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Thread: Bedrock and Gold: The mysteries . . .

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  1. #2536
    Charter Member

    Apr 2003
    Alberta
    Various Minelabs(5000, 2100, X-Terra 705), Falcon MD20, Tesoro Sand Shark, Gold Bug Pro, Makro Gold Racer.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Johnnybravo300 View Post
    Great posts and stories! I never get tired of this stuff man.
    Thanks for dropping in and taking the time to say so! I appreciate it.

    All the best,

    Lanny
    Nothin' quite as fun as chasin' nugget gold! http://www.treasurenet.com/forums/me...mysteries.html

  2. #2537
    ca
    Oct 2011
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    545 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Moved..
    Last edited by Cariboo5; Jan 26, 2018 at 11:24 AM. Reason: moved

  3. #2538
    Charter Member

    Apr 2003
    Alberta
    Various Minelabs(5000, 2100, X-Terra 705), Falcon MD20, Tesoro Sand Shark, Gold Bug Pro, Makro Gold Racer.
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    Sorry this took so long, but this winter has been insane.

    360 degrees of gold.

    It was the summer of burning—over three million acres of trees turned into smoke and ash.

    Some days the ash swirled from the smoke to land in weightless gray and black powders on me as I was detecting; other days, no ash fell but the thick smoke was a sick yellow and orange, transformed by a shy yet feverish sun.

    But, always the smoke . . .

    That truly was last summer, the summer of endless fires, the summer when the cobalt blue sky became a fugitive, the summer when the visibility was measured in fractions of a mile instead of immeasurable miles, the summer when the rain renounced its friendship with the forest, the summer when the world was on fire.

    Mother Nature was angry, and when Mother Nature is intent on destruction, there’s little man can do—just ask my friends in California.

    Everyone knew we’d be evacuated, but no one knew when. The winds were the summer fates, the tellers and takers of fortunes, and when at last they drove the fires in a fixed direction, the call came for immediate and mandatory evacuation: the mining world stopped.

    Now, I don’t want you to think that I didn’t have any fun. There were days when the smoke was less intense, and on those days I hit the bedrock of the ancient channel, bedrock that once held the insane weight of the prehistoric monsters of old as they wandered through the valley long before the glaciers did their chaotic works of mass excavation and deposition.

    Looking at the bank above the exposed bedrock, I could clearly see where the glacial rocks rested on top of the bed of the protected ancient channel; those glacial stones have shoulders, unlike the smooth finish of rounded river-run. Glacial rock remains roughly hewn, always in an unfinished state, stone forever marked by those easy to identify shoulders or angles.

    The pay channel underneath the deep glacial deposit was about six feet thick, and the placer miners that had left the abandoned workings had gone right to bedrock, and in some places, they’d taken several feet of the bedrock as well. Some of the bedrock was a bull quartz, super hard, and some was soft decomposed material and had been easily cut by the Old-timers.

    I was lucky to find a spot where the bedrock had dropped down in a series of dips, and the clay from the glacial mess above hadn’t worked its way down into those dips. I found a place where the soft bedrock met the hard, always a good place to check, and I broke out the detector and my store of digging tools.

    The spot I chose was a flatter portion of harder rock about the size of a larger bedroom mattress, bordered on one side by the softer bedrock already mentioned, and on the other side it was bordered by a zone of friable rock. I ground-balanced the detector on a quiet area, walked roughly to the middle of the harder rock where the whole section sort of crowned, and I started to swing the coil. Immediately I heard multiple hits as the coil passed back and forth. Well, this happens a lot when there are bits of steel from blade, bucket, and track, trash left from earlier placer mining, so I grabbed my telescoping magnetic wand and scrubbed the rock to get rid of the ferrous targets.

    Indeed, there were bits of steel on the super-magnet, but not many, and they were tiny. That was surprising. So, I swung the coil back and forth again, multiple hits were transmitted through the headphones yet again. A bit puzzled, I checked my coil wire coming off the box to see if it was tight, checked the coil wire on the shaft for any loose portions above the coil to cause falsing, but everything was good.

