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  1. #16
    us
    May 2009
    Sailor Flat, Ca.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terry Soloman View Post
    Pretty complicated stuff!
    https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1965/upload...g-handbook.pdf
    Generating Monitoring Plot LocationsFirst, using the restricted random sampling methoddiscussed below, randomly locate ten monitoring plotsper monitoring type throughout all units proposed forprescribed burning in the next five years. These plotswill provide quantitative information for pilot sampling (see page 43), and will be used to determine theminimum sample size required to meet your monitoring objectives.To disperse your plots across the landscape, use a variant of stratified random sampling called restrictedrandom sampling. This randomization methodensures that your plots are dispersed throughout yourmonitoring type. First, choose the number, n, of sampling units that you will need to meet your monitoringobjective. As a guideline, use an n of 10 for areas thatare small or when the variability of your objective variable(s) is low. For objective variables that are moderately variable, use an n of 20, and for those that arehighly variable, use an n of 30. (These numbers may beadjusted once you have your initial 10 plots installed.)Then divide your monitoring type into n equal portions (see Figure 15). You will then choose at leastthree to five (depending on the likelihood of initial plotrejection, see below) plot location points (PLPs) perportion. Then establish a monitoring plot within eachof these portions (see page 62).Restricted Random SamplingIf you have currently-established plots within a monitoring type that were not chosen with restricted random sampling, follow the above directions, and whenyou divide your monitoring type into equal portions,do so in such a way that each portion only has one preestablished plot within it. You can then concentrateyour plot establishment efforts in those portions without pre-established plots.The likelihood of initial plot rejection depends on several factors: the odds of encountering one of yourrejection criteria (e.g., large rocky areas); how yourmonitoring type is distributed across the landscape(e.g., if the type has a patchy distribution, your PLPsmay not always land in the middle of a patch); the quality of your vegetation maps (i.e., if you have poor quality maps, your PLPs may not always land within thetype); and the quality of your Monitoring type description sheet (FMH-4) (e.g., you may have written a morenarrow biological or physical description than youintended, and as a result the type that you havedescribed only represents a small portion of the fuelvegetation complex that you are sampling). Most ofthis information requires input from field technicians,so initially you will need to make your best guess as tothe likelihood of plot rejection.Figure 15. Using restricted random sampling to generateplot locations.In this example, the monitoring type is first divided into 20 equalportions (notice that portion number 17 is shared between twoburn units, as the two parts of this portion combined is equal inacreage to each of the other portions). Second, within eachportion, random points A–D (PLPs) are placed using one of the

    I'm not really interested in their initial methodlogy..for why a brush plotter...plots..the plots.

    I'm interested in the paper trail and data left in its wake... if any.
    Terry Soloman likes this.

  2. #17
    us
    May 2009
    Sailor Flat, Ca.
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    Quote Originally Posted by delnorter View Post
    GW, the 19 is most likely the first two numerals of the date. Monument caps were pre-stamped with the usual agencey information. The first two numerals of the date (19) were also pre-stamped on the caps for the 1900s, the last two numerals of the year were stamped at the time the monument was set by the person/agency setting it. In this case, for whatever reason this was not done. Why?
    Ahh. that makes sense. lazy *******s

  3. #18
    us
    Mar 2012
    Idaho
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terry Soloman View Post
    I mean, I would laugh, but I think you're trying to insult me for trying to help someone. Oh, wait, my kid brother lives in Idaho, I understand now.
    No insult Terry, I'm visually impaired from a second stroke. By the time I read to the end of a sentence I loose my place to start the next line. What do you have against Idaho folks?
    Just because you CAN do something, doesn't mean you SHOULD.
    Visit my Idaho Gold Prospecting Blog at Bedrock or Bust
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  4. #19
    us
    May 2014
    AZ
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    Quote Originally Posted by delnorter View Post
    GW, the 19 is most likely the first two numerals of the date. Monument caps were pre-stamped with the usual agencey information. The first two numerals of the date (19) were also pre-stamped on the caps for the 1900s, the last two numerals of the year were stamped at the time the monument was set by the person/agency setting it. In this case, for whatever reason this was not done. Why?
    My guess is that they just "re-purposed" regular monument caps rather than designing and contracting for new special survey markers and that date and coordinates were not needed for brush plots.
    Terry Soloman likes this.
    If it can't be grown, it must be mined!

