Welcome guest, is this your first visit?
Member
Discoveries
 
Page 3 of 8 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 117
Like Tree240Likes

Thread: TEDDY ROOSEVELT WAS A MEMBER OF THE ORDER OF AMERICAN KNIGHTS

« Prev Thread | Next Thread »
  1. #31
    us
    Sep 2012
    Nebraska City, Nebraska
    3,076
    2897 times
    K.G.C. Cache
    Quote Originally Posted by Old Bookaroo View Post
    It was impossible to take any of the numerous companies which were proffered to us from the various States. The only organized bodies we were at liberty to accept were those from the four Territories. But owing to the fact that the number of men originally allotted to us, 780, was speedily raised to 1,000, we were given a chance to accept quite a number of eager volunteers who did not come from the Territories, but who possessed precisely the same temper that distinguished our Southwestern recruits, and whose presence materially benefited the regiment.
    14
    We drew recruits from Harvard, Yale, Princeton, and many another college; from clubs like the Somerset, of Boston, and Knickerbocker, of New York; and from among the men who belonged neither to club nor to college, but in whose veins the blood stirred with the same impulse which once sent the Vikings over sea. Four of the policemen who had served under me, while I was President of the New York Police Board, insisted on coming—two of them to die, the other two to return unhurt after honorable and dangerous service. It seemed to me that almost every friend I had in every State had some one acquaintance who was bound to go with the Rough Riders, and for whom I had to make a place. Thomas Nelson Page, General Fitzhugh Lee, Congressman Odell, of New York, Senator Morgan; for each of these, and for many others, I eventually consented to accept some one or two recruits, of course only after a most rigid examination into their physical capacity, and after they had shown that they knew how to ride and shoot. I may add that in no case was I disappointed in the men thus taken.
    15
    Harvard being my own college, I had such a swarm of applications from it that I could not take one in ten. What particularly pleased me, not only in the Harvard but the Yale and Princeton men, and, indeed, in these recruits from the older States generally, was that they did not ask for commissions. With hardly an exception they entered upon their duties as troopers in the spirit which they held to the end, merely endeavoring to show that no work could be too hard, too disagreeable, or too dangerous for them to perform, and neither asking nor receiving any reward in the way of promotion or consideration. The Harvard contingent was practically raised by Guy Murchie, of Maine. He saw all the fighting and did his duty with the utmost gallantry, and then left the service as he had entered it, a trooper, entirely satisfied to have done his duty—and no man did it better. So it was with Dudley Dean, perhaps the best quarterback who ever played on a Harvard Eleven; and so with Bob Wrenn, a quarterback whose feats rivalled those of Dean's, and who, in addition, was the champion tennis player of America, and had, on two different years, saved this championship from going to an Englishman. So it was with Yale men like Waller, the high jumper, and Garrison and Girard; and with Princeton men like Devereux and Channing, the foot-ball players; with Larned, the tennis player; with Craig Wadsworth, the steeple-chase rider; with Joe Stevens, the crack polo player; with Hamilton Fish, the ex-captain of the Columbia crew, and with scores of others whose names are quite as worthy of mention as any of those I have given. Indeed, they all sought entry into the ranks of the Rough Riders as eagerly as if it meant something widely different from hard work, rough fare, and the possibility of death; and the reason why they turned out to be such good soldiers lay largely in the fact that they were men who had thoroughly counted the cost before entering, and who went into the regiment because they believed that this offered their best chance for seeing hard and dangerous service. Mason Mitchell, of New York, who had been a chief of scouts in the Riel Rebellion, travelled all the way to San Antonio to enlist; and others came there from distances as great.
    16
    Some of them made appeals to me which I could not possibly resist. Woodbury Kane had been a close friend of mine at Harvard. During the eighteen years that had passed since my graduation I had seen very little of him, though, being always interested in sport, I occasionally met him on the hunting field, had seen him on the deck of the Defender when she vanquished the Valkyrie, and knew the part he had played on the Navajoe, when, in her most important race, that otherwise unlucky yacht vanquished her opponent, the Prince of Wales's Britannia. When the war was on, Kane felt it his duty to fight for his country. He did not seek any position of distinction. All he desired was the chance to do whatever work he was put to do well, and to get to the front; and he enlisted as a trooper. When I went down to the camp at San Antonio he was on kitchen duty, and was cooking and washing dishes for one of the New Mexican troops; and he was doing it so well that I had no further doubt as to how he would get on.

