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  1. #31

    Jan 2014
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clay Diggins View Post
    Just to the South of the map area was the mill for the Vulture mine. The mill was built by James Seymour who had purchased the "worked out" Vulture mine in 1878. The mill had 40 stamps and the ore was hauled by muletrain about 12 miles over rough terrain to this spot on the Hassayampa river. By any standards a 40 stamp mill was a big operation that required a lot of labor and water. The mill created a town of it's own.

    The millsite town was called Seymore. Seymore had about 230 residents, a store, two saloons, a hotel, a restaurant, butcher, barber and feed yard. It was a major stop on the stagecoach line. The water source for the town and mill was the Hassayampa sink a few miles upriver which today is a nature preserve. You can see the "sink" just north of the initial map view. The Hassaympa sink is still a beautiful lush green area on a normally dry desert river.

    During those years the town of Vulture, along with Jerome, Bisbee and Prescott were the centers of commerce in the Arizona Territory. Seymore was destined to become a major town in Arizona but for one thing. In 1890 it was wiped off the face of the earth in one of the greatest disasters in Southwest history.

    The Hassayampa river, along it's course from the high Bradshaw mountains, passes through some of the richest gold fields in the southwest. On the upper end more than 90 miles upstream from Seymore placer mining was big business in the mountains. In 1888 a large dam was constructed in Walnut Grove to provide water for the hydraulic and placer operations in that area of the Bradshaw mountains.

    Attachment 1277806

    Almost exactly 126 years ago on February 22, 1890 after a lot of rain the Walnut Grove dam broke and sent a 100 foot high wall of water rushing down the Hassayampa river. At least 120 people were killed along the river that night, mostly miners. By the time the flood reached Wickenburg 70 miles down river the wall of water was still 40 foot high. That night Seymore was obliterated along with many other small mining communities along the river.

    Today the Seymore town site has no roads leading to it. It's a very difficult place to find. All that is left is the concrete pad where the incoming gold ore from the Vulture mine was stored for processing at the mill. The night of the flood there were more than 20 tons of that gold ore stacked on the pad, all was washed away downstream.

    Seymore, Smiths Mill, Allah and many more mining towns, all near the map area, are no more but their history holds valuable information for the modern prospector researching potential rich areas. Although Seymore and the other places already mentioned in this thread provide good information the mapped area I offered has even greater treasures.

    It's still out there and I'm offering a pointy finger for those willing to do the research.

    Heavy Pans
    That was the flood which wiped out Jacob Waltz's (the Lost Dutchman) farm, right? And ultimately caused his death, I think. Those little rivers around Phoenix look like nothing, until the summer monsoons come and - as you said - a huge wall of water comes rushing down that can and will destroy anything in it's path. Suddenly you realize why there are all those silly looking 30' tall bridges over what appear to be dry washes.

    Given the massive size of the gold deposit at the Vulture mine, and the Hassayampa's location next to it, I would expect it to have good placer gold.

    About 10 years ago, I wandered around the Vulture for a day. Well worth the few dollars they charge for a self-guided tour. Bring a camera! But at that time (before gold prices peaked), the owner was trying to sell the mine. Mining there was still banned from the WWII era government halt, and so the price was ridiculously low for such a huge mine with so much left in it. Seems like he was asking $4M at the time. I'm hoping he got a much better price, since the guy (can't remember his name) was just an ultra cool dude. After everyone else left for the day, he gave me a ride around in his pickup and gave me an impromptu personal tour. I was taking photos, and he said if I ever wanted to come out and photograph it outside of the normal visiting hours just give him a call.

