Superstition Toponymy with Prof. Aubrey Drury
Welcome guest, is this your first visit?
Member
Discoveries
 
Page 1 of 8 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 112
Like Tree199Likes

Thread: Superstition Toponymy with Prof. Aubrey Drury

« Prev Thread | Next Thread »
  1. #1
    us
    Sep 2010
    2,397
    2245 times

    Superstition Toponymy with Prof. Aubrey Drury

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Aubrey Drury.jpg 
Views:	54 
Size:	231.1 KB 
ID:	1722808

    Profosor Aubrey Drury [1891-1959]
    http://digitalassets.lib.berkeley.ed...ftiana_024.pdf

    This thread is a look at the many geographical features in the Superstitions that were recorded in 1917 by Prof. Drury for the Southern Pacific Railroad, Co.
    For Superstition history lovers, Drury's work is essential.

    For local treasure hunters, Drury's work will help to contextualize the tales you've been reading.
    Last edited by Hal Croves; Jun 14, 2019 at 09:49 AM.

  2. #2
    us
    j

    Dec 2012
    wisconsin
    whites mxt
    200
    317 times
    Prospecting
    hello. please tell us more. I know he is responsible for naming some features such as victorio peak and horse mesa , I think he worked on mapping and naming features , tried naming fish creek canyon barronco. it seems he liked to use Spanish names. Or I am totally wrong. lol. but I would like to hear more . thanks
    Hal Croves and Real of Tayopa like this.

  3. #3
    us
    Sep 2010
    2,397
    2245 times
    Quote Originally Posted by dredgernaut View Post
    hello. please tell us more. I know he is responsible for naming some features such as victorio peak and horse mesa , I think he worked on mapping and naming features , tried naming fish creek canyon barronco. it seems he liked to use Spanish names. Or I am totally wrong. lol. but I would like to hear more . thanks
    Prof. Drury was a details man, focused on the preservation of history but his work for the Southern Pacific R.R. isn't perfect. He sometimes assigned arbitrary titles to geographical features with no identifiable name.

    Victoria Peak (your Victorio Peak?) I think may be one example. Unless there are two Peaks Victoria/Victorio(?)

    "Several geographic names, including Victorio Peak, were submitted by Professor Aubrey Drury on behalf of the Southern Pacific Railroad for unnamed features along the Apache Trail. Many of these names were approved by the USBGN on 07 November 1917, and on 01 February 1933, most of the names were vacated by the Board at the request of the U.S. Forest Service. The name Victorio Peak was one of these names, and the decision was vacated based on the Forest Service recommendation that the feature name should not be shown on maps because it was difficult to locate and Chief Victorio had no direct association to the specific feature. The spelling variation of Victoria Peak has likely evolved over the years due to local use and map editor's interpretation. The name was recommended in 1917 by Professor Drury for Victorio, a noted chief of the Warm Springs Tribe of the Apache Indians. Victorio did not travel this far west but is closely identified with the Apache Indian Wars."

    Geranimo Head, the mountain, is also interesting because Prof. Drury never actually recorded that name. He used "Geronimo Head" to describe the "Mountain Profile" (USGS), the stone-head formation found"On the mountain to the south of Tortilla Flat station is the remarkable profile of an indian chief, quite appropriately called "Geronimo Head".

    "Quite appropriately" means that the name, at least locally, was in use before Prof. Drury's work in 1917. Geronimo passed in 1909, which is eight potential years of use, in memorial. Miners, ranchers, cowboys, Natives Americans, locals named the stone-head formation, not Prof. Drury. The site was already culturally important.

    Just how important is the question.

    The USGS ultimately redefined Geronimo Head to mean "Summit", Geronimo Head Mountain, and Prof. Drury's Geronimo Head the Mountain Profile was all but forgotten.
    Last edited by Hal Croves; Jun 14, 2019 at 04:38 PM.

  4. #4
    us
    Sep 2010
    2,397
    2245 times
    Attachment 1722884
    Geronimo
    E. A. Burbank. 1897


    Its unclear who named this particular Mountain Profile, but Prof. Drury agreed with their decision to use Geronimo Head.

    Read about Wells Drury (father) here:
    https://nevadapress.com/about-us/hall-of-fame/wells-drury/
    https://ch.ucpress.edu/content/11/2/190


    Read about Prof. Drury's brother Newton here:
    https://www.nytimes.com/1978/12/16/archives/newton-drury-conservationist-who-led-redwood-drive-dies-park-named.html


    Last edited by Hal Croves; Jun 14, 2019 at 06:34 PM.

