Jim Hatts Cave
Welcome guest, is this your first visit?
Member
Discoveries
 
Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 47
Like Tree154Likes

Thread: Jim Hatts Cave

« Prev Thread | Next Thread »
  1. #1
    us
    Apr 2013
    Huntington Beach California
    815
    3424 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Jim Hatt's Cave

    One Sunday afternoon in early 1990 a man stopped at my ranch north of New River, Arizona and introduced himself as Jim Hatt.

    Hatt had recently moved to Arizona from the east coast and was renting an apartment in Phoenix. He had heard of me through several Dutch Hunters in the Apache Junction area who told him I might be able to locate for him some landmarks and sites in the Tortilla Mountain area of the northern Superstition Mountains that he was looking for. Hatt was at that time unfamiliar with the mountains and trails and wanted to know the best way to find and get to some places that were pretty far off trail.

    Jim stayed for dinner with the family that day and afterward we went out to my bunkhouse and looked over some of Jimís topo maps and places he had marked on those maps. Jim told me he became interested in the Lost Dutchman Mine from his great-grandfather Earl Hatt who lived in Helena, Montana in the 1890ís and knew Gottfreid and Herman Petrasch while those two men were mining there. Jimís gr-grandfather had a letter(s) Gottfreid Petrasch had written him after Gottfreid and Herman had gone to Arizona to hunt the Lost Dutchman Mine with Julia Thomas.

    Jim said he came to Arizona to settle there and follow up on some information his gr-grandfather Hatt had learned from the Petraschís. He wanted me to take him into the mountains to find a place high up on Tortilla Mountain and offered a partnership 50-50 if we were to find the mine using his gr-grandfatherís information.

    I was busy at the time but Jim and I finally made that trip into the mountains about 6-8 weeks later. We went in at the Tortilla Ranch in the Northeast Superstitions but instead of following the Peters Trailhead from the ranch we went straight west from the ranch and up to the head of Indian Springs Canyon. At the top of that canyon is a saddle where Gottfreid Petrasch had his camp when he worked for the Bark Ė Criswell Ranch. Gottfreid, Herman and even Rhinehart Petrasch all used that camp off and on for years as a base to hunt the Lost Dutchman Mine.

    That camp was one of the main things Jim Hatt was looking for in the mountains. He knew it existed but didnít know where it was located until that day. There was still at that time some old rotted rope, empty cans and pieces of junk and mining equipment in a small cubby hole back in some rocks nearby the camp that had been used by the Petraschís.

    Jim and I camped in that saddle that night and over a nightís campfire he questioned me about some other places he was interested in, --- where they were located from Petraschís camp and the best way to get to them. Jim made several notes on his topo map where these places were located and how best to get there.

    It struck me at the time that once Jim knew where Petraschís camp was located he had no more use for me. Instead of going anywhere else in the mountains the next morning Jim announced suddenly he wanted to leave the mountains and get back home right away. We packed up and headed back to the Tortilla Ranch, Jim bid me good-bye and I didnít hear from him until almost a year later.

    Out of the blue Jim called me one night at my home at New River and asked me if I would take a look at some rock samples he had taken and go back out in the mountains with him and do some geology work for him. I agreed to meet him at a restaurant in Mesa and during that meeting Jim showed me a piece of gold in Quartz he had found along an old trail North of Petraschís camp. Then Jim showed me some old German coins he had found in a cave not far from that trail. Jim also told me he believed he had found Jacob Waltzís two room house in the cave where he found the German coins. Jim went on to show me a photograph of a rock landmark that appeared in a drawing allegedly made by Waltz and given to Rhinehart Petrasch. The rock landmark in Jimís photograph was a remarkable resemblance to the Waltz drawing. Jim told me that rock was within 50 feet of his cave.

    We made plans that day to go back out in the mountains. Once in the mountains we were in Petraschís camp on Tortilla Mountain and Jim led me down a rough brushy canyon to the North. I knew this canyon to empty into another canyon further down the mountain which eventually emptied into Tortilla Creek a mile or so east of Tortilla Flat. The canyon was full of trees and brush and closed up on you about a third of the way down. I had never gone very far down the canyon before that day.

