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Thread: Sulphide Question

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  1. #31
    us
    May 2009
    Sailor Flat, Ca.
    Gold Bug Pro, Gold Bug 2 Burlap, fish oil,
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    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Banner Finds (1)
    Look close
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  2. #32
    us
    May 2009
    Sailor Flat, Ca.
    Gold Bug Pro, Gold Bug 2 Burlap, fish oil,
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    Where the pyrite is coming from, it's in some of the slate also
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  3. #33
    us
    Hardrock prospector

    May 2017
    Middle Oregon
    Whites, Fisher, Garrett, and Falcon.
    642
    196 times
    Prospecting
    Quote Originally Posted by Goldwasher View Post
    Where the pyrite is coming from, it's in some of the slate also
    If the white is quartz or calcite you mite be able to scan that area with a Falcon type of metal detector to get some more information about possible values.

  4. #34
    us
    Hardrock prospector

    May 2017
    Middle Oregon
    Whites, Fisher, Garrett, and Falcon.
    642
    196 times
    Prospecting
    Quote Originally Posted by Assembler View Post
    If the white is quartz or calcite you mite be able to scan that area with a Falcon type of metal detector to get some more information about possible values.
    If you get any positive hits crush and pan the whole rock to see if you may be in the right area mineral wise. Maybe a magnet will be useful after crushing. just have to try.
    Once you are in the right area you may be able to keep dry panning rock after rock just brushing off the top material. Just have to try it out to see what mite work best.
    A larger gold metal detector coil may be used after a number of rocks are dry panned out in the same pan.

  5. #35
    us
    May 2009
    Sailor Flat, Ca.
    Gold Bug Pro, Gold Bug 2 Burlap, fish oil,
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    43 acres of claim with gold found all over.
    I have a falcon...pretty slow and tedious..that's what gold bugs are for.

    Crushing every rock that makes a hint of noise with a detector is a sure fire way to end up with rusty rock dust and an empty poke.

    I'll stick with what gets me gold.
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  6. #36
    us
    Hardrock prospector

    May 2017
    Middle Oregon
    Whites, Fisher, Garrett, and Falcon.
    642
    196 times
    Prospecting
    Quote Originally Posted by Goldwasher View Post
    43 acres of claim with gold found all over.
    I have a falcon...pretty slow and tedious..that's what gold bugs are for.

    Crushing every rock that makes a hint of noise with a detector is a sure fire way to end up with rusty rock dust and an empty poke.

    I'll stick with what gets me gold.
    Excellent looks like some of the deposits are close together or large enough for one to use a gold detector. Sure beets a pile of rusty rock and a empty poke right. Thank you for posting the pictures.
    Yes some people think the gold detector is not useful yet look what you are finding with your gold bug.
    Yes the Falcon is slow and tedious to use.

  7. #37
    us
    dan zoller

    Jun 2015
    eldorado co.
    i got a swarm mx 100 , cheap but it makes noise !
    70
    88 times
    sluiceing ,suckin dirt,having a good time , shoveling till i hit bedrock!
    Quote Originally Posted by Goldwasher View Post
    Hey Dan. We dig where black sands and gold dust are born.

    Though your pals place actually has some tertiary gravel influence.
    Yeah i know its wild so much black sand ,and yeah the gravels within here and there gets confusing ,but good for procpecting ! So many different minerals around out yonder!

  8. #38

    Mar 2016
    175
    122 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Quote Originally Posted by Goldwasher View Post
    Patio method is a Spanish method of letting bio bugs do the job of conversion...kiddie pool+H2O+some fertilizer +your ore

    I get it about the specemins...though there are local reports of very rich sulfide ore. LIKE RICH I don't how much secondary enrichment came into play.

    I am in pocket and shear zone country. Yet, deeper mines are not as common as they are in the Mother Lode south of me.

    I will try to find links to reference but, I have read on paper reports of gold in sulfides per pound that you wouldn't believe with out reading yourself.
    The northeast (new england) has aresnopyrite that was being extracted to the tune of ~$17,500 in gold to the ton after losses... in mid to late 1800s. I believe it.

  9. #39
    Charter Member
    us
    Nov 2010
    The Great Southwest
    2,585
    7178 times
    Prospecting
    Quote Originally Posted by Golden_Crab View Post
    The northeast (new england) has aresnopyrite that was being extracted to the tune of ~$17,500 in gold to the ton after losses... in mid to late 1800s. I believe it.
    That would be 1094 ounces of gold per ton. That's a fantasy figure anywhere in the world. In New England? Pure BS.

    A lot of failed mining ventures were financed on claims of this level of recovery. When you see these sorts of numbers thrown around it's time to grab your wallet and RUN! I had to advise some potential "investors" (suckers) of this simple fact just this morning.

    IF there were such a rich arsenopyrite/gold deposit cyanidation would be required to extract the gold fraction. The cyanide recovery process wasn't even discovered until 1887 so a rich arsenopyrite mine producing more than 1,000 ozt in the mid 1800s would be an impossibility. Sometimes adding a few simple facts with common sense add up to an obvious case of mining "fact" as BS being foisted on the general public. In mining, as in so many other aspects of life the phrase "buyer beware" applies.

    Heavy Pans
    Last edited by Clay Diggins; Oct 12, 2017 at 11:11 PM.