    Never did get to go back, though

  2. #32
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    Henry Wickenburg had an apple orchard/farm that was wiped out by this flood. Many others had homes wiped out and one lady claimed that she had $7000 in gold coins in her house that the river took. There is also supposedly a safe (contained gold nuggets, money, etc) from a saloon not far from below the damn that is somewhere buried under all of the muck.
    Does anyone know if the town of Seymore was named after the blacksmith Henry Seymore? This fellow worked as a blacksmith in Gillett, AZ and would rob stagecoaches coming into town. Before the stage could even make it back into town after being robbed, Seymore would be back in his shop working. lol

  3. #33
    Charter Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by flashover1969 View Post
    Henry Wickenburg had an apple orchard/farm that was wiped out by this flood. Many others had homes wiped out and one lady claimed that she had $7000 in gold coins in her house that the river took. There is also supposedly a safe (contained gold nuggets, money, etc) from a saloon not far from below the damn that is somewhere buried under all of the muck.
    Does anyone know if the town of Seymore was named after the blacksmith Henry Seymore? This fellow worked as a blacksmith in Gillett, AZ and would rob stagecoaches coming into town. Before the stage could even make it back into town after being robbed, Seymore would be back in his shop working. lol
    Yeah it wasn't Jacob Walz that lost his farm but Henry Wickenburg did as well as many other farms. The flood killed at least 62 people.

    There was a lost safe but who knows if it was ever found or if there was anything in it. If I had found the safe I wouldn't be bragging about it in public.

    The Vulture mine is not in the Hassayampa drainage so there is zero chance you will find gold from the Vulture in the river. The Vulture mine was purchased and is operating again. Occasionally there are tours on Saturdays but the gates are locked to the public and the site is being mined and is guarded. It's a great place to poke around.

    The Vulture mine was shut down briefly when the 1942 war order was posted but they appealed and won and the mine was reopened shortly afterwards and did operate during WWII.

    Seymore had nothing to do with the stagecoach robbing blacksmith from Gillette. The Blacksmith's name was spelled Seymour (not Seymor) and the builder of the 40 stamp mill at Seymore was well known and obviously wealthy. I'll write more about that Seymore another time.

    Heavy Pans
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  4. #34
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    SanDomingoJim

    Sep 2016
    Glendale, AZ
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    Clay Diggins

    Looking forward to any additional info that you have on "Old Woman Gulch" I been detecting and dry washing the San Domingo area for many years and that place still intrigues me with its history and nice gold that it yields. Tailing piles everywhere, and some old ones too. Jim

  5. #35
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    Welcome to the forum Jim!

    Old Woman wash is in a difficult to reach area, probably North of where you think it is and definitely North of the big highway. Other than that I won't be sharing any more hints but this - Bill knows where it is and he has worked it to his profit but he probably didn't know it was Old Woman when he was there.

    Heavy Pans
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  6. #36
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    SanDomingoJim

    Sep 2016
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    I appreciate the reply Clay. I may have been there myself without even knowing it. I used an old Honda trail bike and have been exploring all over that area. With that area being in Bill's backyard he has probably spent much time there. He definitely has a nose for gold.
    Did you ever know old Tom Mc... He and his wife lived in a little house just the other side of Ox Wash. I think he burnt his place down after his wife passed in about 1990. The years are getting fuzzy with me now.

  7. #37

    May 2013
    Surprise, AZ
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    Read an article today re arsenal mining for cobalt in the Congo. Didn't realize cobalt was used in lithium ion batteries. The cathode in these batteries is lithium cobalt oxide. The anode is graphite. Those minerals are in demand and valuable.

    A little excerpt regarding the mineralogy of the Congo Cu-Co (copper-cobalt) deposits:

    "The sediment-hosted stratiform Cu–Co mineralization of the Luiswishi and Kamoto deposits in the Katangan Copperbelt is hosted by the Neoproterozoic Mines Subgroup. Two main hypogene Cu–Co sulfide mineralization stages and associated gangue minerals (dolomite and quartz) are distinguished. The first is an early diagenetic, typical stratiform mineralization with fine-grained minerals, whereas the second is a multistage syn-orogenic stratiform to stratabound mineralization with coarse-grained minerals. For both stages, the main hypogene Cu–Co sulfide minerals are chalcopyrite, bornite, carrollite, and chalcocite. These minerals are in many places replaced by supergene sulfides (e.g., digenite and covellite), especially near the surface, and are completely oxidized in the weathered superficial zone and in surface outcrops, with malachite, heterogenite, chrysocolla, and azurite as the main oxidation products."

