Superstition Mountain History - Apache Junction Public Library
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Thread: Superstition Mountain History - Apache Junction Public Library

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    Superstition Mountain History - Apache Junction Public Library

    Superstition Mountain History
    The Superstition Mountain
    Courtesy of Tom Kollenborn and the Superstition Mountain Historical Society.
    Arizona's Superstition Mountain has long been the source of stories and tales about lost gold. Legends of the Dutchman's Lost Gold Mine, Jesuit treasure, Peralta gold and numerous other lost gold mine stories still attract men and women from far and near alike to this rugged mountain range east of Apache Junction.

    Tales of Indian history add to the mountain's lore. These stories are centuries old. The Pima's called Superstition Mountain Ka-Katak-Tami meaning "The Crooked Top Mountain." From the towering summit of Superstition Mountain one can see the vastness of this rugged mountain range to the east . The mountain serves as a dividing line between rural and urban Arizona. As the population of the Salt River Valley grows the lights of Phoenix continue to advance on the realm of the Dutchman's Lost Gold Mine and the Apache Thunder God.

    This giant monolith, Superstition Mountain, rises to the height of 3,000 feet above the surrounding desert floor and dominates the eastern fringe of the Salt River Valley. The Superstition Wilderness Area, of which Superstition Mountain is part, contains some 242 square miles or 159,780 acres of Arizona's rugged desert mountain terrain. Mountain peaks tower 6,000 feet above sea level and deep canyon dissect this vast wilderness region.

    The region includes a wide-range of fauna and flora that are native to the Sonoran Desert life zone. Plants range from the giant Saguaro cactus to the stately Ponderosa pine. Mule deer, javelinas, mountain lions, bobcats, coyotes, a variety of birds, reptiles and amphibians live in this fragile desert eco-system. The diversity of living things in this region astonishes the visitor.

    Old-timers will tell you everything that survives in this desert wilderness either sticks, stings, bites or eats meat. This is an age old description about survival in such a harsh environment. This is a land were life is totally dependent on the availability of water. The desert is a place where water will appear one day and vanish the next day. Temperatures on the desert floor can exceed 125 degrees F in the summer months and can drop well below freezing during the winter months. Snow is not uncommon to the high desert mountains during the winter months.

    This land of towering spires and deep canyons was formed by volcanic upheaval some 29 million years ago during the tertiary period of geologic time. Superstition Mountain was formed during a tectonic maelstrom which resulted in a massive caldera. The caldera was almost seven miles in diameter. After the lava cooled, magma pushed the center of the caldera upward forming a mass of igneous rock. The mass was slowly eroded for millions of years by running water and wind forming the mountain we see today. Superstition Mountain in the distant past was a thousand feet higher than it is today. Uplift, subsidence, resurgence and erosion have all played a role in shaping Superstition Mountain. Yes, this mountain was born of fire.

    What is the origin of the name Superstition Mountain? The best answer to this question centers around the early farmers of the Salt River Valley who grew and cut hay for the Army at Fort McDowell during the late 1860's. These farmers constantly heard stories from the Pima Indians how they feared this mountain. The farmers thought the Pimas were superstitious about the mountain hence the name Superstition Mountain.

    Some authors and writers would lead you to believe the Spanish named Superstition Mountain. Sims Ely, author of The Lost Dutchman Mine, stated in the opening chapter of his classic book on the Lost Dutchman Mine that the Spanish named Superstition Mountain Sierra de espuma meaning a "mountain of foam." The origin of this name appears to be a forest service map drawn by L.P. Landon in 1918. Landon named a small butte southwest of Superstition Mountain Monte de Espuma.

    It is true, the first European visitors to this area were Spanish. Fray Marcos de Niza was the first European to see Superstition Mountain in 1539. He observed the mountain from the Gila River during his visit to the region almost five hundred years ago. He did not explore the rugged mountain range or record it in his journal.

    Sierra Supersticiones appeared on military field sketch maps of the region as early as May of 1866. This was during the Rancheria Campaign lead by Brevet Lt. John D. Walker's 1st Arizona Volunteers and U.S. Army Infantry from Fort McDowell under the command of Lt. Col. Clarence E. Bennett.. The first United States War Department maps of the region made reference to the Superstition Mountains as the Salt River Mountains. The first time Superstition Mountain appeared on official military maps was in 1870.


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    Lost Dutchman's Mine

    THE LOST DUTCHMAN'S MINE --History and Bibliography Courtesy of Tom Kollenborn and the Superstition Mountain Historical Society
    Does the Dutchman's Lost Mine exist? To answer the question we must examine the history and various documents about the region closely.
    Superstition Mountain and the Dutchman's Lost Mine are synonymous with Arizona lost mine lore. We must first ask ourselves is the Dutchman's Lost Mine a myth or is there some truth to this lingering tale from the past? Probably the most difficult part of this question is the separation of fact from fiction. The two have been so entwined over the past one hundred and twenty years it is almost impossible to separate the truth from the legend . There are several well documented facts associated with the story as well as outrageous lies.
    It is told a prospector named Jacob Waltz had a rich gold mine deep in the rugged mountains east of Apache Junction. The story tells of a German prospector who made periodic trips into the Superstition Mountains and returned to Phoenix with small quantities of bonanza gold ore. This old prospector braved the dangers of the marauding Apaches prior to the 1886 surrender of Geronimo at Skeleton Canyon.
    Barry Storm, an early author on the subject of lost gold mines, believed Waltz had found a Peralta storehouse or cache. Storm suggested Waltz's gold was too rich to be from a mine. He further believed the gold had been hidden by the Apaches after they massacred a group of Mexican miners. Many of Storm's aficionados believed his popular scenario. Therefore, many early prospectors believed Waltz's mine and the Peralta cache were all one in the same.
    There is not one shred of evidence to suggest the Peraltas ever mined in the Superstition Mountains or that they were massacred by the Apaches. Alfred Strong Lewis, in his manuscript, Rain God's Gold, theorized the Peraltas or Spaniards worked the rich goldfields four miles northeast of present day Apache Junction and were massacred by the Apaches as they were preparing to leave the area and return to Sonora in 1847. Lewis' scenario safeguarded Storm's unproven theory. Alfred Strong Lewis was a mining engineer who was totally convinced the Goldfields were the source of Jacob Waltz's bonanza gold ore. This theory continues to linger today unproven, but a logical choice.
    To study the story of the Dutchman's Lost Mine we must first examine the facts and tales about Jacob Waltz, the alleged owner of the mine. Furthermore, we must establish his existence and actual role in the story. To do this requires extensive research in national, state, county and municipal records. Jacob Waltz, according to documents, was born near Oberschwandorf, Wuttenburg , Germany around 1810. No existing church records support this date, however many census records do. According to documents Jacob Waltz crossed the Atlantic Ocean in 1839. He departed the Port of Bremen on October 1, 1839 and arrived at the Port of New Orleans in Louisiana on November 17, 1839 . The ship Waltz made his crossing of the Atlantic on was the Ship Oblers and its captain was H. W. Exter. His manifest listed Jacob Waltz as being from Horb, Wuttenburg , Germany . Waltz probably traveled to the gold fields of North Carolina and Georgia after arriving in New Orleans . From the gold fields of Georgia Waltz returned to Natchez , Mississippi . The gold fields had taught Waltz he had to be a citizen of the United States to file or stake a claim on a gold vein. Realizing this Waltz filed his letter of intent to become a citizen of the United States on November 12, 1848 , in the Adams County Courthouse in Natchez , Mississippi . After this letter of intent it is possible Waltz traveled to Texas and from there to California .

