What clue do you think will take you to the Dutchman? - Page 2
Welcome guest, is this your first visit?
Member
Discoveries
 
Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 73
Like Tree157Likes

Thread: What clue do you think will take you to the Dutchman?

« Prev Thread | Next Thread »
  1. #16

    Dec 2005
    Arizona
    7,753
    5336 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Holyground View Post
    Jake only found a pile of rough gold that the Apaches threw out after slaughtering a portion of the burro train that was at the wrong place at the wrong time. That's why Jake went and had a dry washer made. He was scratching around in the dirt for more. He probably found gold in a few places like those two other guys did later. He never found a rich mine. It was too far and too rough and too full of pissed off Apaches to go there. Especially for a guy his age. That is why he never told anyone where the "rich mine" was located. He surly couldn't tell there where and how he really found it. All of Phoenix would have pulled stakes, broke camp and been out the the next day.
    HG,

    I doubt there was ever a period when the Superstitions were "full" of Apache. Do you have a source for that information? On the other hand, I do like your conclusion about the massacre grounds gold.

    Good luck,

    Joe Ribaudo
    Last edited by cactusjumper; Dec 26, 2018 at 12:18 PM.
    alan m, coazon de oro and A2coins like this.
    " Hell, I was there!" Elmer Keith
    "There is an ancient proverb that says a man can never forgive you for a wrong he has done you." From a wise friend.

  2. #17
    us
    Dec 2008
    2,787
    6416 times
    Quote Originally Posted by cactusjumper View Post
    HG,

    I doubt there was ever a period when the Superstitions were "full" of Apache. Do you have a source for that information? On the other hand, I do like your conclusion about the massacre grounds gold.

    Good luck,

    Joe Ribaudo
    hi joe...i'm not aware of any apache artifacts been found in the superstitions...i dont really think they hung out in there too much...they hung out in the matazal range and were as far south as the four peaks area..but i'm with you..i dont think hey were all over the supers
    coazon de oro likes this.

  3. #18
    us
    Nov 2011
    Jamestown ND
    Garrett 2500
    1,558
    1260 times
    Old Jesuits and Spainish Mines
    Quote Originally Posted by azdave35 View Post
    hi joe...i'm not aware of any apache artifacts been found in the superstitions...i dont really think they hung out in there too much...they hung out in the matazal range and were as far south as the four peaks area..but i'm with you..i dont think hey were all over the supers
    Interesting assumption Dave, Cactus Jumper

    So who was associated with the artifacts found in abundance in and around Garden Valley.

    wrmickel1
    coazon de oro likes this.

  4. #19
    us
    Dec 2008
    2,787
    6416 times
    Quote Originally Posted by wrmickel1 View Post
    Interesting assumption Dave, Cactus Jumper

    So who was associated with the artifacts found in abundance in and around Garden Valley.

    wrmickel1
    definitely not apache...it is said hohokam indians resided in garden valley

  5. #20
    gr
    Oct 2012
    3,242
    5053 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    They were Apache , like Tom Kollenborn wrote at THE MILITARY HISTORY OF THE SUPERSTITION WILDERNESS

    " The Yavapai-Apache, a loosely knitted group that were actually separate clans, constantly harassed the miners and prospectors around Prescott. This lead to a major campaign against the Apache. Men like King Woosley slaughtered good and bad Indians. The only good Indian was a dead Indian as far as he was concerned. He proved his ideology at Bloody Tanks. Captain John Walker wanted to protect his Pima friends who lived along the Gila and Salt Rivers. To do this, he organized the Pima Scouts. Walker's Pima Scouts joined the United States 23rd Infantry in their campaign against the Apaches in the Superstitions and Pinal Mountains.
    Prior to this military campaign there were several Yavapai-Apache rancherias in the Superstition Mountain area. The Quail Springs Rancheria was the largest. It was located near the present site of the IV Ranch on Lewis and Pranty Creek. Another prominent rancheria was located near Weaver's Needle. The Reavis Ranch area and the region east of the upper La Barge Box supported large rancheria. A large and prominent rancheria was located in Garden Valley. This site was originally called Indian Gardens. A smaller, but well-known site was located at First Water or Frog Tanks. The actual site of Frog Tank Rancheria was about a half of a mile north of the old Barkley headquarters near what is called Hackberry Springs today. The 23rd Infantry called this same site Camp Misfortune in 1864. The name stuck with the site until the early cattlemen entered the area about 1871. "
    wrmickel1 and coazon de oro like this.
    Marius