    ~ The Rough Riders, Theodore Roosevelt (1899)

    Good luck to all,

    The Old Bookaroo, CM
    Do you believe what Wiki has written for you to believe or do you want to know the truth of the matter? I don't, believe it because I have facts that say Teddy Roosevelt was a member of the O.A.K. and I trust my OWN research, not some boob that quotes his predecessors bull crap.
    ECS, Rebel - KGC and sdcfia like this.
    Contact me at l_cbaker@yahoo.com

  2. #32
    ECS
    ECS is offline
    us
    Mar 2012
    Ocala,Florida
    8,932
    9379 times
    Treasurehunting & Historical research

    BEALE's CONFEDERATE CAMELS AND THE KGC

    Most are aware of Jefferson Davis and E F Beale and the US Camel Corps, but at the start of the Civil War, the Confederates captured Camp Verde outside of San Antonio and the 80 camels and 2 Egyptian drivers that were stationed there.
    CSA Capt Sterling Price used a camel to carry his infantry units supplies, while CSA Texas spy, Bethel Coopwood used 14 camels in his covert activities in delivering ciphered messages to various castles in Texas. After the War, he bought 66 more camels at a Union auction.
    CSA Gen Joe Shelby, a KGC member, was not too fond of the Confederate camels and none rode with his IRON BRIGADE.
    Rebel - KGC and L.C. BAKER like this.

  3. #33
    um
    Dec 2008
    3,936
    2672 times
    L.C. BAKER:

    You make a great point! What would Teddy Roosevelt know about the Rough Riders? I mean, you can't rely on a lame historian like that!

    As for Wiki - you're wrong about that, too. The quote is from TR's book. The little numbers are page numbers, not Wiki footnotes. But don't get hung up on mundane details...

    What did Indiana Jones say? "'X' never marks the spot!"


    Good luck to all,

    The Old Bookaroo, CM
    Make America Think Again

    Do you have good books in good condition you are never going to re-read? Clean 'em out!
    Operation Paperback collects gently used books and sends them to American troops.

  4. #34
    us
    Sep 2012
    Nebraska City, Nebraska
    3,076
    2897 times
    K.G.C. Cache
    The point is "What would Teddy or his writers tell the general public that would put his tit in the wringer and stain his apron?"

    Name:  FOOL.jpg
Views: 204
Size:  30.4 KB
    Rebel - KGC likes this.
    Contact me at l_cbaker@yahoo.com

  5. #35
    us
    Sep 2012
    Nebraska City, Nebraska
    3,076
    2897 times
    K.G.C. Cache
    Quote Originally Posted by Old Bookaroo View Post
    L.C. BAKER:

    You make a great point! What would Teddy Roosevelt know about the Rough Riders? I mean, you can't rely on a lame historian like that!

    As for Wiki - you're wrong about that, too. The quote is from TR's book. The little numbers are page numbers, not Wiki footnotes. But don't get hung up on mundane details...

    What did Indiana Jones say? "'X' never marks the spot!"


    Good luck to all,

    The Old Bookaroo, CM
    Explain his use of the X at the top of this most important entry in his "PERSONAL" diary. Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Theodore-Roosevelts-diary-the-day-his-wife-and-mother-died-1884-small.jpg 
Views:	90 
Size:	32.9 KB 
ID:	1397711
    Rebel - KGC likes this.
    Contact me at l_cbaker@yahoo.com

  6. #36
    um
    Dec 2008
    3,936
    2672 times
    L.C. BAKER:

    If you want to bark commands and get a response buy a dog.


    Good luck to all,

    The Old Bookaroo, CM
    Make America Think Again

    Do you have good books in good condition you are never going to re-read? Clean 'em out!
    Operation Paperback collects gently used books and sends them to American troops.

  7. #37
    us
    Sep 2012
    Nebraska City, Nebraska
    3,076
    2897 times
    K.G.C. Cache
    Quote Originally Posted by Old Bookaroo View Post
    L.C. BAKER:

    If you want to bark commands and get a response buy a dog.