    Jacob Waltz arrived in California about 1850. His name appears on several California census records. He prospected and worked as a miner in the mother lode country of California for eleven years. It was on July 19, 1861, in the Los Angeles County Courthouse, Jacob Waltz became a naturalized citizen of the United States of America. Waltz worked as a miner on the San Gabriel for a man named Ruben Blakney. It was probably here he met Elisha M. Reavis, later to become the "Hermit of Superstition Mountain."
    Waltz departed California in 1863, with the Peeples-Weaver Party or a similar group of prospectors headed for the Bradshaw Mountains of Arizona Territory. Waltz was one of the earliest pioneer prospectors in the Bradshaw Mountain area. Waltz's name appears on the Gross Claim which was filed in Prescott, Arizona Territory on September 21, 1863. His name also appears on a special territorial census taken in 1864. On this census Waltz is listed as a miner, 54 years of age, and a native of Germany. Waltz's name also appeared on a petition to territorial governor John N. Goodwin soliciting a militia to control the predatory raids of hostile Indians in the Bradshaw Mountains. Jacob Waltz's name also appeared on the Big Rebel and the General Grant claims in the Bradshaw Mountains. Waltz was very active in the Bradshaw Mountain area between 1863-67.
    Jacob Waltz moved to the Salt River Valley in 1868 and filed a homestead claim on 160 acres of land on the north bank of the Salt River. It is from here Waltz began his exploratory trips into the mountains surrounding the Salt River Valley. If Waltz had a rich gold mine or cache he had to have discovered it on one of these prospecting forays. Old timers claim Waltz prospected every winter between 1868-1886. Waltz died in Phoenix, Arizona Territory on October 25, 1891, in the home of Julia Thomas without revealing the source of the rich gold ore found beneath his death bed.
    Jacob Waltz did exist. There are many government documents that support the fact Waltz lived in Arizona Territory from 1863-1891. The question still remains. Did Jacob Waltz have a rich gold mine in the Superstition Mountains?
    Shortly after Waltz's death Julia Thomas, Rhinehart and Hermann Petrasch traveled to the Superstition Mountains to locate Waltz's rich gold mine. After several weeks in these rugged mountains Thomas and the Petrasches returned to Phoenix empty handed and broke. Disappointed and broke Thomas produced several maps with misinformation on them. She sold these maps hoping to compensate for her losses. The Petrasch brothers hunted for Waltz's mine for the rest of their lives. Julia Thomas was the first searcher for the Dutchman's Lost Mine. The origin of the Dutchman's Lost Mine may have started with Julia Thomas.
    Many Arizona pioneer historians believed Julia Thomas gave an interview to Pierpont C. Bicknell, a free lance writer and lost mine hunter, shortly after her return from the Superstition Mountains in September of 1892. Bicknell probably paid her a token fee for the story. Ironically Julia Thomas and the Petrasches walked over the rich gold deposits at Goldfield in September of 1892 without discovering them. The rich Black Queen was discovered in November of 1892, and the rich Mammoth Mine was discovered on April 13, 1893. The Mammoth Mine produced about three million dollars worth of gold bullion in four years.
    Peirpont C. Bicknell , more than any one person, may be responsible for the tale of the Dutchman's Lost Mine. P.C. Bicknell was the earliest writer to associate Weaver's Needle, the Peraltas and Jacob Waltz with the Dutchman's Lost Mine in his writing. Bicknell's first major article on the Dutchman's Lost Mine appeared in the San Francisco Chronicle on January 13, 1895, revealing several clues to the location of the Dutchman's Lost Mine. These clues closely paralleled those that Julia Thomas and the Petrasches often alluded to.
    Bicknell may have also been responsible for the variety of names Weaver's Needle has had. He called the needle Needle Rock, Sombrero Peak and El Sombrero in different articles he wrote about the Dutchman's Lost Mine. Actually Weaver's Needle is a prominent pinnacle that towers over much of the region east of Superstition Mountain and had played a major role in the legend of the Dutchman's Lost Mine. This famous landmark was named after Powell (Paulino) Weaver, a mountain man, guide, prospector and early Arizona pioneer. Weaver first visited the area in 1825 when the region was still part of Mexico. Weaver's Needle appeared on military maps as early as 1853, making it one of the oldest anglo-American named landmarks in the Southwest. Weaver's Needle appeared on maps almost two decades before Superstition Mountain did.
    There is little doubt among historians that Peirpont Constable Bicknell took a writer's liberty to exaggerate the truth in much of his written material about lost mines. Any separation of fact from fiction must start with Bicknell's published works.
    It is doubtful that Barry Storm or Oren Arnold thoroughly researched Bicknell's early work on the Dutchman's Lost Mine. Since 1895, thousands of periodicals have appeared on the Dutchman's Lost Mine and much of the legend can be traced back to Bicknell. Bicknell may have had the earliest impact on the legend itself, but Barry Storm embellished all works he found on the Dutchman, Peraltas or Jesuits. His work impacted the thinking of more contemporary prospectors than any other individual except for the man who perpetrated the infamous Peralta Stone Maps.
    The one book that probably had the greatest impact on contemporary prospectors and treasure hunters in the Superstition Wilderness Area was Barry Storm's Thunder God's Gold , published in 1945, by the Southwest Publishing Company. Storm suggested in his book, Waltz's mine was one of the eighteen Lost Peralta Mines. Storm struggled desperately to link the Dutchman's Lost Mine to Spanish lost gold in the Southwest.
    Barry Storm's first book, On The Trail of Dutchman, was published by Barry Goldwater and most of the photography was done by him. Storm used Goldwater's money and also used his first name.
    Barry Storm, better known as John T. Clymenson, was one of the most celebrated writers and promoters of the Lost Dutchman Mine and the Peralta Mines in the early 1940's up to the early 1960's. His stories and tales fired the imagination of an entire generation of lost mine hunters.
    The two hundred and forty-two square miles of rugged terrain found in the Superstition Wilderness makes it a difficult task to systematically search or prospect the region. Most professional geologists will insist there is little geological evidence to suggest a rich gold deposit exist in these volcanic mountains. Jacob Waltz, the alleged owner of the Dutchman's Lost Mine, claimed his mine was located where no other miner or prospector would search for gold. A recent U.S. Geological Survey could possibly support this clue Waltz left behind. The application of the mercury vapor test over the Superstition Wilderness Area found the region to be highly mineralized. The report is indicative of deep seated mineral deposits. Who knows for sure, maybe one of those highly enriched mineralized bodies reached the surface by way of an intrusion. This report could explain why a man would devote his entire life to searching for gold in this land of barren ash and basalt.
    Since 1891, more than one hundred and thirty-seven people have claimed to have found the Dutchman's Lost Mine. The first claim was made on December 7, 1895. The story of the Dutchman's Lost Mine was well rooted in pioneer history long before the first tourist visited Arizona.
    Fake maps, lies and imagination formulate the foundation of many tales told about the Superstition Mountain region. During the past three decades investors have lost millions of dollars to unscrupulous con men and promoters. The naive investor better not take the written word of authors or periodical chroniclers without knowing their credentials. Authors and periodical chroniclers often take a writer's liberty to tell a story. Oren Arnold once said it all, when he said, "Don't let the truth stand in the way of a good story."
    No landmark in the history of the Southwest has generated so many interesting tales of lost gold and resulted in more deaths than Superstition Mountain. According to some, Weaver's Needle towers high over the surrounding terrain east of Superstition Mountain and serves as monument to those who have searched and died for the gold of Superstition Mountain.
    Prospectors and treasure hunters continue their search of this vast mountain wilderness for gold and lost treasure. Stringent rules for prospecting have limited their activity in recent years, but still they come to search for gold and lost treasure. The United States Department of Agriculture closed the Superstition Wilderness Area to mineral entry, at midnight, on December 31, 1983, to comply with the National Wilderness Act approved by Congress in 1964. This law stifled the search for the world famous Dutchman's Lost Mine or did it? Men and women still search for the Dutchman's Lost Mine.
    The clues to Waltz's gold mine still ring clear through the towering peaks and deep canyons of the Superstition Wilderness Area. "No miner will find my mine." "To find my mine you must pass a cow barn." "From my mine you can see the military trail, but from the military trail you can not see my mine." "The rays of the setting sun shine into the entrance of my mine." "There is a trick in the trail to my mine." "My mine is located in a north-trending canyon." "There is a rock face on the trail to my mine." These and many other clues have fired the imaginations of men and women for more than a century.
    Just maybe it is not so much the finding as it is the searching.
    BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE SUPERSTITION MOUNTAIN