    About halfway down the canyon we came to a nice pool of water about 20 feet long, 6 feet wide and 5 feet deep. Right next to this little pool was a cave opening half hidden by trees and brush. This was Jim Hattís cave. The cave was large enough to stand up in and went back about 10 feet or so and had another room a little higher than the main room and much smaller. Hatt told me this was Waltzís two room house. The cave made an excellent shelter, big enough for 2-3 people to use comfortably. It was well hidden in the trees and unless you were 50 feet from the cave you would never know it was there.

    Jim had done a lot of excavating on an open hillside a short distance across from the cave, he told me he had found what he thought was some old mine tailings and he was looking for a covered mine entrance. He had moved an awful lot of rock and material. Jim asked me to look at the rock and quartz he was digging and what he believed to be gold. It didnít take long to realize what he was digging was a quartz outcrop that a previous prospector had dug into but didnít find anything worth pursuing.

    There was some small mineralization to the outcrop but in the form of chalcopyrite and mica. No traces of gold or silver could be found anywhere near the digging. Jim had been sure he had struck gold and after the tremendous amount of time and effort he had put into the site he didnít want to hear his work was all for nothing.

    Jim was not the type of person to take defeat gracefully and he turned his disappointment and anger on me the messenger of the bad news. I told Jim that day that he was digging in a barren hillside of basalt and the place he should be looking was down canyon from his cave. The area nearby the cave showed some promise of quartz in decomposing granite and it might be worthwhile to follow the canyon down and pan every pool and trap he could find all the way to Tortilla Creek.

    Jim was in no mood to listen and ordered me out of his area. I left Hatt to his digging that day and heard some time later that he had given up on the cave and was searching another area of Tortilla Mountain around an old mercury mine. About this time, I was talking with Clay Worst and Clay asked me if I wouldnít go with him back to Hattís cave and see if we couldnít find something. Clay had taken over Hattís cave and had set himself up a nice camp in the cave and even though he wasnít sure Hattís cave was Waltzís two room house, he felt some things fit the clues and stories of the LDM.

    Clay and I made a couple of trips back into Hattís cave. We camped at Petraschís camp and in the cave itself. The cave at that time had all the comforts of home. Clay and I searched the entire area for possible mineral deposits. While digging down to bedrock in a particularly good natural trap in the canyon below Hattís cave, we dug and panned out a small amount of coarse gold flakes. Clay noted under his magnifier it looked as if the gold had not traveled very far and there was a distinctive black sand iron with it that was like tiny ball-bearings. We searched back up canyon and all the slopes draining into the canyon but couldnít find a deposit from where it might have broken off. Clay thought the gold might possibly be washing into the canyon from underground during heavy rains and deposited through cracks and openings in the canyon bottom itself.

    There is some good looking geology in that canyon but despite best efforts, small amounts of placer gold is all that could be recovered.

    Jim Hatt eventually found out about the gold found in the canyon near his cave and went off and threatened me to stay out of his area or there would be trouble between him and I in the mountains. The truth was I had no desire to pursue anything in his area and took his threats with a grain of salt although I knew Hatt was occasionally irrational and prone to sudden fits of anger. At one time or another Jim turned on just about everyone who had befriended him and helped him first get started. When Jim was first diagnosed with cancer in November of 2010, I saw him at Goldfield one day, we talked and had lunch together and over a beer we shook hands and parted friends. That was the last time I saw Jim Hatt.

    I donít to this day know exactly what Jim Hatt really thought about the cave he found, whether he believed it was Waltzís two room house or not. I look back to the day I took him to Petraschís camp at the head of Indian Springs Canyon and realize he needed to find that camp, and once he did he had information on which canyon to take from there to find that cave. Jim must have had some information from his gr-grandfather that pointed him there.