  10. #40
    us
    Hardrock prospector

    May 2017
    Middle Oregon
    Whites, Fisher, Garrett, and Falcon.
    642
    196 times
    Prospecting
    Quote Originally Posted by Assembler View Post
    Excellent looks like some of the deposits are close together or large enough for one to use a gold detector. Sure beets a pile of rusty rock and a empty poke right. Thank you for posting the pictures.
    Yes some people think the gold detector is not useful yet look what you are finding with your gold bug.
    Yes the Falcon is slow and tedious to use.
    It appears that you have little trouble finding some values at times on the claim with a gold bug detector. Not everyone has grounds like this and may have to use a tedious Falcon metal detector to start finding any values. However some of the old timers could not use much in the way of metal detectors like we can today. Thanks again for the picture as this can give everyone some hope out here.

  11. #41
    us
    Hardrock prospector

    May 2017
    Middle Oregon
    Whites, Fisher, Garrett, and Falcon.
    642
    196 times
    Prospecting
    Quote Originally Posted by Assembler View Post
    Excellent looks like some of the deposits are close together or large enough for one to use a gold detector. Sure beets a pile of rusty rock and a empty poke right. Thank you for posting the pictures.
    Yes some people think the gold detector is not useful yet look what you are finding with your gold bug.
    Yes the Falcon is slow and tedious to use.
    It appears that you have little trouble finding some values at times on the claim with a gold bug detector. Not everyone has grounds like this and may have to use a tedious Falcon metal detector to start finding any values. However some of the old timers could not use much in the way of metal detectors like we can today. Thanks again for the picture as this can give everyone some hope out here.

  12. #42
    us
    Period Six Mining and Exploration LLC

    Mar 2015
    Sonoran Desert of AZ
    282
    286 times
    Prospecting
    Quote Originally Posted by Clay Diggins View Post
    That would be 1094 ounces of gold per ton. That's a fantasy figure anywhere in the world. In New England? Pure BS.

    A lot of failed mining ventures were financed on claims of this level of recovery. When you see these sorts of numbers thrown around it's time to grab your wallet and RUN! I had to advise some potential "investors" (suckers) of this simple fact just this morning.

    IF there were such a rich aresnopyrite/gold deposit cyanidation would be required to extract the gold fraction. The cyanide recovery process wasn't even discovered until 1887 so a rich aresnopyrite mine producing more than 1,000 ozt in the mid 1800s would be an impossibility. Sometimes adding a few simple facts with common sense add up to an obvious case of mining "fact" as BS being foisted on the general public. In mining, as in so many other aspects of life the phrase "buyer beware" applies.

    Heavy Pans
    The most I've even ever read about in a legitimate sourced book is 15200 gpt which works out to 488 opt. That came from a sample in France and certainly wasn't anything more than that.

    You could pull gold out of arsenic without cyanide but it would be a royal pain in the ass dealing with it prior to cyanide. You'd have to grind it down, roast the hell out of It, smelt it into a matte and then regrind before amalgamation. I wouldn't even want to wager how low the recovery rate would be.

    I wish I could remember which mine owner said "the gold in the mine is in Arizona, but the money is back East."
    Last edited by SaltwaterServr; Oct 12, 2017 at 11:08 PM.
    This ain't Michigan, its GOLD COUNTRY!

  13. #43
    Charter Member
    us
    Nov 2010
    The Great Southwest
    2,585
    7178 times
    Prospecting
    Quote Originally Posted by SaltwaterServr View Post
    The most I've even ever read about in a legitimate sourced book is 15200 gpt which works out to 488 opt. That came from a sample in France and certainly wasn't anything more than that.

    You could pull gold out of arsenic without cyanide but it would be a royal pain in the ass dealing with it prior to cyanide. You'd have to grind it down, roast the hell out of It, smelt it into a matte and then regrind before amalgamation. I wouldn't even want to wager how low the recovery rate would be.

    I wish I could remember which mine owner said "the gold in the mine is in Arizona, but the money is back East."
    Arsenic has a problem with roasting. The boiling point of Arsenic is 1137F but the melt point is 1503F. What this means is the Arsenic will vaporize before it reaches it's melt temperature. Heating Arsenic = Arsenic gas. The Arsenic component would have to be recovered, filtered and retorted to avoid killing the operators and everyone nearby. If you think cyanide is a problem try dealing with Arsenic vapor!

    Commercially Arsenic in the ore incurs such a high penalty fee that there is very little Arsenopyrite/Gold ore that could be commercially extracted. As a policy refiners reject even minimal amounts of Arsenic in the ore. In other words no pro will refine your arsenopyrite ore.

    This does illustrate a problem with complex ores and gold recovery by miners. A LOT of the minerals you encounter in mining are very dangerous if they aren't handled correctly. Simply adding a test leach or roasting ore samples has historically been the end for a lot of miners. That's why a good fire assay should always be the first step in any ore assessment. If you don't know what's in the ore you shouldn't be roasting or adding chemicals.

    Be safe, stay alive. Educate Yourself and Prosper!

    Heavy Pans
    Assembler likes this.

  14. #44
    us
    Hardrock prospector

    May 2017
    Middle Oregon
    Whites, Fisher, Garrett, and Falcon.
    642
    196 times
    Prospecting
    Most Assaying books will point out that in order to be labeled "Roasted dead" all the sulphur has to be burned out. This alone can be a large volume of gas compound just by itself. Not good to breath in at all. Add some arsenic and one can be dead fast.

 

 
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