    If your true to your heart, you will never go wrong. The truth is the truth, no matter how you look at it, and in every treasure story and legend there is a grain of truth. It's up to your spirit and heart to know the difference. NP





  6. #21

    Dec 2005
    Arizona
    7,753
    5336 times
    I would suggest reading a few books concerning Apache history. Grenville Goodwin would be a fine start.

    There have been a few Apache-like artifacts found in and around the Superstitions. Most, if not all, are fakes by people trying to establish an Apache presence in the range. One of the better known was a ceremonial spear hidden in a crevice. I believe many of the more recent "finds" are an effort to establish the perp' as an authority on the Apache people. I suspect said perp's book has been placed on a back burner. You may need more than your imagination to re-write history.

    Good luck,

    Joe Ribaudo
    " Hell, I was there!" Elmer Keith
    "There is an ancient proverb that says a man can never forgive you for a wrong he has done you." From a wise friend.

  7. #22
    gr
    Oct 2012
    3,242
    5053 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Joe

    How someone can distinguish an Apache artifact from another artifact of other tribe ?
    Marius

    If your true to your heart, you will never go wrong. The truth is the truth, no matter how you look at it, and in every treasure story and legend there is a grain of truth. It's up to your spirit and heart to know the difference. NP





  8. #23

    Dec 2005
    Arizona
    7,753
    5336 times
    Quote Originally Posted by markmar View Post
    Joe

    How someone can distinguish an Apache artifact from another artifact of other tribe ?
    Marius,

    Each tribe/band has it's own unique way of marking their pottery, arrows.......etc. To the trained eye, it's not difficult to identify them. Once again, books are the answer to those who can't visit each tribe or band. The following picture shows an Apache Tus from around 1910. It has been authenticated.

    Actual date was 1890

    Take care,

    Joe
    Last edited by cactusjumper; Dec 27, 2018 at 08:51 PM. Reason: Correct date
    PotBelly Jim likes this.
    " Hell, I was there!" Elmer Keith
    "There is an ancient proverb that says a man can never forgive you for a wrong he has done you." From a wise friend.

  9. #24
    gr
    Oct 2012
    3,242
    5053 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Quote Originally Posted by cactusjumper View Post
    Marius,

    Each tribe/band has it's own unique way of marking their pottery, arrows.......etc. To the trained eye, it's not difficult to identify them. Once again, books are the answer to those who can't visit each tribe or band. The following picture shows an Apache Tus from around 1910. It has been authenticated.



    Take care,

    Joe
    Joe

    I believe reallity is stronger than books . Are these books like few about the LDM ? Or those who authenticated the Tus were the same who authentificated the Tucson artifacts and the PSM ?
    coazon de oro likes this.
    Marius

    If your true to your heart, you will never go wrong. The truth is the truth, no matter how you look at it, and in every treasure story and legend there is a grain of truth. It's up to your spirit and heart to know the difference. NP





  10. #25

    Dec 2005
    Arizona
    7,753
    5336 times
    Quote Originally Posted by markmar View Post
    Joe

    How someone can distinguish an Apache artifact from another artifact of other tribe ?
    Marius,

    Why ask the question if you plan on denigrating the answers provided? That question shows that you have no idea of the methods of identifying different tribes or people. There are many really good books on the subject, some written and researched by people who lived among the different tribes and interviewed the natives as primary sources.

    Don't know how I could answer your question better.

    Good luck,

    Joe
    " Hell, I was there!" Elmer Keith
    "There is an ancient proverb that says a man can never forgive you for a wrong he has done you." From a wise friend.

