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Thread: Survival Tips for Treasure Hunters

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  1. #16
    us
    Jul 2018
    Mountains of Western Colorado
    Garrett, General Mathematics, Geometry,Crystal ball,Noggin
    1,255
    2187 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    I got rid of my sat phone and went with the Garmin In Reach I go way out in the mountains. It is cable of texting the people you want to keep in touch and has an emergency locator sos button on it. The sat phone had none of this and the service was very expensive.I have found the Garmin very reliable have been using it for awhile now.I am not a big fan of electronics but this unit seems to be rugged and it uses the iridium network lots of satellites to communicate with.
    Phil, AARC and SusanMN like this.
    The mountains have rules.They are harsh rules,but they are there,and if you keep to them you are safe.A mountain is not like men. A mountain is sincere. The weapons to conquer it exists inside you,inside your soul.

  2. #17
    Charter Member
    us
    ARC

    Aug 2014
    Bahia Del Espiritu Santo - "Bay of the Holy Spirit”
    JW 8X V.2 - ML X2 - VP 580
    24,352
    66176 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Quote Originally Posted by cyzak View Post
    I got rid of my sat phone and went with the Garmin In Reach I go way out in the mountains. It is cable of texting the people you want to keep in touch and has an emergency locator sos button on it. The sat phone had none of this and the service was very expensive.I have found the Garmin very reliable have been using it for awhile now.I am not a big fan of electronics but this unit seems to be rugged and it uses the iridium network lots of satellites to communicate with.
    I like the "mini"... and they make a dive case for it... which is really cool... I want a case for everything.
    Phil and cyzak like this.
    DETECT WITH RESPECT - Have permission... Fill holes... Dispose of trash. - The Random Chat Thread - http://www.treasurenet.com/forums/ev...en-24-7-a.html

  3. #18
    us
    Mike

    Jan 2007
    Oregon
    fisher 1266xb
    38
    54 times
    Beach and Shallow Water Hunting
    Great Thread!!!
    I do alot of scouting for hunting and always have a gps unit and compass with me. My camelbak is always filled with water even if it is just to go check cameras that day. Contains multiple knives, para cord, leatherman, extra batteries, firestarting materials (military compressed firestarter and pitch from a tree that is in waterproof bottle, small watertight lighter, waterproof matches and flint), marker ribbon, small first aid kit, small supply of food (almonds, smoked oysters, sunflower seeds, a couple energy bars), emergency blanket, 2 small flashlights, and a pistol in case i run into a hungry bear or cougar. Im sure im forgetting a few things but thats the jist of my items. You never know if you will be hurt and not make it back to vehicle and i always want my pack with me so at least i have basics.

    After reading posts from others i now have more items to put on the list! Thanks for starting this thread
    releventchair, Phil, AARC and 2 others like this.

  4. #19
    us
    Mike

    Jan 2007
    Oregon
    fisher 1266xb
    38
    54 times
    Beach and Shallow Water Hunting
    Also, just as someone mentioned before about learning the compass before you have to rely upon it...that goes for a gps unit as well, dont expect to just purchase one and think your good to go...they take time to learn the necessary functions to use to navigate to and from. I did alot of practice with mine on short little hikes where i was very familiar of the area so that i could be effective when i use it in an emergency situation!

  5. #20
    cr
    May 2005
    Drake, Costa Rica
    1,642
    2341 times
    from the jungle:
    never camp under a large tree
    never camp alongside a stream
    Phil likes this.

  6. #21
    Charter Member
    us
    Feb 2008
    Great Lakes State
    dirtfishing
    11,307
    3382 times
    silver surfing
    Honorable Mentions (1)
    I could eat 5 cans of Spam before I could gag on a bowl of oatmeal.
    Phil and ArfieBoy like this.

  7. #22
    cr
    May 2005
    Drake, Costa Rica
    1,642
    2341 times
    Quote Originally Posted by fistfulladirt View Post
    I could eat 5 cans of Spam before I could gag on a bowl of oatmeal.
    cold or hot?
    Phil and ArfieBoy like this.