  5. #20
    us
    May 2009
    Sailor Flat, Ca.
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    Quote Originally Posted by arizau View Post
    My guess is that they just "re-purposed" regular monument caps rather than designing and contracting for new special survey markers and that date and coordinates were not needed for brush plots.
    No, if you look at it it is specifically not a regular monument cap

  6. #21
    us
    Mar 2016
    Tahoe, CA
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    I found this, maybe it can help looking up the field data...

    http://msuinvasiveplants.org/documen...monitoring.pdf

    4. Landmark references
    All monuments should be supplemented with references to visible permanent landmarks.
    Obvious landmarks on the site, such as a rock outcrop, can be used to identify the location of
    monuments. Directions from the landmark to the monument should include both measured
    distance and compass direction (note whether declination or magnetic). A photograph of the
    landmark from the monument that includes the monument in the foreground helps in
    relocation.
    On sites lacking nearby landmarks, triangulation can be used to identify the location of a
    monument in relation to distant landmarks. This involves measuring the compass direction
    toward landmarks such as mountain tops and permanent (you hope) man-made objects such
    as water towers or microwave towers. By measuring the direction to two objects, your location on the ground is fixed by the angle formed by those objects and your location. The site
    can then be relocated in the future. Triangulation is most accurate when the angle formed by
    the two triangulation points is approximately 90.

    5. Adding "insurance"
    No monuments that are required for continuation of the study (e.g., permanent quadrat
    corners or transect ends) should be without insurance in case the primary monuments are
    lost. One option is to bury physical markers such as large nails or stakes. A single buried nail
    next to a monument may be disturbed or dug up when the monument is disturbed. Better
    insurance is to use four buried nails, each exactly 1m from the primary monument on the
    four compass directions. A metal detector can then be used to locate the nails if the primary
    monument is removed.
    A second option is to survey the primary monument using survey or forestry grade survey
    instruments. You can survey the monument from a permanent known point or from two or
    more inconspicuous secondary monuments

    4. Field notebooks and data sheets
    While data from most monitoring studies will be collected on pre-printed data sheets (see
    Chapter 9), field notebooks will still be needed to keep a record of general observations and
    notes. It is strongly recommended that you keep a field notebook as a log of daily field
    activities. Field notebooks are also necessary for recording information on plant collections
    (see Section P)

    B. Recording Data in the Field
    Three options exist for gathering ecological monitoring data in the field: (1) tape recorders, (2)
    portable computers or data loggers, or (3) field data forms or field notebooks. The use of field
    data forms is covered in more detail than other methods since field data forms are still the most
    common way that field data are gathered.

    Each set of data should have a cover sheet that stays with the field data at all times
    The cover sheet should provide information on what, why, where, who, how, and when types
    of information. Detailed information should be provided on the location of study plots, the
    species or community being studied, the personnel involved, the types of management treatments that have occurred or are being planned, a description of any codes that are used, and
    a thorough description of the field methodology. See Figure 9.1 for a list of the types of
    information that should be included on the cover sheet, and Appendix 15 for a blank field
    monitoring cover sheet. In addition, each field data form should have a complete "header"
    section that links the form to the project described on the cover sheet. The header should be
    completely filled out on every page. The header should include at least the following items:
    1. Date.
    2. Location (general area and specific sampling location).
    3. Title/project description.
    4. Species or community name.
    5. Treatment category (if applicable).
    6. Observer (person(s) doing the sampling).
    7. Transect or macroplot number (if this information applies to entire data sheet).
    8. Page number _____ of _____ total pages.
    9. Room for additional comments.

    C. Entry and Storage of Data in the Office
    If the quantity of data gathered is small, sometimes the data can be efficiently summarized
    straight off the field data form using a hand calculator. Calculations should be repeated, to
    ensure that no mistakes were made in entering and summarizing the data. Often, however, monitoring data will need to be input into a computer system for data summary and analysis. If the
    data were gathered on a portable computer, then the data are ready to go. If, however, the data
    were gathered on field data forms or with a tape recorder, then data entry is the next step. This
    topic is divided into the following five sections: (1) selecting a computer software program, (2)
    storing data files–filenames and directories, (3) adequately documenting data files, (4) proofing
    entered data sets, and (5) making backups of entered data.

    3. Adequately
    documenting data
    files
    Each data file should
    include reference information about the data in
    that file (Stafford 1993).
    This information should
    detail the how, when,
    what, where, and who
    information included in
    the field data cover sheet
    and in header sections of
    the field data forms. This
    kind of information
    should be included in a
    file header that appears
    in the computer file
    above the rows of actual
    monitoring data. Any
    codes contained in the
    data set should be listed
    and described in the file
    header. A detailed
    description of the methods
    used to gather the data
    should be included in the
    file header or a reference
    to another source for this
    information should be
    provided. See Figure 9.3
    for an example of a
    completed data file
    header.

    Click image for larger version. 

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