    AND THE LOST DUTCHMAN MINE

    (revised Aug. 1995) Courtesy of Tom Kollenborn
    Allen, Robert J. The Story of Superstition Mountain and the Lost Dutchman Mine. Pocket Books, New York, New York, 1971. Arnold, Oren. Superstition Gold. Arizona Printers, Phoenix, Arizona 1934, 1946. Arnold, Oren. Ghost Gold. The Naylor Co., San Antonio, Texas, 1960. Arnold, Oren. Mystery of Superstition Mountain. Harvey House, Inc., Publishers, Irvington-on-Hudson, New York, 1972. Babcock, Jerry. Chicomoztoc. I.M.O. Green Printers, Inc., Marshall, Mo., 1990. Barnard, Barney W.E. The Story of Jacob Waltzer: Superstition Mountain and Its Famous Dutchman's Lost Mine. Mesa Tribune, Mesa, Arizona, 1954. * 21 editions 1979. Barnard, Barney W.E. and Higham, Charles F. Superstition Mountain and its Famous Dutchman's Lost Mine. New Edition, Mesa Tribune Mesa, Arizona, 1952. Bennett, H.A. Treasures, Mines, Indians, Death. N.P. 1970. Black, Harry G. The Lost Dutchman Mine. Brandon Press, Boston, Mass., 1975. Blair, Robert L. Tales of the Superstition Mountains. Arizona Historical Society, Tempe, Arizona, 1975. Brock, Robert M. Tortilla Flat History. Orion Publishing Company, Fountain Hills, Arizona, 1985. Brock, Robert M. The Apache Trail Guidebook and Lost Dutchman Legend. Orion Publishing Company, Fountain Hills, Arizona, 1986. Burbridge, Jonathan S. Arizona's Monument to Lost Mines. N.P. Reno, Nevada, 1969. Burns, Mike (Hooma-thy-a). The Legend of Superstition Mountain. Truman Helm Publishers, Phoenix, Arizona, 1925, 1927, 1935. Canaster, Estee. The Sterling Legend. Ram Publishers, Dallas, Texas, 1972. Carlson, Jack and Elizabeth Stewart. Hiker's Guide to the Superstition Wilderness. Clear Crekk Publishing, Tempe, Arizona 1995 Colten, James. The Apache Trail. Apache Printing, Apache Junction, Arizona, 1980. Colten, James. Echoes of a Legend. Apache Printing, Apache Junction, 1977. Corbin, Helen. The Curse of the Dutchman's Gold. Foxwest Publishing, Phoenix, Arizona 1990. Corbin, Helen. Senner's Gold. Foxwest Publishing, Phoenix, Arizona, 1993. Crossland, R.C. This Trail is Dangerous. Sun Graphics, Yuma, Arizona, 1984. Dahlmann, John. A Tiny Bit of God's Creation. Reliable Reproductions, Tempe, Arizona, 1979. 'Autremont, Hugh. West of Dawn. Exposition Press, New York New York, 1971. Davis, Gregory. 50th Anniversary of Don's Trek. Ironwood Lithographs, Scottsdale, Arizona 1984. Davis, Gregory and Kollenborn, Thomas J. History of the Lost Dutchman Monument. Salt River Project, Phoenix, Arizona 1988. DeGrazia, Ted. Ted DeGrazia and His Mountain: The Superstitions. University of Arizona Press, Tucson, Arizona, 1972. Ely, Sims. The Lost Dutchman Mine. McGraw-Hill Publishers, New York, New York, 1953. Francis, Marilyn. Thunder in the Superstitions. N.P. Phoenix, Arizona, 1957. Fraser, Jay. Lost Dutchman Mine Discoveries. Ben Franklin Press, Tempe, Arizona, 1988. Gardner, Earle Stanley. Hunting Lost Mines by Helicopter. William Morrow and Company, New York, New York, 1965. Garman, Robert L. Mystery Gold of the Superstitions. Lane Printing, Mesa, Arizona, 1975. Gentry, Curt. Killer Mountains. Ballatine Books, Inc., New York, New York, 1968. Granger, Byrd. The Motif Index. University of Arizona Press, Tucson, Arizona, 1977. Hage, David and Dennis. The Official Ghostbuster Guidebook. Double Take Productions, Mesa, Arizona, 1985. Harding, Albert. Dutchman's Gold. Almar House, Sun City, Arizona, 1981. Hayes, William D. Indian Tales of the Desert People. David McKay Co. Inc., New York, New York, 1957. Holder, Ralph. Mystic Memories of the Superstition Mountains. N.P. Apache Junction, Arizona, 1993. Higham, Charles F. Superstition Mountain and Its Famed Dutchman's Lost Mine. McMath's Printers, El Paso, Texas, 1946. Jennings, Gary. Treasures of the Superstitions. N.W. Norton Co., New York, New York, 1973. Kelly, Leo P. Thunder God's Gold. Evans and Co., New York, New York, 1988. Kennedy, Paul. The Apache Trail: Fact and Fantasy. N.P. Canyon Lake, Arizona, 1981. Kenworthy, Charles A. Spanish Monuments & Trailmarkers To Treasure in the United States. Quest Publishing, Encino, California, 1993. Kizziar, Kaye. Eyes of the Superstitions. AZ-TEX Books, Tempe, Arizona, 1993. Kizziar, Kaye. Beneath the Superstitions. AZ-TEX Books, Tempe, Arizona, 1995. Kollenborn, Thomas J. The Apache Trail. Orion Publishing Company, Fountain Hills, Arizona, 1982, 1984, 1986. Kollenborn, Thomas J. Legends of Superstition Mountain. World Printing, Apache Junction, Arizona 1995. Larson, Ernest. The Peralta Cache. Mavern