  8. #23

    Dec 2012
    34
    59 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    FIRE STARTER

    The single most important piece of gear you carry in your daypack is fire starter. This cannot be stressed enough because fire is not only used to prevent hypothermia, it is also the best distress signal in case you are injured and unable to walk to safety.

    So which is best?

    There are many products for sale, as well as homemade fire starters, and all of them work great if you are trying to light the barbecue at home. However, will it work in 50 mph winds in a blizzard? Most don't.

    More importantly, how many fires can you start? If you are injured and need to create a signal, you will need to build THREE separate fires in a triangle (Three is the universal signal for help). And you will need to build those fires in an open area so they can be easily seen from the air, where the winds are often howling. Also, if you are not injured and you are walking to safety, you will need to build several fires along the way.

    And lastly, if you are entering the second stage of hypothermia, or a helicopter is flying nearby, when the time comes to build a fire...........You need it NOW.

    The only thing I have found that meets these criteria is a can of WD-40, paper towels, and a lighter.

    Carry the paper towels and lighters in separate zip-lock bags to keep them dry, and use one sheet for each fire. Break off dry dead limbs from a tree (Smaller than the size of a pencil), and put them over the paper towel. Spray WD-40 on it, light it, and POOF.......Instant fire. If it begins to die down, just spray more WD-40 on it until it takes off.

  9. #24
    Charter Member
    us
    ARC

    Aug 2014
    Bahia Del Espiritu Santo - "Bay of the Holy Spirit”
    JW 8X V.2 - ML X2 - VP 580
    24,352
    66176 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Quote Originally Posted by BillA View Post
    from the jungle:
    never camp under a large tree
    never camp alongside a stream
    Please elaborate.

    And... Bill.. long time since I have seen you post... hope all is well.

    .
    Phil and cyzak like this.
    DETECT WITH RESPECT - Have permission... Fill holes... Dispose of trash. - The Random Chat Thread - http://www.treasurenet.com/forums/ev...en-24-7-a.html

  10. #25
    Charter Member
    us
    Feb 2008
    Great Lakes State
    dirtfishing
    11,307
    3382 times
    silver surfing
    Honorable Mentions (1)
    Quote Originally Posted by BillA View Post
    cold or hot?
    i could probably do the cold oatmeal, first sliced...then fried in bacon grease.
    Phil likes this.

  11. #26

    Dec 2012
    34
    59 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    MAKE A PLAN AND STICK TO IT

    The next tip comes from a husband, wife, and their newborn baby from Los Angeles that visited relatives in Oregon for Christmas, and decided to take the highway along the coast on their way home.

    Like so many other stories we have all heard, the GPS told them to turn off the highway onto a gravel road that led them into the mountains. Soon thereafter, they were stuck in the snow and it was snowing. They chose to stay put and wait for help to arrive. However, when the fuel ran out a few days later, the husband decided to go for help.

    Search and Rescue found the wife and baby the next day using cell phone towers to pinpoint their location. Both survived. However, the husband's body was found less than a mile away in a ravine off the road.

    What did he do wrong?

    It could be argued he made a mistake by going for help. However, things could have turned out very differently and the mother and child could have died just as easily (Think of the guy I wrote about earlier that waited and died months later from starvation).

    The mistake was sitting around for a few days, allowing his body to become weak from lack of food, then deciding to go for help.

    In other words, stay or go? It's a 50/50 risk either way. Choose the best option given the circumstances then do it. If you choose the best course of action is to go for help, leave immediately while you still have the energy.

    And lastly.........Do not leave the road. It might look like a shortcut, but the snow is likely to be deeper when you leave road (Gravel in the road warms up and melts snow), and you can walk in the tracks made by your vehicle.
    cyzak likes this.

  12. #27
    cr
    May 2005
    Drake, Costa Rica
    1,642
    2341 times
    Quote Originally Posted by AARC View Post
    Please elaborate.

    And... Bill.. long time since I have seen you post... hope all is well.