  5. #5
    us
    Sep 2010
    2,397
    2245 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Hal Croves View Post
    Attachment 1722884
    Geronimo
    E. A. Burbank. 1897


    Its unclear who named this particular Mountain Profile, but Prof. Drury agreed with their decision to use Geronimo Head.

    Read about Wells Drury (father) here:
    https://nevadapress.com/about-us/hall-of-fame/wells-drury/
    https://ch.ucpress.edu/content/11/2/190


    Read about Prof. Drury's brother Newton here:
    https://www.nytimes.com/1978/12/16/archives/newton-drury-conservationist-who-led-redwood-drive-dies-park-named.html


    I am unable to share a photograph of Prof. Drury's Geronimo Head (the Mountain Profile), but enclosed is an exact tracing of it in profile. This I believe is the same Mountain Profile that Ron describes seeing with Tom K. Here, side-by-side are the images for comparison.

    Anyone been to the site and can point-point the location? Anyone have photos to share?

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Geronimo Heads.jpg 
Views:	53 
Size:	366.9 KB 
ID:	1723024

  6. #6
    us
    j

    Dec 2012
    wisconsin
    whites mxt
    200
    317 times
    Prospecting
    sorry, not sure where rons is, but there is lots of head shaped structures out there. Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20190211_122429.jpg 
Views:	51 
Size:	3.89 MB 
ID:	1723044Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20190212_121959.jpg 
Views:	41 
Size:	2.53 MB 
ID:	1723045 . sorry if I am going off topic.

  7. #7
    us
    Sep 2010
    2,397
    2245 times
    Quote Originally Posted by dredgernaut View Post
    sorry, not sure where rons is, but there is lots of head shaped structures out there. Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20190211_122429.jpg 
Views:	51 
Size:	3.89 MB 
ID:	1723044Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20190212_121959.jpg 
Views:	41 
Size:	2.53 MB 
ID:	1723045 . sorry if I am going off topic.
    I agree that there are "lots" of head shaped structures in the range.
    Naturally occurring structures.
    Structures that, based on lighting and viewer position, resemble a human face or head.

    "Pareidolia is a phenomenon in which the mind responds to a stimulus (for example an image) and perceives a pattern (for example a face) where none exists."

    I asked if anyone could identify a face/head-like structures with a known name, issued by the USGS.
    Only one was offered in the Superstitions.

    The Geronimo Head Mountain Profile (USGS), named by locals before 1916.
    "on the mountain to the south of Tortilla Flat Station..."
    The same one (I believe) that impressed Ron & Tom.

    There are "lots" of examples as you noted but only one with a USGS assigned name.
    Last edited by Hal Croves; Jun 17, 2019 at 02:45 PM.

  8. #8
    us
    Sep 2010
    2,397
    2245 times
    Taken from somehiker's list.

    13) Theres a spirit that sleeps near the mine 4 hours a day. (Apache Jack)
    43) All the old landmarks are still there. You can almost peek into the mine where the entrance has settled. The cave of hidden gold. (San Carlos Apaches 1965)
    55) Near the mine is a face that looks right at the mine. (Storm)
    56) A Sphinx overhangs and dominates the mine area. (John Reed)
    57) Waltz told of a natural stone face sitting upon the end of a canyon below his mine. (Storm)


  9. #9
    us
    Sep 2010
    2,397
    2245 times
    Prof. Drury's work for the Southern Pacific R.R., along the Apache Trail, is explained in this article written by Tom Kollenborn.
    Sunset Route and Apache Trail
    1915 Auto Tours - Sunset Route LTD


    "The Apache Trail Auto Line served as an extra added adventure for those who wanted to take a motorcar trip from the Bowie/Globe station to Chandler or Phoenix via the Apache Trail."

    Tom's article is sobering for anyone overly mystified by the geography of the Superstitions.
    The Apache Trail is more accurately described as the "Roosevelt to Mesa Road".
    Most sites and their names along the Apache Trail were assigned names by Prof. Drury...
    an advertising man.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Apache Trail.jpg 
Views:	76 
Size:	100.0 KB 
ID:	1724104
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Cover.jpg 
Views:	38 
Size:	119.7 KB 
ID:	1724106
    Last edited by Hal Croves; Jun 18, 2019 at 09:08 AM.
    dredgernaut and coazon de oro like this.