    Good luck to all,

    The Old Bookaroo, CM
    A FOOLS answer I have no more time for your nonsense
    Last edited by L.C. BAKER; Jan 05, 2017 at 09:58 AM.
    ECS and Rebel - KGC like this.
    Contact me at l_cbaker@yahoo.com

  8. #38
    us
    Sep 2012
    Nebraska City, Nebraska
    3,076
    2897 times
    K.G.C. Cache
    I will explain it for the people that are thirsty for knowledge with this picture.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	teddy X.jpg 
Views:	68 
Size:	37.9 KB 
ID:	1397712
    Last edited by L.C. BAKER; Jan 05, 2017 at 10:00 AM.
    Rebel - KGC and franklin like this.
    Contact me at l_cbaker@yahoo.com

  9. #39
    us
    Sep 2012
    Nebraska City, Nebraska
    3,076
    2897 times
    K.G.C. Cache
    Quote Originally Posted by Old Bookaroo View Post
    L.C. BAKER:

    If you want to bark commands and get a response buy a dog.


    Good luck to all,

    The Old Bookaroo, CM
    I have three I would like to introduce you to Buckaroo! No more time for an armchair quarterback, some of us are actually involved in the field.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	morton 1.jpg 
Views:	100 
Size:	109.0 KB 
ID:	1397718
    Rebel - KGC and franklin like this.
    Contact me at l_cbaker@yahoo.com

  10. #40
    us
    Sep 2012
    Nebraska City, Nebraska
    3,076
    2897 times
    K.G.C. Cache
    Quote Originally Posted by L.C. BAKER View Post
    Explain his use of the X at the top of this most important entry in his "PERSONAL" diary. Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Theodore-Roosevelts-diary-the-day-his-wife-and-mother-died-1884-small.jpg 
Views:	90 
Size:	32.9 KB 
ID:	1397711
    Skip the nonsense if you are thirsty. http://www.treasurenet.com/forums/kg...ml#post5237229

    L.C.
    Rebel - KGC and franklin like this.
    Contact me at l_cbaker@yahoo.com

  11. #41
    us
    Sep 2012
    Nebraska City, Nebraska
    3,076
    2897 times
    K.G.C. Cache
    How did the Order of American Knights roll over cash kick backs on top of their railroad monopoly money? Like whip topping on a Sunday!! ....and when they got caught and put on trial for it? United States President Teddy Roosevelt stepped in and got the secret order out of any further trouble and avoided exposure of the secret society or it's members ." Colorado Fuel and Coal Co. "

    Name:  Paul_Morton.jpg
Views: 167
Size:  11.1 KBName:  teddy1.jpg
Views: 167
Size:  5.0 KBName:  Jay_Gould_.jpg
Views: 163
Size:  11.8 KBClick image for larger version. 

Name:	jp_morgan1.jpg 
Views:	86 
Size:	39.3 KB 
ID:	1398616
    Last edited by L.C. BAKER; Jan 05, 2017 at 01:13 PM.
    Contact me at l_cbaker@yahoo.com

  12. #42

    Oct 2015
    S/W MO
    an old radio shack model
    212
    246 times
    Metal Detecting
    Quote Originally Posted by Rebel - KGC View Post
    Just read on Wiki about HEAD-STONES; Wood-Men of the World (Life Insurance) had Tree Stumps, Anchors, Ivy, etc. on their HEAD-STONES. WHERE have I seen THAT, before...?
    Rebel, remember the question I posed a few months back regarding a couple of people looking for pikes peak but failed to do so?, well buried really close to that guys family plot is a woodmen headstone ?? passed away in 1918

    this link has some interesting woodmen info http://www.usgwarchives.net/pa/1pa/t...en/woodmen.htm
    Last edited by Mark60; Jan 06, 2017 at 02:08 PM.
    It's not that life's too short it's that your dead for such a long time !!! "Find Your Beach"

  13. #43
    us
    Sep 2012
    Nebraska City, Nebraska
    3,076
    2897 times
    K.G.C. Cache
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark60 View Post
    Rebel, remember the question I posed a few months back regarding a couple of people looking for pikes peak but failed to do so?, well buried really close to that guys family plot is a woodmen headstone ?? passed away in 1918

    this link has some interesting woodmen info PAGenWeb Archives - Tombstone Carvers
    Think of it as a money making way to offer a consumer version of the real ones. Woodman of the world had a VERY suspicious beginning as WoodmenLife. Supposedly is a not-for-profit fraternal benefit society founded in 1890, based in Omaha, Nebraska, that operates as a large privately held insurance company for its members. They had broadcast interests that were to own the first television $tation where Johnny Carson would someday work. In 1883 Joseph Root founded Modern Woodmen of America, but after a falling out with other executives Root left the company and in June of 1893 Root founded Woodmen of the World. The purpose of these companies was to provide financial relief for families after the father, breadwinner, of the family died......taking care of the widows son, daughter and the widow. How much nobler of a cause could you find to filch the pockets of the bleeding heart main stream?

