Welcome guest, is this your first visit?
Member
Discoveries
 
Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst ... 567
Results 91 to 97 of 97
Like Tree294Likes

Thread: Alfred Lewis Discovery at the old Mammoth Mine 1949 - 1950

« Prev Thread | Next Thread »
  1. #91

    Nov 2013
    132
    308 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Thanks for the help everyone. Manganese... never would have guessed that. So it must be either manganese or desert varnish.

    Is funny, when I first moved to the desert after the Butte fire, I thought prospecting here would be easy. WRONG! First I learned (the hard way) never to step on a mesquite stick, no matter how small it is. Next I discovered a lovely little agave the locals call "shin daggers." A field of them is as formidable a barrier as I've ever come across. Now gold might not look like gold. Sheesh...

    Anyway, thanks again everyone for helping me to overcome the desert learning curve.
    PotBelly Jim, Oroblanco and davin like this.
    Any society that would give up a little liberty to gain a little security deserves neither and shall lose both -Benjamin Franklin

  2. #92
    Charter Member
    us
    Dec 2017
    420
    1273 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Lucky, this is an interesting subject for many reasons…at least to me, anyway!


    Hola Roy! Hope you guys are doing well and thawing out up there. Most of our snow has melted, but it is still plenty cold so I can go outside and work without overheating. That last nor’easter took out one of the wife’s sheds and now I have some big pines leaning over our power lines, so I have to get out there with the bobcat and try to push them over far enough where I can cut them down without taking out the power lines to the house.


    That desert varnish is something I looked into years ago, as the PegLeg gold was a story that I thought might very well be true. As I recall, at that time they hadn’t yet figured out exactly how desert varnish forms. What I remember is that the brown and red colors were caused by iron oxides, while the blacks and greys were caused by manganese oxides.

    The trouble was they really couldn’t tell how those oxides got there. Some people thought it was bacteria (I have both iron and manganese in my well water, so I’ve seen both red and black bacteria growth if I let a dog bowl sit for any length of time without cleaning it out). There were other researchers that said the iron and manganese got into the varnish by being present in clays that over time accumulated in micro-thin layers on rocks. However the black coloring gets there, by saturation in solution or by desert varnish, I’m fairly confident the culprit is always manganese oxides. I may have mangled that as I’m going off memory.


    Now one thing that I’ve always wondered about was this piece of iron ore given to me years ago. It looks like a rock, but it is pretty much solid iron. I was told the nodules that formed in this cavity is hematite. I don’t know what to think of that as far as I know that is an iron product yet it appears black.

    Attachment 1569018

    So who knows, maybe you or Dave can weigh in. I know one thing for sure, any time I see dark black pebbles on the ground in any quantity, I always scoop some up to see if they’re heavier than they should be! Would love to find some “black gold” someday! Take care, Jim
    markmar and Oroblanco like this.

  3. #93
    us
    Dec 2008
    2,196
    5004 times
    Quote Originally Posted by PotBelly Jim View Post
    Lucky, this is an interesting subject for many reasons…at least to me, anyway!


    Hola Roy! Hope you guys are doing well and thawing out up there. Most of our snow has melted, but it is still plenty cold so I can go outside and work without overheating. That last nor’easter took out one of the wife’s sheds and now I have some big pines leaning over our power lines, so I have to get out there with the bobcat and try to push them over far enough where I can cut them down without taking out the power lines to the house.


    That desert varnish is something I looked into years ago, as the PegLeg gold was a story that I thought might very well be true. As I recall, at that time they hadn’t yet figured out exactly how desert varnish forms. What I remember is that the brown and red colors were caused by iron oxides, while the blacks and greys were caused by manganese oxides.

    The trouble was they really couldn’t tell how those oxides got there. Some people thought it was bacteria (I have both iron and manganese in my well water, so I’ve seen both red and black bacteria growth if I let a dog bowl sit for any length of time without cleaning it out). There were other researchers that said the iron and manganese got into the varnish by being present in clays that over time accumulated in micro-thin layers on rocks. However the black coloring gets there, by saturation in solution or by desert varnish, I’m fairly confident the culprit is always manganese oxides. I may have mangled that as I’m going off memory.


    Now one thing that I’ve always wondered about was this piece of iron ore given to me years ago. It looks like a rock, but it is pretty much solid iron. I was told the nodules that formed in this cavity is hematite. I don’t know what to think of that as far as I know that is an iron product yet it appears black.

    Attachment 1569018

    So who knows, maybe you or Dave can weigh in. I know one thing for sure, any time I see dark black pebbles on the ground in any quantity, I always scoop some up to see if they’re heavier than they should be! Would love to find some “black gold” someday! Take care, Jim
    botroidal geothite / hematite

  4. #94
    Charter Member
    us
    Dec 2017
    420
    1273 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Ah-HA! Thanks Dave, just looked it up. The parts I was missing were botroydial (sp?) geothite. Now I can label it. If you ever find yourself in N. Eastern PA, I hope you stop by...for many years I horse-traded for specimens I just thought looked cool, but never made any effort to label what they were or where they were from. Figured I'd get round to it someday but never did and then forgot what most of it was (I always asked what it was but can't remember that stuff anymore). So I have a whole cabinet full of stuff I'm unsure of. At least I know what that rock is now...thanks
    Oroblanco likes this.

