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Thread: Lieut. Col. William Emorys "Notes" and The Lost Adams Diggings

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  1. #16
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    Re: Lieut. Col. William Emory's "Notes" and The Lost Adams Diggings

    Oroblanco:

    Personally, the biggest problem with those "treasure" magazines was the lack of time spent fact-checking the articles. And the fact the editors didn't require the authors to provide reference sources (although, when they do, many writers are disappointing in the quality of the sources).

    We were in Fort Collins a few months ago. I was poking around on the Internets looking for background and there was a mention of a treasure writer who gave up because readers kept pestering him for more information about the yarns he'd just made up!

    I've been reading many of the old Desert Magazine articles, working on my Lost Mines of the Desert series. I like many of those articles because the writers actually visited the sites! That's another issue with many treasure magazine articles.

    As to Jacob Snively, I don't know enough about the topic to write a good article. I think someone would have to spend a few weeks in Arizona to do that one right. Jack Purcell knows more than anyone I'm aware of - it he was willing to put it together it would be a first-rate piece of work. Living here in Northern California there are a number of excellent archives and other sources. Also, when I was writing, the government agencies had the time and manpower to respond to inquiries.

    Of course, the Internet has made research much easier. In some respects, that's a good thing.

    Good luck to all,

    ~The Old Bookaroo
    Make America Think Again

    Do you have good books in good condition you are never going to re-read? Clean 'em out!
    Operation Paperback collects gently used books and sends them to American troops.

  2. #17
    pw
    Apr 2003
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    Re: Lieut. Col. William Emory's "Notes" and The Lost Adams Diggings

    Quote Originally Posted by Old Bookaroo
    ..... As to Jacob Snively, I don't know enough about the topic to write a good article. I think someone would have to spend a few weeks in Arizona to do that one right. Jack Purcell knows more than anyone I'm aware of - it he was willing to put it together it would be a first-rate piece of work.....
    Snively's name appears in many publications here and there, but only spuriously - even in Josiah Gregg's classic, Commerce of the Prairies. Below is the most comprehensive info on Snively I've been able to find in one place. It's an old TNet posting from 'Curly':


    Here is some interesting history...
    October 24, 1999 at 12:16:13
    In Reply to: Re: Back to the Lost Adams again
    posted by audigger53 on October 23, 1999 at 11:36:27

    (Im sending out some interesting research for you guys to read. I normally dont do this, but I felt it was some info alot of researchers on here have not considered or heard about. If its too much bologni, you dont have to believe it. But is real historical data on the life of Jacob Snively and his lost gold mine or the 1860's....and interesting as regards the current debates about the Adam's Diggings on Treasurenet.)

    _____ ,

    The information you describe is EXACTLY what my research tells me. I am thoroughly convinced that the German and Snively are in fact the same men (if there ever was a German, of course). I have the history. Snively apparentley was a seasoned pioneer and prospector, and knew what he was talking about when he arrived at Pinos Altos, New Mexico in the early 1860's with $10k in nuggets, and caused a big stir there. Judge Houston and Jason Baxter both describe his excitement about the mine at that time. His descriptions of the mine match exactly with the Adam's Tale in every feature, from the mountains he saw, the richness of the placer gold, the sluice he had, and other elements. Plus, the time-line fits with that of the story, as well. Its very likely Snively was indeed the GERMAN of the Adams Tale, and Im convinced of it at this point. In fact, he was in the Gila region as part-time prospector at about that time. Below is a broken summary of his history, and some stuff I have recently found. I am convinced this is a break through discovery in solving the Adam's Diggings. BUT, its what happened to Snively after 1865 that is really weird, and is quite fascinating, as is written down in history (here is what I have so far):

    SNIVELY, JACOB (ca. 1809-1871). Jacob (Old Jake) Snively, Republic of Texas military officer, was born in Greencastle, Pennsylvania and moved at an early age to Hamilton County, Ohio. After training as a surveyor and civil engineer he moved to Texas by April 1835 as a surveyor for the Republic of Mexico. He made his home in Nacogdoches and located and surveyed many land grants for the firm of William G. Logan and Henry Raguet. In July 1835 he was granted land in David G. Burnet's colony. He served in the Texas Revolution as first lieutenant and acting commander of Capt. Henry Teal's Company A of Lt. Col. Henry W. Millard's First Infantry regiment. Snively was commissioned on March 26, 1836, and remained with Company A through the end of August, when he was promoted to captain and assigned to command of Company B of the First Infantry, then commanded by Amasa Turner. On January 24, 1837, Sam Houston appointed him an ambassador to the Shawnee Indians and instructed him to interview Chief Linney about the tribe's intentions during the ongoing struggle between the Republic of Texas and Mexico. On May 13, 1837, he was appointed paymaster general of the Army of the Republic of Texas with the rank of colonel, and during June and July of 1837 was acting secretary of war. Snively resigned from the army in September 1837, but in 1839 he once again served as paymaster general under Albert Sidney Johnstonqv and in 1843 was quartermaster of the army and assistant inspector general of the republic.