Company, Stockton, California, 1975. Lee, Robert E. The Lost Dutchman Mine. Dick Martin Co., Inc., San Diego, California, 1975. Lively, Irvin. The Apache Trail. Helm Publishers, Phoenix, Arizona 1945. Lively, Irvin. Fingers of Fire. N.P. Phoenix, Arizona, 1948. Lively, Irvin. The Mystic Mountains. N.P. Phoenix, Arizona, 1955. Logan, Jake. Slocum and The Lost Dutchman Mine. Berkley Books, New York, New York, 1984. Lovelace, Leland. Lost Mines and Hidden Treasures. Ace Books, New York, New York, 1956. Marlowe, Travis. Superstition Treasures. Tyler Printing Company, Phoenix, Arizona, 1965. Morrow, Albert Erland. Famous Lost Gold Mines of Arizona's Superstition Mountains. N.P., Kansas City, Kansas, 1957. Munch, Theodore W. and Winthrop, Robert D. Thunder on Forbidden Mountain. The Westminister Press, Philadelphia, Pa., 1976. Nathan, Robert. The Mallot Diaries. Alfred A. Knopf, New York, New York, 1965. Nelson, Dick and Sharon. Hikers Guide to the Superstition Mountains. Telecote Press, Glenwood, N.M., 1979. Palmer, Ralph Fleetwood. Doctor on Horseback. Mesa Historical Society, Mesa, Arizona, 1979. Robinson, Richard A. Why Me? Conquest of the Lost Dutchman Mine. Aegean Park Press, Laguna Hills, California, 1977. Robinson, Richard A. The Superstition Tablets: Window to Lost Treasure. N.P. Laguna Hills, California, 1987. Robinson, Will. When The Red Gods Made Man. Hubbard Printing Co., Phoenix, Arizona, 1935. Rosecrans, Ludwig G. Spanish Gold and the Lost Dutchman Mine. Lofgreen Press, Mesa, Arizona, 1949. Schoose, Robert. Thunder God's Gold. Schoose Publishing, Mesa, Arizona, 1986. (Reprint of Barry Storm's book.) Shade, Don. Esperanza: The World Famous Lost Dutchman Mine. Paraclete Publishing, Ventura, CA. 1994. Sheffer, H. Henry III. The Missing Link. Norseman Publications, P.J. Printing, Apache Junction, AZ., 1994 (* Oct. 1993) Sheridan, Michael F. The Superstition Wilderness Guidebook. Lebeau Printing, Phoenix, Arizona, 1971. Sheridan, Michael F. and Jan. Recreational Guide to the Superstition Mountains and the Salt River Lakes. Impression Printers, Tempe, Arizona, 1984. Sikorsky, Robert. Fool's Gold. Golden West Publishers, Phoenix, Arizona, 1983. Sikorsky, Robert. Quest For The Dutchman's Gold the 100th year Mystery. Golden West Publishers, Phoenix, Arizona, 1983, 1991. Squire, Mark E. The Dutchman. Desert Candle Publishing, Apache Junction, Arizona 1994. Smith, Bobbie. Arizona Temptress. Kensington Publishing Co., New York, New York, 1986. Storm, Barry. On the Trail of the Lost Dutchman. Goldwaters, Phoenix, Arizona, 1939. Storm, Barry. Gold of the Superstitions. The Southwestern Press. Phoenix, Arizona, 1940. Storm, Barry. Arizona's Lost Gold. Mollet-Storm Publishers, Quincy, Ill., 1953. Storm, Barry. Thunder God's Gold. Southwest Publishing Company, Tortilla Flat, Arizona, 1945. Sunagel, Lois A. The Shadow of the Needle. Colonial Press, Clinton, Mass., 1976. Swanson, James and Kollenborn, Thomas J. Superstition Mountain: A Ride Through Time. Arrowhead Press, Phoenix, Arizona, 1981, 1982, 1984, 1988. Swanson, James and Kollenborn, Thomas J. Circlestone: A Superstition Mountain Mystery. Webcrafters, Mesa, Arizona, 1986. Swanson, James and Kollenborn, Thomas J. The History of Apache Junction. Goldfield Press, Apache Junction, Arizona, 1990. Wagoner, Merry. Treasure Tales Across the Counter. R & M Printing Chicago, Ill., 1965. Ward, Robert L. Ripples of Lost Echo's. Webcrafters, Mesa, Arizona, 1990 Wilburn, John D. The Riddle of the Lost Dutchman Mine. Lofgreen Printing, Mesa, Arizona, 1975. Wilburn, John D. Superstition Gold Mines and the Lost Dutchman. Lane Printing, Mesa, Arizona, 1978. Wilburn, John D. Dutchman's Lost Ledge of Gold. Publication Press, Mesa, Arizona, 1990. Author unknown. Apache Trail: A National Scenic Byway. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Tonto National Forest, 199

  4. #4
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    This website presents a descriptive annotated bibliography of books and pamphlets written about the legend of the Lost Dutchman Mine, Superstition Mountain, Jacob Waltz and other related topics. If you are looking for a discussion of these topics and not the literature start with one of the sties listed just below. Otherwise, to get started see the Introduction, or start with Core Works (this page). Also see: Related Works, Fiction and Poetry, Western Fiction, Juvenile Fiction, Art, Maps, and Publishing Chronology. Also of interest: Postcards, Artists (no longer being updated), and Images of Superstition Mountain.