    L.C.

    P.S. 1893 Is a banner year for the O.A.K. and the money flowed in rivers during Cleveland's administration.
    Last edited by L.C. BAKER; Jan 06, 2017 at 06:01 PM.
    Mark60, Rebel - KGC and franklin like this.
    Contact me at l_cbaker@yahoo.com

  14. #44
    us
    Sep 2012
    Nebraska City, Nebraska
    3,076
    2897 times
    K.G.C. Cache
    "We have fallen heirs to the most glorious heritage a people ever received, and each one must do his part if we wish to show that the nation is worthy of its good fortune." - Theodore Roosevelt
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Martha Bullock Roosevelt.jpg 
Views:	78 
Size:	24.6 KB 
ID:	1399620

    Martha's family, members of Georgia’s slaveholding aristocracy, traced their lineage to several prominent Georgians, including Archibald Bulloch who represented Georgia in the Continental Congress. The Civil War placed some strain on the family, especially considering the Bulloch women’s southern sympathies. For one thing, Mittie’s three brothers (Irvine, James, and Daniel) had joined the Confederate cause BUT....supposedly ." Out of respect for his wife’s feelings regarding the sectional conflict", Theodore Roosevelt's father T.R. Sr. refused to enlist in the Union Army. Instead, he hired a substitute to take his place. He preferred to further the war effort by serving as an allotment commissioner for New York. The Allotment Commission was a quasi-governmental agency of the federal government of the United States during the Civil War. It was established by an act of Congress on December 24, 1861,[1] It was a voluntary program whereby 1/3 of a participating Union soldier's pay was sent home to family and friends. The purpose was to prevent wasteful spending among idle and bored soldiers in camp. Among the first commissioners was Theodore Roosevelt's father, Theodore Roosevelt, Sr. who handled collected allotted funds from a large portion of 2 million Union soldiers. I find that interesting. He was also supposedly in the Union League although "he is not listed".



    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martha_Bulloch_Roosevelt
    Rebel - KGC, ECS and franklin like this.
    Contact me at l_cbaker@yahoo.com

  15. #45
    us
    Sep 2012
    Nebraska City, Nebraska
    3,076
    2897 times
    K.G.C. Cache
    "When President Theodore Roosevelt wanted to deliver a message to the people, he knew how to first get the attention of the press. So it was in April of 1907 that he chose to plant a tree and use Arbor Day as a rallying cry for forest conservation. “A people without children would face a hopeless future; a country without trees is almost as hopeless,” he told his audience. He was appalled by the wasteful destruction of the nation’s forests and he clearly recognized their importance for sustainable use and multiple benefits. He said, “A true forest is not merely a storehouse full of wood, but, as it were, a factory of wood, and at the same time a reservoir of water.” Roosevelt found a way to add action to his words and eventually set aside 148 million acres of land in 37 new national forests. Julius Sterling Morton the founder of Arbor Day, J. Sterling Morton. In 1872, the same year he successfully proposed the first Arbor Day, Congress set aside Yellowstone as our first national park. Three years later the American Forestry Association was founded to fight the depletion of the nation’s natural resources. It was our first national nonprofit conservation organization and Morton became its president in 1892. He became President Grover Cleveland’s Secretary of Agriculture in 1893, the first cabinet member west of the Missouri, and was part of that administration when Cleveland added 7 million acres to the nation’s first forest preserves (later to become national forests). Click image for larger version. 

Name:	morton 1 (1).jpg 
Views:	84 
Size:	109.0 KB 
ID:	1400265

    L.C.
    Rebel - KGC and franklin like this.
    Contact me at l_cbaker@yahoo.com

 

 
Page 3 of 8 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast

Remove Ads

Home | Forum | Active Topics | What's New

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 10
    Last Post: Jan 14, 2017, 11:15 PM
  2. Replies: 72
    Last Post: Mar 31, 2016, 04:23 PM
  3. Replies: 31
    Last Post: Oct 19, 2014, 11:02 PM
  4. Replies: 41
    Last Post: Oct 05, 2014, 02:51 AM
  5. MUGWUMPS AND THE ORDER OF AMERICAN KNIGHTS
    By L.C. BAKER in forum KGC
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: May 05, 2014, 03:09 PM

Search tags for this page

teddy roosesvelt order of red men

Click on a term to search for related topics.
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.3.0