    .
    grrrr, lost posf
    trees can be big with 8' dia branches 60-80' up, nice clearing around the base
    the son of some explorer went to hike thru Corcovado Park and a year later was found under one of these

    it can rain 6" in 15 min, and if it does so upstream....

    ffad
    if I have bacon grease I can eat horse flowers
    AARC, fistfulladirt, Phil and 1 others like this.

  13. #28
    us
    Dec 2012
    lower hudson valley, N.Y.
    safari, ATPro, infinium, old Garrett BFO, Excal, Nox 800
    3,196
    4143 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Quote Originally Posted by Phil View Post
    FIRE STARTER

    The single most important piece of gear you carry in your daypack is fire starter. This cannot be stressed enough because fire is not only used to prevent hypothermia, it is also the best distress signal in case you are injured and unable to walk to safety.

    So which is best?

    There are many products for sale, as well as homemade fire starters, and all of them work great if you are trying to light the barbecue at home. However, will it work in 50 mph winds in a blizzard? Most don't.

    More importantly, how many fires can you start? If you are injured and need to create a signal, you will need to build THREE separate fires in a triangle (Three is the universal signal for help). And you will need to build those fires in an open area so they can be easily seen from the air, where the winds are often howling. Also, if you are not injured and you are walking to safety, you will need to build several fires along the way.

    And lastly, if you are entering the second stage of hypothermia, or a helicopter is flying nearby, when the time comes to build a fire...........You need it NOW.

    The only thing I have found that meets these criteria is a can of WD-40, paper towels, and a lighter.

    Carry the paper towels and lighters in separate zip-lock bags to keep them dry, and use one sheet for each fire. Break off dry dead limbs from a tree (Smaller than the size of a pencil), and put them over the paper towel. Spray WD-40 on it, light it, and POOF.......Instant fire. If it begins to die down, just spray more WD-40 on it until it takes off.
    ZIPPO!! I always carried a faithful Zippo with extra flints up in the cotton and freshly filled they will make fire for a week or longer even in a good wind. When I was in the BSA I had a very practical scoutmaster. Besides being trained in flint and steel, bow fire makers, waterproofing strike anywhere matches, we had to carry a small bottle of what he called "boy scout water" which was either lighter fluid or kerosene. I also make fire starters by taking newspaper and rolling it tightly into about 1/2" cylinders, tie three cylinders together every three inches with cotton string and cut into 3" pieces between the strings. Then put a bunch of paraffin in an old coffee can, melt the paraffin and soak the tied newspaper rolls in the paraffin, remove and let harden. the string ties act as places to light and these babies will burn wet and burn hot. A little bulky but lightweight and very efficient, you can even fry eggs in a small skillet with three of these. I think I learned how to make these from the old "Mark Trail" in the comic strips of yore. For those who live where white birch grows, white birch bark ignites easily even when wet and will also get a good fire going. Best to use bark from a dead limb. Ain't gonna find me cold or needing a signal fire in the woods of the northeast. If there are pines around the larger ones usually exude sap which hardens, it too will ignite wet and burn hot and start your fire. We usually carried a a piece of hardened sap too unless we were headed into a known piney area. As long as you can light a match nature provides in the woods if you know what to look for.

    Carry a can of WD?? who the heck has room in their pack for that?!? 2 oz plastic bottle of boy scout water is smaller, lighter, and easier to use. Don't need no stinkin' paper towels, (besides you should have "field paper" with you anyways) boy scout water will start wood easily. Cheap butane lighters are useless and unreliable, Zippo is the only reliable lighter, and waterproofed (paraffin coated) strike anywhere matches have kept many generations of woodsmen warm and alive.