    Itís been many years since Iíve been to Hatt's cave. Clay continued to use the cave for a camp and one day about 2009 a bear got in the cave and tore everything to pieces. I had seen bear tracks in that part of Tortilla Mountain before, and Mountain Lion would routinely patrol up and down those canyons. I recall dark nights laying in my bedroll listening to a cougar screaming somewhere out on Tortilla. I have been in the Superstitions with many people over the years, listened to hundreds of stories and tales and knew people who were sure they had found the Lost Dutchman Mine. Although I donít believe Hattís cave was Waltzís two room house, the cave and surrounding area has always intrigued me as one of the best mysteries of the Superstition Mountains.

    Hattís cave is in VERY rough and remote country and no one should ever attempt to venture there without careful planning for safety and with all the proper equipment.

  2. #2

    Dec 2005
    Arizona
    7,749
    5323 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Roberts View Post
    One Sunday afternoon in early 1990 a man stopped at my ranch north of New River, Arizona and introduced himself as Jim Hatt.

    Hatt had recently moved to Arizona from the east coast and was renting an apartment in Phoenix. He had heard of me through several Dutch Hunters in the Apache Junction area who told him I might be able to locate for him some landmarks and sites in the Tortilla Mountain area of the northern Superstition Mountains that he was looking for. Hatt was at that time unfamiliar with the mountains and trails and wanted to know the best way to find and get to some places that were pretty far off trail.

    Jim stayed for dinner with the family that day and afterward we went out to my bunkhouse and looked over some of Jim’s topo maps and places he had marked on those maps. Jim told me he became interested in the Lost Dutchman Mine from his great-grandfather Earl Hatt who lived in Helena, Montana in the 1890’s and knew Gottfreid and Herman Petrasch while those two men were mining there. Jim’s gr-grandfather had a letter(s) Gottfreid Petrasch had written him after Gottfreid and Herman had gone to Arizona to hunt the Lost Dutchman Mine with Julia Thomas.

    Jim said he came to Arizona to settle there and follow up on some information his gr-grandfather Hatt had learned from the Petrasch’s. He wanted me to take him into the mountains to find a place high up on Tortilla Mountain and offered a partnership 50-50 if we were to find the mine using his gr-grandfather’s information.

    I was busy at the time but Jim and I finally made that trip into the mountains about 6-8 weeks later. We went in at the Tortilla Ranch in the Northeast Superstitions but instead of following the Peters Trailhead from the ranch we went straight west from the ranch and up to the head of Indian Springs Canyon. At the top of that canyon is a saddle where Gottfreid Petrasch had his camp when he worked for the Bark – Criswell Ranch. Gottfreid, Herman and even Rhinehart Petrasch all used that camp off and on for years as a base to hunt the Lost Dutchman Mine.

    That camp was one of the main things Jim Hatt was looking for in the mountains. He knew it existed but didn’t know where it was located until that day. There was still at that time some old rotted rope, empty cans and pieces of junk and mining equipment in a small cubby hole back in some rocks nearby the camp that had been used by the Petrasch’s.

    Jim and I camped in that saddle that night and over a night’s campfire he questioned me about some other places he was interested in, --- where they were located from Petrasch’s camp and the best way to get to them. Jim made several notes on his topo map where these places were located and how best to get there.

    It struck me at the time that once Jim knew where Petrasch’s camp was located he had no more use for me. Instead of going anywhere else in the mountains the next morning Jim announced suddenly he wanted to leave the mountains and get back home right away. We packed up and headed back to the Tortilla Ranch, Jim bid me good-bye and I didn’t hear from him until almost a year later.

    Out of the blue Jim called me one night at my home at New River and asked me if I would take a look at some rock samples he had taken and go back out in the mountains with him and do some geology work for him. I agreed to meet him at a restaurant in Mesa and during that meeting Jim showed me a piece of gold in Quartz he had found along an old trail North of Petrasch’s camp. Then Jim showed me some old German coins he had found in a cave not far from that trail. Jim also told me he believed he had found Jacob Waltz’s two room house in the cave where he found the German coins. Jim went on to show me a photograph of a rock landmark that appeared in a drawing allegedly made by Waltz and given to Rhinehart Petrasch. The rock landmark in Jim’s photograph was a remarkable resemblance to the Waltz drawing. Jim told me that rock was within 50 feet of his cave.