    In January of that year Snively petitioned the Texas Department of War and Marine for permission to intercept a party of Mexican traders who would reportedly be crossing Texas territory by way of the Santa Fe Trail and to appropriate their goods in retaliation for the Mexican raids on San Antonio in 1842 and for the alleged mistreatment of Texas prisoners captured at the battle of Mier (see MIER EXPEDITION) and on the Texan Santa Fe expedition. Snively was instructed not to violate the sovereignty of the United States and given authorization on February 16, 1843, to raise and command a partisan command for the purpose. During the campaign morale began to crack, and some of the men began to grumble against Snively, calling him "a coward" and "an incompetent." Snively resigned in disgust, and Charles A. Warfield was selected as his replacement, but when he proved incompetent Snively was reinstated in command on July 15 to lead the volunteers home. By August 3 he and his men were back in Nacogdoches.

    When gold was discovered in California in 1848, Snively, then living in Corpus Christi, turned his interests over to his brother David and crossed northern Mexico in 1849, to sail from Mazatlán to the gold fields of California. He searched for gold there until 1858, when he moved to Arizona Territory, where he discovered the "Placers of the Gila" on the Gila River some twenty-four miles east of Yuma. He was in this area again when Adam's showed up and was led to the riich Apache gold placer. Snively was also involved in the discovery of the Castle Dome silver mines in Yuma County and took a leading role in organizing the district in conjunction with Hermann V. Ehrenberg. After the first territorial election in Arizona, Governor John Noble Goodwin appointed Snively judge of Precinct Two of Council District Two. In the second half of the 1860s Snively prospected in New Mexico and Nevada, where he alternately found and lost small fortunes.


    In the 1860's he arrived in Pinos Altos with ten thousand in gold nuggets describing the richest mine he had ever seen. Locals like Judge Houston and Jason Baxter were present at the time. By the fall of 1865, Snively headed back east, and was in Georgetown, Texas recruiting a small band of men to find this mine. Present among the men were noteworthy's of past wars in the Republic of Texas, including Col. William Cornelius Dalrymple(fifty three year old ex-ranger, soldier, Indian fighter, and member of the Constitutional Convention of 1966, Brigadier General Walter P. Lane, veteran of the Battles of San Jacinto, Monterrey, and Buena Vista, and Moses Carson, older brother of the famous Indian fighetr, Kit Carson, among many other famous Indian fighters of the period (Malcom Hunter, John Cohen, W. A. Robinson, and A. Whitehurst---all famous Texans!). At that time, Snively was said to have located the mine, by his own admission, in the "Sierra Nevadas" in Texas east of the Rio Grande. (By the way, there is no Sierra Nevada Mts AT ALL in Texas!) He gave several clues, including a fort, a military route near the placer, remains of goat-herders, the woman-head rock and other elements matching the Adam's Tale. One version says that Snively got the info from a dying soldier, who told of the mines and the massacre by Apaches, and described the mine in the 1860's as "the richest mine on the continent". Something remarkable must have been found, or Snively would not have been able to convince such noteworthy men of his day. Snively's band of men numbered less than twenty in 1866 when they set out on the long journey for the mine. Such an expedition certainly was in the spirit of the Adam's group. They traveled over hostile Comanche country along the old military trail leading to El Paso, and were soon besieged by a Kiowa/Comanche band while leaving the Conco River (approximately 50 miles from San Angelo, Tx in central Texas). Snively's beloved horse Charley died in the fight, and several men were injured. The attempt at finding the mine was then abondoned, but Snively was determined to resume the following year. In the Spring of 1866, he recruited close to 100 men and explorers from around Texas, including men from the earlier expedition. Each man was guaranteed a percentage of the gold, and so set out to find the rich placer. After many adventures(details of which i have historical documentation on), they arrieved at a place in west Texas called Eagle Springs. Its an old Indian springs which runs along the old Overland Trail to El Paso. Snively located the nearby mountains as the place....but somethings were not right. The men scoured the area for days, and eventually mutiny set in. Within months, Snivelys band was disbanded. SOme went back to Texas, recording their adventures in history books. Others went west to Arizona and other mining adventures. But Snively was lost and never found his mine. (How close was Snively to the gold mine? Was he even close? And why was he so sure the mine was in Texas? Why was a man, surely associateed with the Adam's Diggings looking in Texas with 100 gold-hungry and famous explorers of the west, and not in the traditional historical areas associated with the Adam's Diggings of New Mexico? This is the point at which I am currently stuck in my research.....) Jacob Snively went on west into New Mexico and added many moe adventures to his interesting life. Snively was exploring a route from the site of present-day Phoenix, near which he was then living, when his group was attacked by an estimated 150 Apache Indians at the White Picacho, a noted landmark near Wickenburg, Arizona, on March 27, 1871. Snively was mortally wounded and abandoned by his companions. His body, badly decomposed and partially devoured by wild animals, was buried near the sandy arroyo where it fell. His remains were exhumed eight years later and reinterred near the mining settlement of Gillett, Arizona. Gillett has since become a ghost town, and Snively's grave is said to be unmarked. Snively Holes, a watering place east of Bill Williams Mountains, Arizona, is named for him. Snively had a twin brother who moved to Nacogdoches in 1841, causing the locals a good deal of confusion and merriment. (So, were there two men, and which one found the mine....hmmmmm....another paradox!)