    Regarding compasses they are useless in the woods unless you mark your bearings going in they will not help you find your way back. Same on the water. Most folks don't know how to go around a swamp, ravine, or lake following a compass and end up at the right spot on the other side to continue your route anyways, it takes training to do so. One of my BSA orienteering students came up to me twenty years later, I hadn't seen him since high school and thanked me for saving his life in Nam. I said what the hell?? Enlisted men aren't issued compasses only officers, but he carried his Silva BSA compass. He took bearings when carried in a Huey wherever they went. One day he got caught in an ambush with his platoon and only he and two other grunts survived, one wounded. LT with the compass dead. He had taken his bearings going out and was able to find his way back to the fire base leading his two buddies to safety. Took them two and a half days. True story, but you have to have training to do this, you can't just carry a compass and think it will save you.
    Last edited by gunsil; Jul 25, 2020 at 08:53 PM.
    Phil, delnorter, BillA and 1 others like this.
    Ya won't find nuthin' if ya don't hunt

  14. #29

    Dec 2012
    34
    59 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Quote Originally Posted by gunsil View Post
    Ain't gonna find me cold or needing a signal fire in the woods of the northeast.

    Gunsil, you bring up a good point I should have mentioned in my posts. The tips I have written are for the backcountry of the WESTERN HALF of the lower 48.

    You guys in the East get storms that last for weeks, and the temps can stay below zero for days at a time. I do not have experience in that environment, but I assume it would be foolish to leave your vehicle or snowmobile in the middle of a blizzard when the temperature is 20 below. On the plus side, what you guys call "mountains", we call "hills", and what you call "snow" we call "ice". Thus, when the weather does clear you can cover a lot of ground in a day walking to safety.

    Here, our storms typically come in waves that last 3-5 days, and temps are not nearly as extreme as the East coast. On the other hand, it is not unusual to get ten of feet of snow in 24 hours, the terrain is straight up, straight down, straight up, straight down, and because you sink up to your waist with every step, walking in the snow is very tiresome, and it can take an entire day to travel 3-5 miles. In this environment, 2 ounces of fire starter simply isn't enough because as mentioned, it will be necessary to start several fires since it could take several days to get to safety.

    Your ideas are great and you got me to thinking about putting a zippo in my pack. I've never had a problem with bic lighters but there is always that worry about them getting wet and not working too. If a Zippo can give me peace of mind, that is worth it's weight in gold!

  15. #30
    us
    Dec 2012
    lower hudson valley, N.Y.
    safari, ATPro, infinium, old Garrett BFO, Excal, Nox 800
    3,196
    4143 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Phil, no offense, but some of your statements are preposterous. Just making them without qualifying you mean NW is irresponsible, and even then survival is not much different coast to coast for cold weather. We live in a modern age and only a damn fool would venture out with blizzard forecasts and unless you are climbing McKinley or something the forecasts are pretty accurate. Sure, you have higher mountains up in the Sierra and Rockies, but I have hiked around western OR and WA and the hills and mountains there are no higher or more rugged than those in the NE. Upstate NY has the highest total annual snowfall of any place in the US period. Every year. You must think it is flat here if you think it is easy to cover a lot of ground in a day, like I said there are plenty of mountains here as rugged as western CA, OR, or WA. Have you actually ever been in the NE deep woods and mountains? How much kero do you think you need to start a fire, a few small squirts will suffice, a 2oz bottle will easily make more than four fires if you know what you are doing. Besides you also have a lot of pine out there which has sap, needles, and twigs that ignite easily. Bics are junk, you talk about making a fire in a heavy wind, they won't work in such conditions, you obviously haven't been exposed to the conditions you speak of to have tried it. Waterproof matches are more reliable than a Bic. Bics will crack and break open if dropped especially in very cold. The WD and Bic idea makes me pretty sure you are an armchair survivalist who has ideas about what to do but has never actually had to use them. Where do you get the idea of needing three fires in a triangle? Search and rescue folks look for smoke, one smoky fire is all one needs to alert aircraft. Do you even know the sixteen points of the compass? One other thing, aerosol doesn't work well below zero (WD) and neither do butane lighters. No pressure.

    This is not aimed at you Phil, but a friend has this sign on his house which I think is pretty funny. "SUPPORT SEARCH AND RESCUE-------GET LOST!!"
    Last edited by gunsil; Jul 26, 2020 at 08:35 AM.
    AARC likes this.
    Ya won't find nuthin' if ya don't hunt

 

 
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