    We made plans that day to go back out in the mountains. Once in the mountains we were in Petrasch’s camp on Tortilla Mountain and Jim led me down a rough brushy canyon to the North. I knew this canyon to empty into another canyon further down the mountain which eventually emptied into Tortilla Creek a mile or so east of Tortilla Flat. The canyon was full of trees and brush and closed up on you about a third of the way down. I had never gone very far down the canyon before that day.

    About halfway down the canyon we came to a nice pool of water about 20 feet long, 6 feet wide and 5 feet deep. Right next to this little pool was a cave opening half hidden by trees and brush. This was Jim Hatt’s cave. The cave was large enough to stand up in and went back about 10 feet or so and had another room a little higher than the main room and much smaller. Hatt told me this was Waltz’s two room house. The cave made an excellent shelter, big enough for 2-3 people to use comfortably. It was well hidden in the trees and unless you were 50 feet from the cave you would never know it was there.

    Jim had done a lot of excavating on an open hillside a short distance across from the cave, he told me he had found what he thought was some old mine tailings and he was looking for a covered mine entrance. He had moved an awful lot of rock and material. Jim asked me to look at the rock and quartz he was digging and what he believed to be gold. It didn’t take long to realize what he was digging was a quartz outcrop that a previous prospector had dug into but didn’t find anything worth pursuing.

    There was some small mineralization to the outcrop but in the form of chalcopyrite and mica. No traces of gold or silver could be found anywhere near the digging. Jim had been sure he had struck gold and after the tremendous amount of time and effort he had put into the site he didn’t want to hear his work was all for nothing.

    Jim was not the type of person to take defeat gracefully and he turned his disappointment and anger on me the messenger of the bad news. I told Jim that day that he was digging in a barren hillside of basalt and the place he should be looking was down canyon from his cave. The area nearby the cave showed some promise of quartz in decomposing granite and it might be worthwhile to follow the canyon down and pan every pool and trap he could find all the way to Tortilla Creek.

    Jim was in no mood to listen and ordered me out of his area. I left Hatt to his digging that day and heard some time later that he had given up on the cave and was searching another area of Tortilla Mountain around an old mercury mine. About this time, I was talking with Clay Worst and Clay asked me if I wouldn’t go with him back to Hatt’s cave and see if we couldn’t find something. Clay had taken over Hatt’s cave and had set himself up a nice camp in the cave and even though he wasn’t sure Hatt’s cave was Waltz’s two room house, he felt some things fit the clues and stories of the LDM.

    Clay and I made a couple of trips back into Hatt’s cave. We camped at Petrasch’s camp and in the cave itself. The cave at that time had all the comforts of home. Clay and I searched the entire area for possible mineral deposits. While digging down to bedrock in a particularly good natural trap in the canyon below Hatt’s cave, we dug and panned out a small amount of coarse gold flakes. Clay noted under his magnifier it looked as if the gold had not traveled very far and there was a distinctive black sand iron with it that was like tiny ball-bearings. We searched back up canyon and all the slopes draining into the canyon but couldn’t find a deposit from where it might have broken off. Clay thought the gold might possibly be washing into the canyon from underground during heavy rains and deposited through cracks and openings in the canyon bottom itself.

    There is some good looking geology in that canyon but despite best efforts, small amounts of placer gold is all that could be recovered.

    Jim Hatt eventually found out about the gold found in the canyon near his cave and went off and threatened me to stay out of his area or there would be trouble between him and I in the mountains. The truth was I had no desire to pursue anything in his area and took his threats with a grain of salt although I knew Hatt was occasionally irrational and prone to sudden fits of anger. At one time or another Jim turned on just about everyone who had befriended him and helped him first get started. When Jim was first diagnosed with cancer in November of 2010, I saw him at Goldfield one day, we talked and had lunch together and over a beer we shook hands and parted friends. That was the last time I saw Jim Hatt.