    Popular Lost Dutchman Links:
    - Superstition Mountain Museum.
    - Tom Kollenborn's Kollenborn Chronicles.
    - Thomas Glover's The Lost Dutchman Mine of Jacob Waltz.
    - Lost Dutchman Gold Mine Forum.
    - Desert USA Forums.

    The most recent additions are (February 23, 2015):
    - Joe Berardi. Arizona Superstition Wilderness Topo Atlas Paperback.
    - Dee Tezelli. Crescent Moon over Flatiron.
    - Dane McCaslin. Legend.
    - Tom Treweek. Dutchman's Mine: The Adventures of Latakia Billows.
    - Connie Peck. Legend of the Superstition Gold.
    - Samuel Young. One hundred times up Superstitoin Moutnain.
    - Robert L. and Lynda R. Kesselring. Reading Peralta Maps.
    - Branton K. Holmberg. #2 The Superstition Mountains Treasure.
    - Carl W. Haywood. Lust for Dutchman's Gold.
    - Lawrence Pearce. Lost Dutchman Gold Mine.
    - Ronald Watkins. The Dutchman.
    - Pat Parish. Dutchman and the Devil.
    - Ross R. Olney. Lost Treasures of the Superstitions.
    - D. Arthur Eagen. An Adventure in the Superstitions.
    - Eleanor Mell. Hunting Old Snowbeard's Gold.
    - Tammy Merworth. Dreams of Lost Gold.
    - Roland Smith. Hijack Over Weaver's Needle.
    - N.W. Vance. The Ghost of the Lost Dutchman's Mine.
    - Dana Davis. Desert Magick: Superstitions.
    - L.W. Rogers. Superstition Trail.

    Articles of interest by Richard Robinson:
    NEW - Does the Superstition Tablets contain a form of a triptych? (12/14)
    NEW - Hypothesis Creation, Modification & Testing. A Case Study. (10/14)
    NEW - Esta Bereda Es Peligroza. (9/14)
    NEW - Here and There and How to Get There. (6/14)
    NEW - Addendum: Analysis of the Peralta Map. (2/14)
    - The Superstition Tablets. Window to Lost Treasures. (3/10) (This work presents the basic details of the Robinson/Reyes theory, which the rest of these works expand upon.)
    - At the Rim. (3/10)
    - Weekes Wash. (3/10)
    - Further Discussions of the Horse Stone. (3/10)
    - The Whitlock Mountain Enigma. (3/12)
    - Further Discussions of the Priest Stone. (3/10)
    - Could I Be Wrong?
    - Reminiscence.
    - Analysis of the Peralta Map.
    - The Gate.
    - Thoughts about the Ruth Search for the California Mine. (3/10) (plus accompanying photographs)
    - Expansion on the discussion of Ruth's California adventure. (3/12)

    Others articles of interest:
    - Superstition Mountain Publication Enigmas. (Greg Davis and I ask your help in finding the items on Greg's list of the most elusive Lost Dutchman publications.)
    - Bill Townsley on Barry Storm's Texas adventures.

    This is the text of Barry Storm's ad that ran in the Los Angeles Times classifieds under Business Opportunities for three days: December 30-31, 1937 and January 1, 1938.

    LOST GOLD MINE EXPEDITION, ARIZO-
    NA. OFFERS ADVENTURE, FAME,
    CHANCE AT FORTUNE UNDER LEAD-
    ERSHIP NOTED WRITER-ADVENTUR-
    ER BASED UPON RIGID 3-YEAR IN-
    VESTIGATION. RICH ORE, AUTHENTIC
    CLUES, SHARE BASIS. BARRY STORM,
    HOTEL EMBASSY. 851 S. GRAND.

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    Contemporary postcard map of the Lost Dutchman Mine.
    See Norton Allen's Superstition Mountain and Apache Trail maps.


    Maps! Many maps have appeared over the years claiming to locate the Lost Dutchman Mine. What I list here are some of the treasure maps to the Lost Dutchman published over the years, as well as maps of the Superstitions, the Apache Trail and the Superstition Wilderness area. Not a complete list by any means, just the ones I have seen or found records for in various databases. See the Introduction for an explanation of bibliographic and publishing information as well as notes and comments.


    Arizona quick guide: Apache Trail touring map. Phoenix: John Reinhardt, 1995. Two illustrated color maps on one laminated sheet 28 x 43 cm. flat, 28 x 11 cm. folded. Scales are 1:250,000 and 1:98,000. Title is from the panel. Includes location map of Apache Trail and descriptive index to places of interest.?/?

    Attebery, James D.
    A story of the Superstition Mountains. Lowry City, MO: J.D. Attebery, 1954; Kansas City, 1958.
    Two maps, each 56 x 44 cm. (55 x 42 cm.?). Scale is 1:50,000. Relief shown by contours. Title from verso. Text and illustrations on verso. Library of Congress record: "A considerable number of place names appear on the map. Line symbols with names indicate the 'Apache Trail,' and 'Trail of Spaniards and Indians.' Other trails are show by line symbol without name. The map pertains to an area renowned in lost mine and treasure lore. Available from Mr. Attebery (St. Clair County Historical Society, Lowry City, Mo. 64763), $1" $1/?

    Austin, Wilson.
    The Lost Dutchman gold mine of the Superstition Mountains. Phoenix: Wilson Austin Surveys and Maps, 1960.
    Map is 37 x 58 cm., scale is 1:47,000. (From another record: 55x85 cm., scale is 1:32,300. Photocopy, blue line print). Includes text and illustrations. Library of Congress record: "Contains several place names. Line symbols with names indicate the 'Apache Trail,' 'Charlebois Trail,' and 'Block (sic) Mesa Trail.' Other trails are shown by line symbol without name. At the bottom of the map are short texts pertaining to 'Superstition Mountain' and 'The Dutchman Jacob Waltz (Walzer) …' Townships north and south and ranges east of the meridian are indicated. Available from Wilson Austin Surveys and Maps (P.O. Box 728, Phoenix, Ariz. 85001). $1.50" $1.50/?

    Berardi, Joe.
    Arizona Superstition Wilderness Topo Atlas Paperback. CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2015.
    Softcover, 112 pages. "This book is a compilation of topographical maps that are required by any hiker attempting to hike the remote and rugged Superstition Wilderness. The custom detailed maps make hiking this wilderness much easier and the maps have key GPS coordinates for finding the trailheads and major trail junctions. This book of maps eliminates the anxiety of trial and error hiking for hiking some of the most pristine desert in the United States. This atlas eliminates the need to buy multiple 7.5x7.5 quad maps for a single hike and pays for itself by not having to buy multiple high resolution maps." $18.45.