  10. #10
    us
    Sep 2010
    2,397
    2245 times
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Superstitions.jpg 
Views:	46 
Size:	133.5 KB 
ID:	1724130

    1916 Apache Trail view of the Superstition Mountains.
    A favorite photograph.

    What year was the tale of Jacob Waltz's Gold first made public?
    coazon de oro, deducer and txtea like this.

  11. #11
    ca
    May 2007
    3,880
    5207 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Arizona Weekly Gazette
    September 1/1892
    “A Queer Quest, Another Lost Mine Being Hunted by a Woman.”
    Hell,you ain't never too old to look!

  12. #12
    ca
    May 2007
    3,880
    5207 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Quote Originally Posted by Hal Croves View Post
    Taken from somehiker's list.

    13) Theres a spirit that sleeps near the mine 4 hours a day. (Apache Jack)
    43) All the old landmarks are still there. You can almost peek into the mine where the entrance has settled. The cave of hidden gold. (San Carlos Apaches 1965)
    55) Near the mine is a face that looks right at the mine. (Storm)
    56) A Sphinx overhangs and dominates the mine area. (John Reed)
    57) Waltz told of a natural stone face sitting upon the end of a canyon below his mine. (Storm)

    The Apache believed there were spirits in the world they roamed. The were collectively known as Ga'an(s), who lived in mountains, caves, rivers and lakes and so forth.
    It was they who were responsible for all of the everyday occurrences which were outside of man's control....what we would call nature or natural....especially things of a spiritual nature. They had the power that controlled both the people and the animals, good luck and bad luck, as well as those forces of nature like thunder and lightning, hail and rain etc. Usen was the only God they believed in, as both the creator and guarantor of continued life.

    13) So it sounds like Apache Jack was referring to one of the Ga'ans. Question is which one ? And why would such a spirit sleep for four hours each day.
    Was there something close to the mine which resembled a likeness of a Ga'an dancer that they recognized ?

    43) All or most of the old landmarks should remain to this day as well then, since there has been no significant change to the terrain out there since the Great Bavispe Earthquake of May 3,1887. Other Than Celeste Jones blasting off the top of Weavers Needle,that is. But is it a mine or a cave ? Who knows....maybe both ? A mine somewhere down in a cave ?

    55) A "face" that looks at the mine.
    Which is something this shot brought to mind.....for me anyway......
    I had wondered why my Priest didn't have the hat. Thought maybe it had broken up and fallen down below, since there was a big pile of broken rock at the base. But I also wondered what he might be pointing to with that big cross.....turned out....this....
    That looks like a face at the bottom of the shot.... is it that face he was talking about ?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Priest hat and face.jpg 
Views:	52 
Size:	84.2 KB 
ID:	1724415  
    Last edited by somehiker; Jun 19, 2019 at 03:54 AM.
    Hal Croves and weekender like this.
    Hell,you ain't never too old to look!

  13. #13
    ca
    May 2007
    3,880
    5207 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    56) A "sphinx" ?
    Got one of those as well. About as close to one as anyone is gonna get IMHO.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	100_0536 sphinx  face up.jpg 
Views:	32 
Size:	574.3 KB 
ID:	1724416  
    Hal Croves and txtea like this.
    Hell,you ain't never too old to look!

  14. #14

    Jun 2019
    24
    8 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Well in that case on foot maybe. Rough country.

  15. #15

    Jun 2019
    24
    8 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    If you did see something then walk in the line you see it best in and you may see another sign. I've seen them carve hard rock into sandstone archways as a sign. Anything that catches your eye. Even a feeling can lead you to it.
    Last edited by Super Dog; Jun 19, 2019 at 03:54 AM.

 

 
Page 1 of 8 123 ... LastLast

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. WAR STORIES: The Battle of Drury's Bluff
    By jeff of pa in forum Civil War
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: Sep 12, 2018, 06:59 PM
  2. PROF.ELMERS
    By HAPPYCAMPER in forum Bottles & Glass
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: Aug 23, 2015, 08:09 PM
  3. The Profs Big Day
    By wilkere in forum Today's Finds!
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Oct 03, 2009, 07:14 AM
  4. Queen of the Missouri — the Francis X. Aubrey
    By Gypsy Heart in forum Treasure Legends
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: Aug 25, 2008, 01:29 AM
  5. Uncle Drury James La Panza ranch
    By La Panza kid in forum Treasure Leads
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: Feb 03, 2007, 02:33 PM

Tags for this Thread

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.3.0