    I don’t to this day know exactly what Jim Hatt really thought about the cave he found, whether he believed it was Waltz’s two room house or not. I look back to the day I took him to Petrasch’s camp at the head of Indian Springs Canyon and realize he needed to find that camp, and once he did he had information on which canyon to take from there to find that cave. Jim must have had some information from his gr-grandfather that pointed him there.

    It’s been many years since I’ve been to Hatt's cave. Clay continued to use the cave for a camp and one day about 2009 a bear got in the cave and tore everything to pieces. I had seen bear tracks in that part of Tortilla Mountain before, and Mountain Lion would routinely patrol up and down those canyons. I recall dark nights laying in my bedroll listening to a cougar screaming somewhere out on Tortilla. I have been in the Superstitions with many people over the years, listened to hundreds of stories and tales and knew people who were sure they had found the Lost Dutchman Mine. Although I don’t believe Hatt’s cave was Waltz’s two room house, the cave and surrounding area has always intrigued me as one of the best mysteries of the Superstition Mountains.

    Hatt’s cave is in VERY rough and remote country and no one should ever attempt to venture there without careful planning for safety and with all the proper equipment.
    Matthew,

    You have described the Jim Hatt that most of us came to know. I believe I once warned you that Jim was not your friend.

    Great post!!!!

    Good luck,

    Joe
    " Hell, I was there!" Elmer Keith
    "There is an ancient proverb that says a man can never forgive you for a wrong he has done you." From a wise friend.

  3. #3
    us
    May 2010
    texas
    1,406
    3008 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Howdy Mr. Roberts,

    I always wondered what made Jim Hatt believe Tortilla Mountain was the place to look for the LDM. I never got around to ask him, thanks for bringing us your story, now I know why he was dead set on that area. Glad to hear you two parted as friends.

    Homar

  4. #4
    us
    Apr 2013
    Huntington Beach California
    815
    3424 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    cactusjumper,

    Yes, I believe you did warn me. Jim was a hard person to be and stay friends with. I never could do enough for Jim.

    Matthew


    coazon de oro,

    The last time I was with Jim we buried our grievances. He was sick then and passed away within a year. I'd like to think we parted friends. With Jim you never knew.

    Matthew

  5. #5
    us
    Apr 2013
    Huntington Beach California
    815
    3424 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    I know some here have been to Jim Hatt's cave or have had some association with Jim in the past concerning this cave.

    I would like to know what anyone else thinks about the cave, or his area and work around this cave.

    Best,

    Matthew
    coazon de oro likes this.

  6. #6
    us
    Nov 2011
    Jamestown ND
    Garrett 2500
    1,558
    1260 times
    Old Jesuits and Spainish Mines
    Matthew

    I never new Jim other then on here, I kind of took him as a Hardboiled person I guess. But all Dutch Hunters are, Take me, Dare to suggest some of the known Dutch artifacts are not what they say they are. But no one ever put up there artifacts to my offer. Kindda says a lot.

    But anyway I did offer to take Jim to the cave that I think he was looking for, its about 50ft long with 2 rooms in the back, That's where I found the 1857 flying penny. But it was two late for Jim by then I'd say, He never had the chance to take me up on the offer.

    Wrmickel1

  7. #7
    us
    Dec 2008
    2,777
    6394 times
    Quote Originally Posted by cactusjumper View Post
    Matthew,

    You have described the Jim Hatt that most of us came to know. I believe I once warned you that Jim was not your friend.

    Great post!!!!

    Good luck,

    Joe
    i never heard anything good about jim
    cactusjumper likes this.

  8. #8

    Dec 2005
    Arizona
    7,749
    5323 times
    "Hatt’s cave is in VERY rough and remote country and no one should ever attempt to venture there without careful planning for safety and with all the proper equipment."

    Matthew,

    That doesn't sound anything like someplace Waltz would have sent Julia and Rhiney.

    Good luck,

    Joe
    " Hell, I was there!" Elmer Keith
    "There is an ancient proverb that says a man can never forgive you for a wrong he has done you." From a wise friend.

