120
    1203 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Quote Originally Posted by against the wind View Post
    Spent a lot of time in the Vault in the Flagship Branch of the NYC Public Library. It is located at 42nd street and 5th Ave. It is called the Vault because most of the books kept in this climate controlled section of the library were very rare and were kept under lock and key. They could not be signed out and no tracing was allowed. We didn't have cell phones back then and even if we did, picture taking was frowned upon. Slowly but surely, the information in those books were being fed into the computer. That was back in the 70's and 80's. I must have over a hundred treasure related books in my personal library plus loose leaf books full of my own research. Yep, I'm happy that I was able to get my hands on this information but I am also happy that it is easier to gather information today with the use of a personal computer.
    The problem is that very little of what I've learned from reading old history-related books can be found online but it does significantly help in finding the books I want to read.
    ~Texas Jay
    Loco-Digger likes this.

 

 

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