    Beartooth Maps.
    Superstition Wilderness. Arizona Topographic Map. Big Sky, Mt: Beartooth Maps, 1997.
    Second edition in 2000. Fourth edition in 2010. Color, one map both sides, 71 x 119 cm. on sheet 94 x 61 cm., 20 x 11 cm. folded (30 panels). Scale is 1:39,000. Legend shows primary and secondary roads, dirt and improved dirt roads, Forest Service trails, unmaintained trails, National Forest road and trail numbers, mileage markers, wilderness boundary, tree and scrub brush cover, and non-Forest Service land. Shows contour intervals. On the cover: "Includes the entire Superstition Wilderness / Canyon and Apache Lakes Recreation areas / Part of the Four Peaks Wilderness. Trail elevation profiles / Local information / Waterproof, tearproof plastic." "This map covers the following USGS 7.5' quads: Mormon Flat Dam, Goldfield, Horse Mesa Dam, Weavers Needle, Pinyon Mountain, Iron Mountain, Two Bar Mountain, Haunted Canyon." First edition. ?/?
    Second edition. $9.95/$9.95.
    Fourth edition. $11.44/$11.44.

    Brock, Bob.
    The Superstition Mountains. Tortilla Flats: Bob Brock, 1984.
    Map is 55 x 43 cm. In the legend: "This Area Map for reference only - Consult one of several Government Maps available before embarking into this area." The map shows roads and highways, trails, streams, springs and washes, mountains, peaks and landmarks. $2.00/$2.00.

    Carlson, Jack and Elizabeth Stewart.
    Trails in the Superstition Mountain Foothills. Tempe: Clear Creek Publishing, 2006.
    One sheet, four panels, map is 41 x 26 cm., on sheet that is 43 x 28 cm. There are numerous revisions, the latest of which is 6.2 (complete list: 1.0, 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 4.0a, 4.0b, 4.0c, 4.1, 4.1b, 4.1c, 4.1d, 4.2, 5.0, 5.0a, 6.0, 6.1, 6.2). Map on one side, detailed information on two hiking trails on the reverse. "Trailheads for the Lost Goldmine and Jacob's Crosscut Trail Superstition Mountains, Arizona." Information on "Mileage Betweem Trailheads," "Trails in the Superstition Mountain Foothills Arizona" and "Trailhead Facilities." The map shows the major trailheads around the periphery of the Superstitions. From the authors of the excellent Superstition Wilderness Trails West, Superstition Wilderness Trails East and Hiker's Guide to the Superstition Wilderness. $1.50/$1.50.

    Carter, Jack.
    Map of the Superstition Mountain wilderness & Four Peaks area: vicinity of the famed Dutchman's lost Gold mine. Phoenix, 1962.
    Color, 48 x 37 cm. flat, 21 x 14 cm. folded. Scale is 1:167,000. Relief shown pictorially. Title from verso. "Compiled from the Dept. of Commerce Geodetic Survey Aeronautical charts, Tonto National Forest maps--Dept. of Interior Geological Survey--Information from rangers, ranchers, prospectors, persons familiar with the area." Library of Congress record: "Gives locations of mines, springs, fences, roads, and trails. Superstition Mountain and Weaver's Needle are shown." ?/?

    Counseller, Mel.
    Apache Trail and Superstition Mountain area. Apache Junction: Chamber of Commerce, 1967.
    Map is 22 x 29 cm. flat, 23 x 10 cm. folded. Scale not given. Folded title: "Welcome to ... Apache Junction." Relief shown pictorially. Includes "Things to do and see," directory, and on verso, text, colored illustrations and the "Story of the lost Dutchman." "Drawn by Mel Counseller. Copyrighted by Catherine P. Berridge."?/?

    Earth Tracks.
    Superstition Wilderness West recreation map. Phoenix: Earth Tracks, 1985, 1994, 1996.
    Color, one map on both sides that is 73 x 46 cm. on sheet that is 91 x 48 cm. Scale is 1:31,680, 2 inches = 1 miile. Relief shown by contours and spot heights. "Cartography by the U.S.G.S. Revision by Earth Tracks." Legend, backcountry etiquette, and information on camping facilities and hiking trailheads.1996. $6.95/$6.95.

    Earth Tracks.
    Superstition Wilderness East recreation map. Phoenix: Earth Tracks, 1985.
    Color, one map on both sides that is 73 x 46 cm. on sheet that is 91 x 48 cm. Scale is 1:31,680, 2 inches = 1 mile. Relief shown by contours and spot heights. "Cartography by the U.S.G.S. Revision by Earth Tracks."?/?

    Emby Originals.
    Map of the legendary Lost Dutchman, Superstition Mountains of Arizona. Phoenix: Emby Originals, 1973.
    Map is 44 x 57 cm. flat, 28 x 22 cm. folded (four panels). There is no legend, but the map shows highways, canyons, springs, mountains, trails, and historic locations and sights. "3819 East Indian School Road." Verso: tells the "Legend of the Lost Dutchman."?/$5.00.


    Fenninger, A.
    Old timer's map of the Superstition Mountains. Wickenburg: A. Fenninger, 1964.
    ?/?

    Higham, Charles Frederick.
    Lost Dutchman Map.
    On the cover: "Map of the Lost Dutchman gold mine area." Map is 77 x 57 cm. flat, 28 x 16 cm. folded (ten panels). It shows highways, canyons, springs, mountains, trails, mines, caves and historic spots. On verso, a very brief telling of the Dutchman tale: "The story condensed from the book entitled The True Story of Jacob Walzer and his Famous Hidden Gold Mine by Charles Frederick Higham." Although this looks like an enlarged version of the map found in both the joint Higham-Barnard work and Barnard's later editions, it is not. This version presents less detail, even though it is physically much larger, and is not as carefully annotated and illustrated as the map in Barnard's editions. On the map Higham presents a few clues: "My mine is in a canyon, running north and south. Across from my mine is my cave. The afternoon sun shines into my cave. From my cave I can see Weaver's Needle. My shaft goes down on a vein 18 inches thick. I watered my burros at the old water hole. I covered my mine from all miners. So said the Dutchman in 1889 - "? /$20.00.




    Mead, Norman W.
    Superstition Mountains, legendary location of the Lost Dutchman Mine. Mesa: Norman W. Mead, 1984, (1976?).
    Map is 76 x 58 cm. flat, scale is 2"=1 mile. Nice map. Shows trails, peaks, streams, highways, roads and trails, canyons, springs, prospects, campsites and contour lines. "Although great care has been taken in the preparation of this map it is still advisable to do as much research as possible and study all available maps before entering such a wilderness area." "610 McLellan Mesa, Arizona."?/?