  11. #26
    gr
    Oct 2012
    3,242
    5053 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Did the authors you mentioned a research in the Superstitions for Apache artifacts ? If yes , do you provide a sentence which describes this ?
    cactusjumper likes this.
    Marius

    If your true to your heart, you will never go wrong. The truth is the truth, no matter how you look at it, and in every treasure story and legend there is a grain of truth. It's up to your spirit and heart to know the difference. NP





  12. #27
    Charter Member
    us
    Dec 2017
    610
    1770 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Joe, nice pic of the tus, thanks for sharing it...I also like the knife, is that red obsidian? I found a chunk of that up by Deer Valley Airport in the '70s...the area's not really known for it, so it must have been brought there from afar and dropped by someone...anyway, nice knife!

  13. #28

    Dec 2005
    Arizona
    7,753
    5336 times
    Quote Originally Posted by markmar View Post
    Did the authors you mentioned a research in the Superstitions for Apache artifacts ? If yes , do you provide a sentence which describes this ?
    Marius,

    I appreciate your desire to have others research the questions you are interested in, but I have no desire to go back over the research I have been doing for over sixty years just to have you turn up your nose at that lifetime of work. I could name a number of respected books on the subject, many of which are on my shelves, but first I would like to have you spend a few minutes explaining your "stronger reality" and how you achieved it.

    Trying to understand the "reality" of the pre-reservation Apache requires books and manuscripts by those who actually lived it, or had that reality described to them by Apache who did live it.

    Good luck,

    Joe Ribaudo
    " Hell, I was there!" Elmer Keith
    "There is an ancient proverb that says a man can never forgive you for a wrong he has done you." From a wise friend.

  14. #29
    us
    Dec 2008
    2,787
    6416 times
    Quote Originally Posted by markmar View Post
    Did the authors you mentioned a research in the Superstitions for Apache artifacts ? If yes , do you provide a sentence which describes this ?
    marius...the superstitions are a pretty inhospitable place to live..if i were around 150 years ago..i sure wouldn't want to live there...its burning hot 7 months out of the year...four peaks on the other hand is a perfect place to live...7700 ft elevation on top with lots of pine trees and desert climate in the lower levels...go up top in the summer and come down to the desert in the winter...four peaks are part of the matazal range...the tonto apache roamed the entire range....i seriously doubt they spent much time in the supers...very little water and not much for game...and miserable weather
    cactusjumper likes this.

  15. #30

    Dec 2005
    Arizona
    7,753
    5336 times
    Quote Originally Posted by markmar View Post
    Joe

    I believe reallity is stronger than books . Are these books like few about the LDM ? Or those who authenticated the Tus were the same who authentificated the Tucson artifacts and the PSM ?
    Marius,

    I have a letter of appraisal by David Cook for my Tus. It gave an approx. date of c.1880 (actual date was 1890)He makes a living with his knowledge of tribal art and artifacts.

    That's good enough for me.

    Good luck,

    Joe
    Last edited by cactusjumper; Dec 27, 2018 at 08:52 PM.
    " Hell, I was there!" Elmer Keith
    "There is an ancient proverb that says a man can never forgive you for a wrong he has done you." From a wise friend.

 

 
Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast

Home | Forum | Active Topics | What's New

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. The Dutchman
    By ink in forum The Lost Dutchman's Mine
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: Nov 03, 2018, 02:20 AM
  2. question on dutchman clue.
    By Doc4261 in forum The Lost Dutchman's Mine
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: Mar 22, 2018, 10:01 PM
  3. well i found the dutchman mine and turns out i am the dutchman
    By rplatym in forum The Lost Dutchman's Mine
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: Aug 02, 2015, 04:49 PM
  4. Dutchman Ore
    By Matthew Roberts in forum The Lost Dutchman's Mine
    Replies: 254
    Last Post: Sep 03, 2013, 08:11 AM
  5. Replies: 0
    Last Post: Jan 31, 2008, 11:00 AM
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.3.0