    The question is, can we relate this to our subject area? Most of the above minerals are most likely present in our target area.
    Last edited by hawkeye39; Oct 02, 2016 at 03:39 PM.

  8. #38
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    It's sometimes interesting and frustrating to know a lot about the behind the scenes maneuvering that goes on in the mining business.

    The area in question has been mostly under the claims of one man. This was an odd and somewhat amusing situation because the man attempted to build a mining empire on the back of a few lode claims, a whole bunch of placer claims, and a bunch of shiny new custom placer mining equipment. Odd combination for any area. Also interesting how this was done by selling shares in a mining business that didn't actually mine. Fully permitted, full of pretty equipment but no real plan, assessment of resources or any obvious intent to dig.

    I know some of you are thinking of Todd Hoffman when you read this! I'm thinking of several others like the Liberty Bell scam or one of the many other mining schemes that keep popping up in Arizona. Or even several in California. These paper mining "investments" usually only have old rusted equipment or even no equipment so the shiny stuff set up in this area of interest at least looked the part to the inexperienced investor.

    Paper "mining" schemes are nothing new and there are several going on at any given time. We see a lot of this side of the business. There is a "sucker born every minute" and often the one fleecing the sucker is a pretend miner. It's sad and eventually miners as a group are going to have to deal with these pretend miners or someone will do it for us. I'm thinking that last possibility would not be good for small miners.

    We've been watching this area for nearly a decade. We knew the area would be opening up and now the many IBLA appeals (3+ years) are over the mining claims have been closed and this area is open to prospecting again. If you've been following along you might want to do some exploring this season (we mine in the winter in Arizona). There is private property in this area and eventually there will be more new claims but for now would be a good time to take advantage of any research you've been doing here.

    Heavy Pans
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  9. #39
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    Hey aren't the guys from Sleepy Bear also the guys from....oh, nevermind
    Clay Diggins likes this.

  10. #40
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    Tell me about the minerals

    Same thing as all the paper claims for sale on eBay. Just bigger bling to catch bigger fools.
    Clay Diggins likes this.

  11. #41
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    Well this thread has been simmering a long time. I tried to give you a heads up about minerals other than gold being valuable to a claimant. Lithium has been discussed on this thread. Now it looks like someone decided to take a bite of the apple I've pointed out. This project is centered around pegmatites we've discussed for this location.

    There are more minerals than lithium involved in this mineralization. It's just that Lithium is the hot item on the mining markets today and anyone holding lithium bearing ground is finding it relatively easy to get development funds.

    Read about this new project and why Lithium is hot right now.
    Fortner Boyd Lithium—100% earn in option, 4,132 acres The company announced it expanded the project by over 600% last week; the project is located in Maricopa County, Arizona, approximately 10 km southwest of the city of Wickenburg. The area is easily accessible through the public road network and favorable to work year round. Geologically, it is a good location at the junction of the Mexican Highland and the Sonora Desert and is part of the Arizona Pegmatite Belt.

    The project has seen historic work since the 1950s that gives us a very good indication that there are lithium bearing dykes on the project that could be of size and grade to be economic. From the 1950s to 1980s, there was trenching, 75 shallow drill holes and a 10-meter shaft sunk. Watt, Griffis & McQuad from 1980: "The Vulture Pegmatite is a very large, nearly continuous group of pegmatite bodies which trend north-south for 1,350 feet. The bodies range in width from 10 feet to 50 feet. The Vulture Pegmatite is lithium-rich, containing spodumene, lepidolite, and possibly amblygonite." The historic resource outlined mineral potential of 330,000 to 552,000 tonnes at grades between 0.3 and 2.5% Li2O on just one of the dykes.Note, that these are historical numbers and not 43-101 compliant.