    Miller, John.
    The Lost Dutchman's Mine. Bay St. Louis, Ms.: Miller Books, 1999.
    Map is 20 x 28 cm. On brown paper, reproducing a map from Dutchman lore. See Tom Kollenborn's Treasure Map Facsimile List website Map #36 to see what this looks like. On the map: "This is a reproduction of the map sold by Mrs. Julia Thomas, the lady that took care of Jacob Waltz before he died." The map comes with additional material; one page on the Lost Dutchman's Mine and three pages on how to antique the map. 12.00/?

    Morehead, Robert.
    Ram's area map of the Lost Dutchman mine. Dallas: Ram Pub. Co., 1972.
    Photocopy, 35 x 43 cm. flat, 11 x 18 cm. folded (eight panels). Scale is 1:80,000, .75"= 1 mi. Legend shows dirt roads, paved roads, and desert. "As described in Estee Conatser's book, The Sterling Legend." The Sterling Legend does include a map in a back pocket, this is, I assume, the same map.?/?

    Nelson, Dick (Richard C.), 1940- and Sharon Nelson.
    Trail map of the Superstition Wilderness of Arizona: (western half). Glenwood: Tecolote Press, 1980.
    Color, 45 x 61 cm. flat, 31 x 24 cm. folded. Scale is 1:31,000. Relief shown by contours and spot heights. Series: Arizona trail map; no. 1. Panel title: The Superstition Wilderness, western half. Text on verso. See the Nelson's Hiker's guide to the Superstition Mountains.?/?

    Stirrat, John Alan.
    Map of the Lost Dutchman and other legendary mine areas in the Superstition Mountains of Arizona. Anaheim, 1948.
    Map is 41 x 53 cm. flat, 22 x 12 cm. folded. Scale is 1:30,000.
    Map of the Lost Dutchman and other legendary mine areas in the Superstition Mountains of Arizona. El Paso, 1959, c1948. "Reprinted March 1959." Map is 41 x 53 cm. flat, 22 x 12 cm. folded. Relief shown by hachures and spot heights. Text on verso. Library of Congress record: "Legend contains symbols for roads, springs, washes, trails, sand patches, cliffs, mines, and prospects. This map is designed for the use of the Lost Mine Hunter and Adventurer. Showing the main trails, permanent springs, prominent mountains and old Spanish miners' signs." On the 1948 edition "Anaheim, California" is crossed out on the front and under it is written, "Tortilla Flat, Arizona." Otherwise the back and front are the same, with this on the back: "This map is designed for the use of the Lost Mine Hunter and Adventurer. Showing the main trails, permanent springs, prominent mountains and Old Spanish miners' signs." Interestingly, the 1959 edition has a number of new locations noted on the map, for example,"Ruth's Remains" and "Herman's Camp" and the very small photograph of Petroglyph Rock on the 1948 is replaced by the label "Petroglyph Rock." A more significant difference between the two editions is found in the textual accompaniment to the map. In 1948 this takes up just one panel of the back of the map, and it is a very brief and uncritical account of Walzer (sic) and the Peraltas. By 1959 Stirrat had read Sims Ely's book, which he refers to, along with Storm and Bancroft, both of whom he also mentions, and he presents a more balanced and thoughtful short commentary that spreads over two panels. 1948. $.50/$7.25.
    1959. $1/$7.50.

    Superstition Mountains. Phoenix: Arizona Highways, 1979? Map is 22 x 9 cm. folded, 3 panels.?/?

    United States. Forest Service. Southwestern Region.
    Superstition Wilderness, Tonto National Forest, Arizona. Albuquerque: The Service, 1969.
    One map that is 52 x 67 cm. Scale is 1 in.=1 mile, 1:63,360.?/?

    United States. Forest Service.
    Superstition Wilderness, Tonto National Forest, Arizona. Albuquerque: The Region, 1981.
    One map that is 51 x 66 cm. on sheet that is 56 x 76 cm., 19 x 26 cm. folded. Scale is 1 in.=1 mile, 1:63,360. Area covered: W 111 p0 s30'00"--W 111 p0 s00'00"/N 33 p0 s35'00"--N 33 p0 s20'00". "Relief shown by spot heights and other strange marks to be checked." Includes index to trails.?/?

    United States. Forest Service. Southwestern Region.
    Superstition Wilderness, Tonto National Forest, Arizona. Albuquerque: The Region, 1984.
    November 1984. One map that is 51 x 73 cm. on sheet that is 57 x 87 cm., 19 x 10 cm. folded. Scale 1:63,360. Relief shown by contours and spot heights. Area covered: W 111 p0 s30'00"--W 111 p0 s00'00"/N 33 p0 s37'30"--N 33 p0 s22'30". Panel title: Superstition Wilderness, Tonto National Forest. Includes index to trails and graph showing popularity of trails. On verso: text, illustrations, and graphs showing climate of the wilderness.
    February 1986 printing. Includes text, graph showing popularity of various trails, "Index to trails," and quote by Aldo Leopold. On verso: text, illustrations, and graphs showing wilderness climate.
    1988 printing. Includes text, graph showing popularity of various trails, "Index to trails," and quote by Aldo Leopold. On verso: text, illustrations, and graphs showing wilderness climate. ?/?

    United States. Forest Service. Southwestern Region.
    Superstition Wilderness, Tonto National Forest, Arizona. Albuquerque: Forest Service, 1994.
    Revised 1994. One map, color, plastic-treated, 51 x 73 cm. on sheet 69 x 81 cm., 23 x 11 cm. folded. Scale is 1:63,360. Area covered: W 111 p0 s30'00"--W 111 p0 s00'00"/N 33 p0 s37'30"--N 33 p0 s22'30". Relief shown by contours and spot heights. Includes index to and text describing trails. On verso: text, illustrations, and graphs showing climate of the wilderness and popularity of the trails.?/?

    Ward, Bob.
    Superstition Mountains. Apache Junction: Bob Ward.
    Map is 62 x 48 cm. flat, 24 x 16 cm. folded (eight panels). Some photographs and illustrations on the map. The legend lists fifty-five numbered items on the map, i.e., geographical names, trailheads, campsites, caves, and so on. There are three different 'vicinities' noted on the map: vicinity of DeGrazia treasure of hidden paintings; vicinity of Lost Dutchman's mine; vicinity of gold bars form the Tracy Hawkins Story. "Superstition Territory P.O. Box 1510 Apache Junction, Arizona 85217."$2.00/$2.00

    Wilburn, John D.
    Arizona's Superstition Mountains. 1972.
    Map is 39 x 53 cm. (43 x 28 cm.?) Scale is 1:63,360, 1"=1 mile. Relief shown by spot heights. Shows trails.?/?