    Any additional info from anotherc researcher would really help... Thanks, Curly


    ​Adios, amigos - it's been interesting.







  3. #18
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    Re: Lieut. Col. William Emory's "Notes" and The Lost Adams Diggings

    After reading Col. Brown's report, I wondered if there was a map prepared as part of it. I looked in the Atlas section of the Records, and to my surprise found the Map of the Military Department of New Mexico, Drawn...by Capt. Allen Anderson...1864.

    I was acquainted with this famous work from Jack Purcell's book. I had not realized it was from The War of the Rebellion.

    For the benefit of those who don't have ready access to this wonderful work of cartographic art, here is the portion showing the country related in Col. Brown's report.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Military Map 1864 1.jpg 
Views:	2757 
Size:	175.4 KB 
ID:	527190

    Good luck to all,

    ~The Old Bookaroo
    Make America Think Again

    Do you have good books in good condition you are never going to re-read? Clean 'em out!
    Operation Paperback collects gently used books and sends them to American troops.

  4. #19
    pw
    Apr 2003
    New Mexico
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    Re: Lieut. Col. William Emory's "Notes" and The Lost Adams Diggings

    Quote Originally Posted by Old Bookaroo
    After reading Col. Brown's report, I wondered if there was a map prepared as part of it. I looked in the Atlas section of the Records, and to my surprise found the Map of the Military Department of New Mexico, Drawn...by Capt. Allen Anderson...1864. ....
    It's a great resource. It's interesting that place names and locations change over the years.
    ​Adios, amigos - it's been interesting.







  5. #20
    mx
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    Re: Lieut. Col. William Emory's "Notes" and The Lost Adams Diggings

    TIS, Springfied, TISN"T IT? Love old maps. will have to get oro and his hounds of Baskervile on it.

    Don Jose de La Mancha
    "I exist to live, not live to exist"

  6. #21
    um
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    Re: Lieut. Col. William Emory's "Notes" and The Lost Adams Diggings

    el Tropical Tramp wrote
    hounds of Baskervile
    Hey now - just take a look at my avatar photo, does that look like a vicious man-eater to you?

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  7. #22

    Dec 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by Springfield View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Old Bookaroo
    .... “Nearly twenty years ago a man named Adams with seven others came from California into Arizona prospecting. They stopped at Camp Apache for rations and continued east. A few days march from Apache they found a great deal of gold in a small canyon. One of the men, a German, after working about ten days, became alarmed about the Indians and left, carrying about ten or twelve thousand dollars in gold as a result of his labor. This is shown by the books of the Post Trade at Fort Yuma who bought the gold from him....."
    A theory pioneered by Jack Purcell identifies Jacob Snively as a likely candidate for the role of 'the Dutchman' of the LAD legends. Snively allegedly rode into Pinos Altos in 1864 with $10,000 worth of placer gold, and later sold it in Yuma ... or so the story goes. However, I haven't seen any solid documentation explaining the source of this story. Snively also supposedly claimed the placer came from a place 125 miles 'north of Pinos Altos', but again, this statement would be hard to hang your hat on.