    I went back to swinging the coil, and back to multiple targets. Now, at that point, my heart-rate increased, but I’ve been at this nugget-shooting long enough not to make assumptions, so I started scraping into the small pockets of trapped ancient pay in that old bedrock, dragging out the contents as I worked to then scan the areas again. No signals from pockets, but there were targets in the dirt I'd removed. I ran the super-magnet wand through the dirt, no friends. Swinging the coil while listening through the headphones, I worked the dirt to put only signals in the scoop, then passed the scoop over the coil. Targets in the scoop, non-magnetic targets for sure.

    I’ll break the story here a bit, for if you’ve swung a coil long enough, you’ll hit bits of copper, lead, aluminum, hot rocks, or even hot bedrock that sounds sweet, so I had to stick with the sift and sort process until I could work down the material in the scoop until I could drop the remnants onto the coil. There they were, three nuggets! What the heck? Nothing under a gram, nothing over two grams, but nuggets.

    I went back to the spot and swung the coil, detected over the cleaned spot, no signal. I swept to the left, multiple targets, to the right, multiple targets. Was there something crazy about this bedrock? I used the super-magnet to hopefully eliminate bad targets, still multiple targets under the coil. I thought, “Something’s not right”, so I slowly swung the coil in a circle around me, to see if the detector was in some kind of looney falsing phase, but only target, target, target. I mean, you can’t make this stuff up, yet I couldn’t believe they could all be good targets, so I used the wand on the new areas I’d swept around, and sure enough, some ferrous, but when I swept again, still good signals, and the meter was pinning on gold!

    What a haul that day from the hard bedrock!! (Another detector paid off.) And, yes, there were a few nuggets where the other rocks abutted the hard bedrock, but most of the gold, and it was one sweet day let me tell you, most of the gold was on that hard bedrock tight in little pockets of ancient run, with a few nuggets down in crevices, and a few bigger ones deeper down that I had to chisel out. But that bedrock was so hard, I’m thinking whatever they were using to excavate that ancient placer run just skipped over the bedrock to leave those little deposits of placer intact.

    Nothing over three grams, yet some under a gram, but so stinkin' much fun digging so many targets from so many spots.

    360 degrees of gold.

    When does that happen? Perhaps only on a smoky day when the world's on fire.

    All the best,

    Lanny
    Beav, arizau, 63bkpkr and 7 others like this.
    Nothin' quite as fun as chasin' nugget gold! http://www.treasurenet.com/forums/me...mysteries.html

  4. #2539
    us
    Northern California

    Aug 2007
    Southern California
    XLT, GMT, 6000D Coinmaster
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    Hi Lanny, wonderful reading once again! Thank you for taking the time to share some of what you were up to this past summer.

    I was out for a month late in the year searching for a spot I'd come across many years ago I did not find it on the ground though I did find it just recently in one picture I took. I compared the ~ 2008 photograph of the Quartz Vein to my 2017 pictures and when I paid attention to the mountains far in the background I realized there were clues there about where I was at in 2008. Turns out that one 2017 picture showed a section of the vein though I did not notice it when I was actually out there. So I've a project for 2018! Enjoy your time off and the mountains when you get back out................63bkpkr
    Out searching w/GMT & friend under my arm

  5. #2540
    Charter Member

    Apr 2003
    Alberta
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    As you can tell, I'm back to writing again for a bit.

    The Rookie That Got Some

    Well, last summer was the summer of fire, the unhindered dramatic display of nature’s wrath and fury; however, it was also a summer that produced good gold.

    My son that lives in the Southern United States decided he’d use some of his holidays to come visit the goldfields. Now, he’s never been what you’d call a goldminer that’s super fired up about mining. I mean, when he was little, I took him with me on various expeditions, but he just never caught the bug like my older son. Now, my older son, he’s got a wonderful case of the fever . . .

    So, when my southern son hit camp, it was hot, and most of the smoke from the fires had drifted off to the east and north that day, with the heat really getting through because of that, enough heat to make it stinking hot! Furthermore, if you add to the heat the idea of dropping into a canyon with old workings where the sun beats down and is reflected several times from wall of rock to wall of rock, and then picture the sun reflected back up from the bare bedrock beneath, it’s nature’s clever way to cook you.