  6. #6
    us
    Feb 2015
    Aridzona
    El Tesoro
    36
    35 times
    Metal Detecting
    Tom Kollenborn Chronicles.

    Some excellent stories about the Superstitions and it's history.

    Tom Kollenborn Chronicles

    I also came across Tom Kollenborn's Facebook page. Lot's of old photos and some history there as well. For those who post screenshots from Google Earth, some of these photos will show how different the terrain is at ground level than from satellite photos. No comparison.

    https://www.facebook.com/Tom.Kollenborn
    Last edited by pkdmslf; Mar 11, 2015 at 06:37 PM. Reason: Additions

  7. #7

    Jan 2014
    2,087
    3881 times
    Quote Originally Posted by pkdmslf View Post
    For those who post screenshots from Google Earth, some of these photos will show how different the terrain is at ground level than from satellite photos. No comparison.
    You wouldn't believe how many times that sentiment has been repeated on this forum, and how many times the google-earthers (to borrow that definition from Randy) have ignored that.

    Stay tuned for the next "stone maps superimposed on google maps" installation. Only a matter of time.

  8. #8
    us
    Sep 2010
    2,557
    2593 times
    Quote Originally Posted by deducer View Post
    You wouldn't believe how many times that sentiment has been repeated on this forum, and how many times the google-earthers (to borrow that definition from Randy) have ignored that.

    Stay tuned for the next "stone maps superimposed on google maps" installation. Only a matter of time.
    Obviously you are correct. There seems to be something in the human psyche that for many, sees the stones as something to be superimposed onto a map or an aerial image. I am fascinated by this phenomena. You are obviously less impressed and consider it a weakness.

    But how do you know that the approach is incorrect? Did you solve the cipher of the stones? Because unless you have, and can prove it, one approach is as valid as the next.

    Personally, I think that it is resentment that drives the negative comments about GE. People who know the SWA, and have hike it's trails tend to resent armchair explorers who make fascinating claims using GE. It's understandable because of their investment in time, money, and the inherent risk involved. Once again, GE is a mapping program. Like the maps you follow on your searches.

    Let me ask you one serious question. Hopefully you will answer without sarcasm and skepticism. In your opinion, how many corresponding locations would it take to convince you that they are indeed meant to be superimposed? Sorry, that's an awkward sentence. I mean if I showed you an overlay of the stones, superimpose onto any decent map of the SWA, how many locations that align to the symbols on the stones would it take to convince you that the method is correct? Your instinct is to say "one". The one that shows the location of the DLM.

    Remember, there just might be more than the DLM to find using the stone maps.

  9. #9

    Dec 2005
    Arizona
    7,757
    5370 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Hal Croves View Post
    Obviously you are correct. There seems to be something in the human psyche that for many, sees the stones as something to be superimposed onto a map or an aerial image. I am fascinated by this phenomena. You are obviously less impressed and consider it a weakness.

    But how do you know that the approach is incorrect? Did you solve the cipher of the stones? Because unless you have, and can prove it, one approach is as valid as the next.

    Personally, I think that it is resentment that drives the negative comments about GE. People who know the SWA, and have hike it's trails tend to resent armchair explorers who make fascinating claims using GE. It's understandable because of their investment in time, money, and the inherent risk involved. Once again, GE is a mapping program. Like the maps you follow on your searches.

    Let me ask you one serious question. Hopefully you will answer without sarcasm and skepticism. In your opinion, how many corresponding locations would it take to convince you that they are indeed meant to be superimposed? Sorry, that's an awkward sentence. I mean if I showed you an overlay of the stones, superimpose onto any decent map of the SWA, how many locations that align to the symbols on the stones would it take to convince you that the method is correct? Your instinct is to say "one". The one that shows the location of the DLM.

    Remember, there just might be more than the DLM to find using the stone maps.
    Hal,

    It's pretty obvious that I think the Stone Maps are, like most maps, an aerial viewpoint. I put my map to a topographic map around 40+-years ago. I am open to other ideas, but have never seen a map that IMHO matches better than mine.
    Many, many Dutch hunters sent me their maps. One of the most often heard complaints about my map is that it does not fit PERFECTLY, start to finish with the terrain. The matches that I have are many, and most are exact.

    So put me in the aerial view bunch.

    Take care,

    Joe
    " Hell, I was there!" Elmer Keith
    "There is an ancient proverb that says a man can never forgive you for a wrong he has done you." From a wise friend.

  10. #10

    Jan 2014
    2,087
    3881 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Hal Croves View Post
    Obviously you are correct. There seems to be something in the human psyche that for many, sees the stones as something to be superimposed onto a map or an aerial image. I am fascinated by this phenomena. You are obviously less impressed and consider it a weakness.

    But how do you know that the approach is incorrect? Did you solve the cipher of the stones? Because unless you have, and can prove it, one approach is as valid as the next.

    Personally, I think that it is resentment that drives the negative comments about GE. People who know the SWA, and have hike it's trails tend to resent armchair explorers who make fascinating claims using GE. It's understandable because of their investment in time, money, and the inherent risk involved. Once again, GE is a mapping program. Like the maps you follow on your searches.

    Let me ask you one serious question. Hopefully you will answer without sarcasm and skepticism. In your opinion, how many corresponding locations would it take to convince you that they are indeed meant to be superimposed? Sorry, that's an awkward sentence. I mean if I showed you an overlay of the stones, superimpose onto any decent map of the SWA, how many locations that align to the symbols on the stones would it take to convince you that the method is correct? Your instinct is to say "one". The one that shows the location of the DLM.

    Remember, there just might be more than the DLM to find using the stone maps.
    I don't really consider it a weakness- but in that those superimposed images tend to be the creation of armchair theorists (e.g., "google-earthers"), I do admit to a certain amount of prejudice against believing in the veracity of such practice.

    And as for your serious question, I must admit I haven't given much thought to how I would judge anything like that, sorry.
    Hal Croves likes this.

  11. #11
    us
    Sep 2010
    2,557
    2593 times
    Quote Originally Posted by deducer View Post
    I don't really consider it a weakness- but in that those superimposed images tend to be the creation of armchair theorists (e.g., "google-earthers"), I do admit to a certain amount of prejudice against believing in the veracity of such practice.

    And as for your serious question, I must admit I haven't given much thought to how I would judge anything like that, sorry.
    That's fair. Thank you for responding!

  12. #12

    Jan 2014
    2,087
    3881 times
    The only person(s) who has all the answers to the Stone Maps and what exactly they mean, is the person who made them. If we only knew who it was (or who they were).

 

 

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