    I wish there was more written about Snively- his life was remarkable, what little we know about him.
    You might note that an excellent article concerning this subject was written by Paul Harden titled "The Lost Adams Diggings: Part One" in the El Defensor Chieftain newspaper, Socorro, NM, September 4, 2004. Part two was published October 9, 2004.
    You will note that the Apache Chief Nana allowed them to remain in what he called Sno-Ta-Hay ("Where it Lays") canyon and dig for gold and could not pass beyond the waterfall at the end of the canyon.
    There is a fair amount known about Jacob Snively. My interest has been mostly with the stage station he ran for the Butterfield Overland Mail Company at Gila City, Arizona. He was responsible for starting the first placer gold rush in Arizona in November 1858. This was in the mountains just south of the Butterfield stage station. His first interest was in prospecting but he made a buck on the side operating the station. Sometime in 1864 he wandered off to the Pinos Altos.I have written about this period of his life in my recently published book The Butterfield Trail and Overland Mail Company in Arizona, 1858-1861.

  8. #23
    pw
    Apr 2003
    New Mexico
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gork View Post
    You might note that an excellent article concerning this subject was written by Paul Harden titled "The Lost Adams Diggings: Part One" in the El Defensor Chieftain newspaper, Socorro, NM, September 4, 2004. Part two was published October 9, 2004.
    You will note that the Apache Chief Nana allowed them to remain in what he called Sno-Ta-Hay ("Where it Lays") canyon and dig for gold and could not pass beyond the waterfall at the end of the canyon.
    There is a fair amount known about Jacob Snively. My interest has been mostly with the stage station he ran for the Butterfield Overland Mail Company at Gila City, Arizona. He was responsible for starting the first placer gold rush in Arizona in November 1858. This was in the mountains just south of the Butterfield stage station. His first interest was in prospecting but he made a buck on the side operating the station. Sometime in 1864 he wandered off to the Pinos Altos.I have written about this period of his life in my recently published book The Butterfield Trail and Overland Mail Company in Arizona, 1858-1861.
    Unfortunately, the well-known 'Nana/Sno-ta-hay' rendition of the LAD legend, a particularly popular one in the Socorro area, is one of many tellings of the tale, many in conflict with each other. That problem (too much conflicting information) is, of course, a serious burden for the curious.
    Last edited by Springfield; Apr 01, 2012 at 10:31 AM.
    ​Adios, amigos - it's been interesting.







  9. #24

    Dec 2004
    136
    15 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Springfield View Post
    Unfortunately, the well-known 'Nana/Sno-ta-hay' rendition of the LAD legend, a particularly popular one in the Socorro area, is one of many tellings of the tale, many in conflict with each other. That problem (too much conflicting information) is, of course, a serious burden for the curious.
    I have only heard about the Lost Adam Diggings from interested friends. The article I mentioned that this was in was passed on to me by a researcher with the National park Service. I guess this stuff about old legends gets kicked around a lot and therefore gets distorted like many lost treasure stories. Have you seen the article? I am curious about your take on it since you seem to be an expert in that area.

  10. #25
    pw
    Apr 2003
    New Mexico
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    Yes, I've read the article. It recaps several talking points debated for many years concerning the LAD, and identifies a number of landmarks key to the legend. However, in our fractal world, landmarks such as described in the tales can be found in a number of locations all over the southwest, depending upon the accuracy of the landmarks' descriptions and the eye of the beholder. Not only that, but the landmarks vary considerably among the many versions of the legend. I've got a couple dozen LAD versions, many of them favoring the 'northern' LAD location, ie the west-of-Magdalena towards Alamo/Datil/Zuni vicinity. Many other versions, well-known and not-so-well-known, favor other parts of New Mexico or Arizona. Most of the popular versions are third-hand information at best, some possibly second-hand. None are first-hand. Confident arguments have been made for years that the LAD has been located, but so far, nobody has provided a location where gold has been found. "I've found the LAD, all the clues are there" is not good enough. We need to see the gold.
    ​Adios, amigos - it's been interesting.







