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  1. #1

    Jul 2012
    1
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Nino Cochise and the Lost Adams Diggings

    FOR WHAT IT'S WORTH DEPARTMENT.

    I have noticed references to Nino Cochise and his book concerning the Lost Adams Diggings keep popping up every so often. The following review was posted on Amazon.com in reference to Nino's book. Reseachers for the Lost Adams Diggings may fine this interesting. If it has already been posted and everyone knows this information, I apologize for posting it again.

    NINO WAS A WELL-VERIFIED IMPOSTOR, January 3, 2004
    This review is from: The First Hundred Years of Nino Cochise; The Untold Story of an Apache Indian
    Chief (Paperback)
    The fellow who invented himself as the son of Cochise was only successful in his
    pose since such organizations as the Arizona Historical Society, which knew he
    was a faker, didn't choose to embarrass him, or themselves if he sued them.
    He would not have sued, of course, since he knew a legion of people who
    tolerated his act, but deplored it, would present themselves as witnesses in such a
    situation.
    Ben Traywick, official historian of Tombstone, who worked for the Post Office for a
    number of years, will be happy to inform anyone of Nino's real name. Nino
    received his Social Security checks under that name and was probably about
    thirty years younger than he claimed to be. Ben's mailing address is PO Box 891,
    Tombstone, AZ 85638.
    We all liked Nino in Tombstone some thirty-five years ago when his pose was
    flying high, and applauded especially the fact that German and French tourists
    seemed unusually susceptible to his bunk. We remembered him as the fellow
    who'd once raised skunks in a store down next to Ringo's old bar - since burned
    down. Nino undoubtedly got his idea to become an Apache from having a small
    part in the old TV series, "High Chaparral."
    One day I was buying the old `con' a few at the Crystal Palace Bar and slyly said,
    "Nino, I don't think you're getting the publicity you deserve. I think I'll get the
    three major TV Networks together to interview you . . . " at which he brightened
    up right smart, until I added, "and we'll get some Apache full bloods down from
    White River and Ft. Apache and do the thing in Apache." He said, "For Bleep sake
    Glenn, don't do that! You'll blow my act!" I have his photo inscribed to me with
    the words: "To my friend Glenn - thanks for not blowing my act." Why should I?
    He wasn't hurting anyone very much. Caveat Emptor!
    I am surprised, however, that respected historians were taken in by him and
    didn't notice that he had Apaches violating the taboos of eating fish, and killing
    bears, and engaged in such unlikely practices as scalping.
    This book is pure baloney from end to end. One wishes that he and his fellow
    conspirators (who may have been innocent of any intent to deceive) had done a
    better job of research.
    Being a terrible practical joker in the best Mark Twain and John Phoenix tradition,
    after almost scaring Nino to death about an interview with full bloods, I offered to
    fireproof him by getting him lessons in speaking Apache. Little did he know that I
    and another practical joker, who was then an itinerant glass blower in Tombstone,
    and a full blood Sioux, were all set to teach him some Sioux, which he wouldn't
    know wasn't Apache. The lessons continued until the glass blower left town and I
    suppose when Nino died he was able to handle a smattering of Sioux and "true"
    Apache. I mention "true" since, for his other fireproofing, Nino always said,
    "Those young fellows have forgotten how to speak "true" Apache." Can't you see
    him confidently working on an interview such I had earlier proposed, and doing
    his part in Sioux to the amazement of everyone but me the glassblower, and any
    Sioux watching the program?
    Buy this book as a curiosity, if you wish. But be aware of what it really is. Bunk,
    in the best Barnum tradition. Nino, I hope that you're in the Great Buffalo Range
    Beyond having a hell of a fun time, cadging drinks - and pulling the legs of
    gauche French and German tourists. Vaya con Dios, amigo!
    Amazon.com: Customer Reviews: The First Hundred Years of Nino Cochi... http://www.amazon.com/Hundred-Cochis...Indian/product...
    1

    TCG

    PS This is my first posting and I also wanted to see how to do it.

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  3. #2
    Charter Member

    Dec 2005
    Arizona
    5,271
    501 times
    TCG,

    It's an interesting book, but you have "Nino" pegged accurately, IMO. Been saying the same thing for many years now.

    Nice post,

    Joe Ribaudo

  4. #3
    pw
    Apr 2003
    New Mexico
    BS
    2,484
    598 times
    The LAD folks gleaned on to the Brewer/Tenney references in Nino's book and ran with it. Of course, Nino's book was written in 1971, long after the Tenney material appeared in the El Paso Herald in 1928. Go figure.

    One thing interesting about the Nino book is that it brought some attention to the 'Bronco Apaches' who did not surrender to US troops in the 1880's and lived in Northern Mexico up to about 1940, more or less.
    "The gods were smiling when you were born. Now they're laughing."​ Chinese fortune cookie

  5. #4
    Charter Member

    Dec 2005
    Arizona
    5,271
    501 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Springfield View Post
    The LAD folks gleaned on to the Brewer/Tenney references in Nino's book and ran with it. Of course, Nino's book was written in 1971, long after the Tenney material appeared in the El Paso Herald in 1928. Go figure.

    One thing interesting about the Nino book is that it brought some attention to the 'Bronco Apaches' who did not surrender to US troops in the 1880's and lived in Northern Mexico up to about 1940, more or less.
    Springfield,

    Too much fiction in Nino's book. I prefer "The Apache Diaries: A Father-Son Journey" by Neil Goodwin who used the notes from his father's (Grenville Goodwin) research. It's a great read.

    Take care,

    Joe

 

 

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