    In December 2016, Redzone retained SGS Canada Inc. (SGS) to complete a 43-101 Technical Report on the project. The historical work outlined above was only done on the Lucky Mica dyke. However, in the limited 2017 field exploration program 10 new pegmatite outcrops were identified and 35 samples assayed with better results ranging from 0.69 to 7.5% lithium oxide. This work identified seven more dykes.

    In the process of staking additional claims noted above, the company found two additional lithium prospects known as the Ambly and Dove claims. Historical reports from the Arizona Geological Survey indicate that several rail car loads of lithium ore were mined at the Dove Claims (report 1980) and records from the Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS) indicate that Ambly was explored historically for lithium (report 1978).

    Financial Cash position at Nov. 30 was C$540,000 and since then Redzone closed a C$1.2 million financing. This will give the company ample funds for a first round of exploration that includes mapping and sampling, trenching and a phase 1 drill program.

    Summary The project has seen very limited work, but based on historical data, we have very good evidence that the one explored dyke is mineralized and has good odds of being economic. With just a small exploration program the company was able to demonstrate much more potential on the property with several new dykes discovered.The limited amount of sample assays thus far indicates that seven of the dykes are mineralized.
    I have no financial interest in these new claims - but you could have had a financial interest if you had moved before Redzone did. A nice exploration lease on your claims would bring you more money just sitting on your derriere than all the gold drywashing you could do in a season.

    Heavy Pans

  12. #42
    Charter Member
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    Look at the Historical Gold Mining photo albums on my page

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    Quote Originally Posted by Clay Diggins View Post
    ...

    Very large crystals and gems are common in the pegmatites here. Just a few miles to the east of this spot some of the largest crystals in the world are just hanging around for clever rock nuts to see. One of the largest is over 300 foot long and mostly exposed on an easily seen hillside near White Picacho peak. There are Beryls, various Tourmalines and even more exotic gems associated with these pegmatite dikes and sills.
    Late to the party
    Your not talking about Crystal Hill, I think obviously... Are you? But we would love to see the place that your talking about. We're heading down to Phoenix today to get the free oil change in the truck and do some shopping and then... Some exploring! Maybe we can hit Pichaco Peak state park today.
    Last edited by Reed Lukens; Jan 24, 2018 at 11:15 AM.

  13. #43
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    Pichaco Peak is in another part of the State Reed. I'm talking about Picacho peak.

    You can see Red Picacho when you are driving north from Surprise on Hwy 60/Grand Av. It's the big dark mountain at your 1 o'clock. It's got a huge intrusive nipple on top. Look nearer and lower down and you will see it's little sister White Picacho. Same general shape as the big Red Picacho but much lighter and smaller.

    To get to the big crystal dikes Take a right at Castle Hot Springs Road in Morristown then cross Hwy 76. Continue up Castle Hot Springs road until it gets rough. Look towards your left and study the ridges there.

    Or you could just look at the road cuts on the east side of Hwy 60 after you cross over San Domingo Wash. There are several large crystals exposed in those cuts. They aren't particularly pretty but they do show good crystal structure on a very large scale.

    Heavy Pans

  14. #44
    Charter Member
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    Look at the Historical Gold Mining photo albums on my page

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    Picacho... it's my spelling that's the problem
    Thanks Clay!

  15. #45
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    WP

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    Ok, After watching video's and I have no clue what jibberish I've already posted. I'll go back and read the thread in case this has already been mentioned.

    I have a question about the area and looking at the map. Is it a possibility that the darker circles are Pipes? And would that be a spot to explore on the outer rims? Or a place of interest?

    Or are those darker circles of no interest and just different colored soil? There seems to be one with what looks like quartz around it, hard to tell.

    If you just grabbed a map and started looking would the different soils indicate what went on, just by looking.
    Last edited by Nitric; Sep 01, 2018 at 06:06 PM.

 

 
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