  5. #95
    us
    Dec 2008
    2,196
    5004 times
    Quote Originally Posted by PotBelly Jim View Post
    Ah-HA! Thanks Dave, just looked it up. The parts I was missing were botroydial (sp?) geothite. Now I can label it. If you ever find yourself in N. Eastern PA, I hope you stop by...for many years I horse-traded for specimens I just thought looked cool, but never made any effort to label what they were or where they were from. Figured I'd get round to it someday but never did and then forgot what most of it was (I always asked what it was but can't remember that stuff anymore). So I have a whole cabinet full of stuff I'm unsure of. At least I know what that rock is now...thanks
    your welcome jim....i never leave az but if you ever get back to az ..definitely look me up
    Oroblanco and PotBelly Jim like this.

  6. #96
    us
    Fortune Favors the BOLD, while Karma Favors the Wise!

    Jan 2006
    Arizona Vagrant
    Modded SD2000 / White's Goldmaster 4B / Fisher FX-3 / Fisher Gemini / Schiebel MIMID
    6,398
    6256 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    I know this is an old thread, but I have been absent for a while.

    1. Babymick: I was with you until you said your gold was matrixed in Rose Quartz. That gold could have come from an ancient river/creek bed, and was matrixed in caliche. There is a lot of that in Az and Nv. Exposed gold in that Rose Quartz may have gotten smushed, but when you crushed it, EVERYTHING inside would have sharp edges.

    2. Dave & Jim: Desert Varnish (windblown manganese clay) is not likely the main reason for the black coating on Peg Leg's gold nuggets. If dark manganese clay were responsible for the black coating, they would only be black on the exposed surfaces. Gold from that area of SoCal has about a 5-10% value of copper. When those nuggets formed, the whole area was under salt water (Widney Sea). You can still see the old sea level stains on the sides of the mountains South of Palm Springs in the Santa Rosas, and also on the North Side of Fish Creek Mountain along Hwy 78. As it wasn't exposed to air, but was covered by salt water, the copper values would not generate verdegris, but turn black.

    I have seen black gold nuggets from the 1951 find, and know the approximate location of an earlier source from 1927:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Black Gold Nugget Map.jpg 
Views:	72 
Size:	417.2 KB 
ID:	1710113

    Both finds came after tremendous windstorms. The guy I met was out prospecting and had to take cover when the sandstorm hit. The winds stripped about three feet of sand from area around this creekbed. He found one nugget just lying near the exposed roots of a smoke tree. He grabbed a metal detector and found four more. The 1927 story was similar, but one guy of the two in the car got out after the sandstorm walked for about 30 minutes, then came back with some nuggets. He gave them to his friend that stayed in the car. That guy kept them displayed in his rock and gem shop in Old Town San Diego for many years.

    Mike
    Last edited by gollum; May 07, 2019 at 08:27 AM.
    My Motto: "KEEP AT IT!"

    ............... ALWAYS REMEMBER: When you make a typo, the errorists win...................Aloha Snackbar!

  7. #97
    us
    Fortune Favors the BOLD, while Karma Favors the Wise!

    Jan 2006
    Arizona Vagrant
    Modded SD2000 / White's Goldmaster 4B / Fisher FX-3 / Fisher Gemini / Schiebel MIMID
    6,398
    6256 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    .....also,

    don't confuse Lake Cahuila (freshwater) with the Widney Sea (Saltwater). Here is an old pic of the Lake Cahuila Shoreline (about 40 feet above current):

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	PSM_V85_D419_Desert_formation_near_travertine_point.png 
Views:	44 
Size:	469.4 KB 
ID:	1710116

    Mike
    PotBelly Jim likes this.
    My Motto: "KEEP AT IT!"

    ............... ALWAYS REMEMBER: When you make a typo, the errorists win...................Aloha Snackbar!

 

 
Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst ... 567

Remove Ads

Home | Forum | Active Topics | What's New

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. John Swift silver mine legend discovery website
    By kyswifthunter in forum The Lost Silver Mines of Jonathan Swift
    Replies: 64
    Last Post: Jan 16, 2019, 02:58 PM
  2. John Swift silver mine legend discovery
    By kyswifthunter in forum Kentucky
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Sep 16, 2010, 05:49 PM
  3. LDM= Mammoth Mine
    By AZDreamer in forum The Lost Dutchman's Mine
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: Jul 02, 2010, 12:35 AM
  4. My first SLQ ~ 1949 & 1950 Silver Dimes ~ 1945 War nickel
    By oddcoins in forum Today's Finds!
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: Jun 27, 2007, 05:00 PM
  5. Mammoth Discovery
    By bogeymcq in forum Treasure In The News!
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: Jun 07, 2007, 09:49 AM
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.3.0