  11. #26

    Dec 2004
    136
    15 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Springfield View Post
    Yes, I've read the article. It recaps several talking points debated for many years concerning the LAD, and identifies a number of landmarks key to the legend. However, in our fractal world, landmarks such as described in the tales can be found in a number of locations all over the southwest, depending upon the accuracy of the landmarks' descriptions and the eye of the beholder. Not only that, but the landmarks vary considerably among the many versions of the legend. I've got a couple dozen LAD versions, many of them favoring the 'northern' LAD location, ie the west-of-Magdalena towards Alamo/Datil/Zuni vicinity. Many other versions, well-known and not-so-well-known, favor other parts of New Mexico or Arizona. Most of the popular versions are third-hand information at best, some possibly second-hand. None are first-hand. Confident arguments have been made for years that the LAD has been located, but so far, nobody has provided a location where gold has been found. "I've found the LAD, all the clues are there" is not good enough. We need to see the gold.
    Your explanation is very good. Your expertise needs no other qualification as you have noted "None are first-hand." This is the primary element in most credible research.
    As stated before, my only knowledge is of Jacob Snively concerning his relationship with the Butterfield Overland Mail Company. This thread extends to the LAD and is interesting to me, but only as a secondary interest. Thank you for your clairfication.
    Last edited by Gork; Apr 02, 2012 at 12:27 PM.

  12. #27
    gpg
    gpg is offline
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    Jan 2012
    9
    Prospecting
    Quote Originally Posted by Old Bookaroo View Post
    After reading Col. Brown's report, I wondered if there was a map prepared as part of it. I looked in the Atlas section of the Records, and to my surprise found the Map of the Military Department of New Mexico, Drawn...by Capt. Allen Anderson...1864.

    I was acquainted with this famous work from Jack Purcell's book. I had not realized it was from The War of the Rebellion.

    For the benefit of those who don't have ready access to this wonderful work of cartographic art, here is the portion showing the country related in Col. Brown's report.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Military Map 1864 1.jpg 
Views:	2757 
Size:	175.4 KB 
ID:	527190

    Good luck to all,

    ~The Old Bookaroo

    Thanks for the map. Rivers meeting near Clifton are again switched around from Emory. This is more like now. Bonito is as is now, but says "or San Carlos", the San Carlos is farther west. "Negrito or Prieto" is now Eagle Creek(again, not the Black as now in N. AZ). Azul is as now, the Blue. "Rio Nutrioso" is the San Fran. now. Never seen it as the Nutrioso before.
    Last edited by gpg; Apr 04, 2012 at 03:40 PM.

  13. #28
    gpg
    gpg is offline
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    Jan 2012
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    Prospecting
    Quote Originally Posted by Springfield View Post
    It's a great resource. It's interesting that place names and locations change over the years.
    I suspect in this case and Emory's map it was more of a case of the explorers not being quite sure where they were. The names are mostly the same, and the geograpy is somewhat accurate and similarly drawn, but the names have just been switched around with other close names.

  14. #29
    pw
    Apr 2003
    New Mexico
    BS
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    Well, this isn't exactly LAD stuff, but I ran into an acquaintance recently who had a good story to tell. He's an independent geologist and drilling industry inventor for the most part, and a boots on the ground prospector and treasure hunter in his spare time, which is plentiful. His education was at one of the west's school of mines. He's sharp and over the years has developed a network of capable buddies in different fields.

    He showed me a vial of what looked at first like placer gold nuggets, but they were all flat platelets. He explained that he found two old adobe furnaces buried in a hillside up in the mountains. He had begun uncovering the smaller of the two and had scraped the black burnt sides of a few bricks into a bucket and panned out the gold. The furnaces were crude smelters. There was no other human sign anywhere nearby in all directions.

    His plan is to return, totally uncover both furnaces and recover all the gold that he can. Then he will attempt to find the mine which apparently produced the ore that had been smelted, plus the arrastra site and any evidence of encampments, if possible.

    Now the interesting point of the story - how he found the area where the smelters are buried. Somehow (he didn't say how, exactly) he obtained copies of Col Emory's original field notes, which were significently edited prior to the publication of the Report. Included in the notes was an observation of the apparent smelter site, with lat/lon coordinates and elevation. No mention was made of the mine site in the notes, just the furnaces. My acquaintance simply hiked to the listed coordinates and began searching, and by a stroke of luck finally discovered the hillside where bricks were showing at a spot that water had eroded the dirt covering them. My friend didn't mention whether Emory's notes indicated whether his people had buried the furnaces, or that they found them in a similar state that my friend did. None of this information is included in the published Report.

    I'll pass on new info if I hear any.
    Last edited by Springfield; Jun 19, 2014 at 10:57 PM.
    Oroblanco and UncleMatt like this.
    ​Adios, amigos - it's been interesting.







  15. #30
    us
    Jul 2012
    Albuqerque, NM / Durango, CO
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    Springfield, were you able to obtain copies of those field notes?

 

 
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