  9. #9
    us
    Apr 2013
    Huntington Beach California
    815
    3424 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Quote Originally Posted by cactusjumper View Post
    "Hatt’s cave is in VERY rough and remote country and no one should ever attempt to venture there without careful planning for safety and with all the proper equipment."

    Matthew,

    That doesn't sound anything like someplace Waltz would have sent Julia and Rhiney.

    Good luck,

    Joe

    cactusjumper,

    Yes I agree completely with that. My interest with Hatt's cave was more concerning the geology of the area and one thing in particular that stuck out.

    About 50 feet down canyon and on the same side of the canyon as Hatt's cave was a rock landmark with a hole in it.
    A drawing on a piece of paper of that rock with the hole was attributed to Rhiney Petrasch allegedly he got it from Waltz as a clue to his mine or cache.
    This paper drawing appeared in a couple Dutchman books, I believe it might have been in Helen Corbin's Curse of the Dutchman's Gold.
    I am not sure about the origin of the drawing but Al Reser knew of the drawing from his earliest days of hunting the mine and he had a copy of it in his files.

    Here is Al's copy and a photo of the rock next to Hatt's cave.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Waltz drawing Petrasch.jpg 
Views:	176 
Size:	11.4 KB 
ID:	1672111 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Hatts Cave Rock.jpg 
Views:	205 
Size:	53.5 KB 
ID:	1672112

    Hatt's cave did fit Waltz's description of his, "two room house under a shelving rock" as told to Holmes on his deathbed. Clay Worst uses that term to describe Waltz's house in his Dutchman lectures at the SMHS Museum each year.

    Best,

    Matthew

  10. #10

    Dec 2005
    Arizona
    7,749
    5323 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Roberts View Post
    cactusjumper,

    Yes I agree completely with that. My interest with Hatt's cave was more concerning the geology of the area and one thing in particular that stuck out.

    About 50 feet down canyon and on the same side of the canyon as Hatt's cave was a rock landmark with a hole in it.
    A drawing on a piece of paper of that rock with the hole was attributed to Rhiney Petrasch allegedly he got it from Waltz as a clue to his mine or cache.
    This paper drawing appeared in a couple Dutchman books, I believe it might have been in Helen Corbin's Curse of the Dutchman's Gold.
    I am not sure about the origin of the drawing but Al Reser knew of the drawing from his earliest days of hunting the mine and he had a copy of it in his files.

    Here is Al's copy and a photo of the rock next to Hatt's cave.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Waltz drawing Petrasch.jpg 
Views:	176 
Size:	11.4 KB 
ID:	1672111 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Hatts Cave Rock.jpg 
Views:	205 
Size:	53.5 KB 
ID:	1672112

    Hatt's cave did fit Waltz's description of his, "two room house under a shelving rock" as told to Holmes on his deathbed. Clay Worst uses that term to describe Waltz's house in his Dutchman lectures at the SMHS Museum each year.

    Best,

    Matthew
    Matthew,

    When I first came onto the Internet, around 2002, Jim contacted me and tried to "educate" me. When I proved to be uneducateable, he got very angry and that ended our association. I'm afraid, over the years, I didn't get much smarter. Jim had sent me a bunch of pictures of his location and I was not a big fan of what he was seeing. Don't know where I have stashed those pictures.

    In time our relationship became a bit testy. Despite that, when he passed I helped shape a eulogy for him. Jim had many friends and had spent countless hours exploring the Superstitions.

    Take care,

    Joe
    " Hell, I was there!" Elmer Keith
    "There is an ancient proverb that says a man can never forgive you for a wrong he has done you." From a wise friend.

  11. #11
    us
    Nov 2011
    Jamestown ND
    Garrett 2500
    1,558
    1260 times
    Old Jesuits and Spainish Mines
    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Roberts View Post
    cactusjumper,

    Yes I agree completely with that. My interest with Hatt's cave was more concerning the geology of the area and one thing in particular that stuck out.

    About 50 feet down canyon and on the same side of the canyon as Hatt's cave was a rock landmark with a hole in it.
    A drawing on a piece of paper of that rock with the hole was attributed to Rhiney Petrasch allegedly he got it from Waltz as a clue to his mine or cache.
    This paper drawing appeared in a couple Dutchman books, I believe it might have been in Helen Corbin's Curse of the Dutchman's Gold.
    I am not sure about the origin of the drawing but Al Reser knew of the drawing from his earliest days of hunting the mine and he had a copy of it in his files.

    Here is Al's copy and a photo of the rock next to Hatt's cave.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Waltz drawing Petrasch.jpg 
Views:	176 
Size:	11.4 KB 
ID:	1672111 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Hatts Cave Rock.jpg 
Views:	205 
Size:	53.5 KB 
ID:	1672112

    Hatt's cave did fit Waltz's description of his, "two room house under a shelving rock" as told to Holmes on his deathbed. Clay Worst uses that term to describe Waltz's house in his Dutchman lectures at the SMHS Museum each year.

    Best,

    Matthew
    Interesting,
    coazon de oro likes this.

  12. #12

    Dec 2005
    Arizona
    7,749
    5323 times
    Another interesting fact is that the Pit Mine was sealed as Waltz is said to have told Holmes. I don't know if it was sealed exactly as Holmes described it, but it was sealed. Have to ask the guys who opened it up.

    Good luck,

    Joe Ribaudo
    Oroblanco likes this.
    " Hell, I was there!" Elmer Keith
    "There is an ancient proverb that says a man can never forgive you for a wrong he has done you." From a wise friend.

  13. #13
    us
    Nov 2011
    Jamestown ND
    Garrett 2500
    1,558
    1260 times
    Old Jesuits and Spainish Mines
    CactusJumper

    You seem to assume Holmes
    was part of the Story, He wasn't, he attached Himself to the story. As others have to this day.
    If he was he and Julia would have went on the Quest. What's a few pounds of ore under a bed, Then a million pounds in a mine. Let's see, You put a shotgun in my face, Then we become best of bud's in the end. 100 percent not probable, O truth.

    Babymick1

  14. #14

    Dec 2005
    Arizona
    7,749
    5323 times
    Quote Originally Posted by wrmickel1 View Post
    CactusJumper

    You seem to assume Holmes
    was part of the Story, He wasn't, he attached Himself to the story. As others have to this day.
    If he was he and Julia would have went on the Quest. What's a few pounds of ore under a bed, Then a million pounds in a mine. Let's see, You put a shotgun in my face, Then we become best of bud's in the end. 100 percent not probable, O truth.

    Babymick1
    BM,

    Actually, I never put any stock in the Holmes story at all. What happened was, the man who showed the folks who opened the Pit Mine back up its location, told me it was sealed, which conformed to the Holmes story. I fully trusted that man's word. Like many things LDM, it's a gray area.

    Good luck,

    Joe
    wrmickel1 and Oroblanco like this.
    " Hell, I was there!" Elmer Keith
    "There is an ancient proverb that says a man can never forgive you for a wrong he has done you." From a wise friend.

  15. #15
    us
    Chuck Chatsko

    Jun 2012
    HOUSTON
    Garrett pro-something
    379
    420 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    That drawing looks like a match to me. And German coins found too! Wooee!
    Ecclesiastes 1:18 For in much wisdom is much grief: and he that increaseth knowledge increaseth sorrow.

 

 
Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. The Cave
    By NJKLAGT in forum Bottles & Glass
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: Nov 21, 2016, 07:04 AM
  2. Little Cave
    By DanielFrew in forum Arkansas
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: Jun 06, 2015, 11:55 PM
  3. What does your Man Cave (or Woman Cave) look like?
    By rock in forum North American Indian Artifacts
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: Nov 28, 2012, 07:25 PM
  4. Erpfingen, Germany Karls Cave & Bear Cave
    By airborne1092 in forum Spelunking / Caves
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: May 30, 2010, 05:43 AM
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.3.0