    As we packed up before leaving camp, we made sure we had hats to protect us from the sun, white long-sleeved shirts, lots of water to drink as dehydration is always a concern in the summer mountains, and sunscreen for my son as he’s a walking ad for why that stuff is necessary. If he even thinks about being in direct sunlight for very long, his light skin starts to turn red. Me, I just turn brown, then browner.

    We got to the rim of the canyon and hit an old road where we were able to work our way down to the canyon bottom to get to the abandoned placer workings. There was evidence on one of the berms of twisted old mine rails from a drift mine, rails that were obviously yanked out when the miners had hit old tunnels while excavating the bedrock.

    In the bottom of the pit were seven large boulders, the largest being about the sized of several fridges roped together, and it was tilted at a crazy angle. There were a series of rolling dips where the softer bedrock had allowed the miners to cut into it, and some of those dips had water standing in them, with a large pool of water off to the right of the biggest boulder, with water bordering a cut that ran along the edge of the ancient placer channel, with a portion of the channel clearly visible under about fifty feet of overburden.

    Now, my boy had never truly detected for gold before. I mean, he’d done a tiny bit of snooping around with a machine just listening to signals back at camp to know what a positive response was versus a response that would only waste his time, but that was about it.

    In that pit, there was some mean bedrock. Mean in that it was hot. Hot in that it had stringers and bundles of iron pyrite that drove VLF’s crazy as any VLF had thought they’d hit the mother lode over and over again! But of course, it was only pyrite, but try telling that to a VLF when its all juiced up thinking it’s finally found something. (It had fooled me in the past, driving me to cut holes with hammer and chisel to see what was sending such a nice signal.) So, this was a rather tough schoolhouse to put him into for training, but I wanted to see what he could do in challenging conditions.

    I walked him back through the strengths and weaknesses of the Bug Pro, told him how to watch the display (especially to watch for the sweet zone on the meter), reviewed how important it was to swing the coil properly, how to overlap his sweeps, how to reorient ninety-degrees to the original signal response, how to use the magnetic wand to quickly remove ferrous signals close to the surface, how to use the proper tools (chisels, hammer, bars, picks) to dig to recover a target, how to use the scoop to sift and sort [what I call reduction], how to use the coil to drop the last bit of dirt from the scoop onto it to make the final ID of any metal target, how to always investigate anything that in any way broke the threshold, etc.

    He’d only made a few sweeps when he hollered that he had a signal. I walked over to see what he had, and the meter was pinning right in the sweet zone, but it was bumping around just a bit. I listened to the signal, had him cross it with a ninety-degree sweep and the meter bumped around a bit more. Next, I watched as he dug to isolate the target, using the nose of the coil to pinpoint where in the hole the target response was the strongest. Using the small pick (I always have two sizes with me), he uncovered a ledge of harder bedrock, and the detector was singing a sweet song. He worked out a piece of the bedrock with some surrounding material, threw it in the scoop, sifted and sorted while passing the scoop under the coil until he was certain the target was still in the scoop, then shook the remaining material on his coil. Whap!

    Well, it was a good tone, an interesting signal that was in the right area on the meter, but the target was definitely a stringer of pyrite, and I believe it was arsenopyrite, at least that’s what a geologist told me one day when he was strolling through the pit doing a bedrock assessment on another day earlier in the spring. So, I reviewed a few things with him, ran the coil over the pyrite so he could watch the meter carefully, altered the path of the sweep so he could see how the meter jumped a bit more, and then I sent him off to have at it once more.

    Soon, he hit another signal, checked the meter, dug the target, went through the reduction process, and he’d liberated another piece of pyrite. He kept at it for two hours, pyrite, pyrite, pyrite, but he kept at it, and I noticed that in some spots he slowed down and scrubbed the coil over the bedrock then used the pick on the spot and scrubbed again. Obviously he’d hit a faint signal or a whisper and was trying to get a tone.

    At the end of the two hours, we took a break, and we found the only shade there was, on the side of that big boulder. We hydrated while we rested, broke out some high energy snacks and just geared down while we took a brain and heat break. Now, taking a brain break is critical, but lots of nugget-shooters ignore this as they’re out to cover as much ground as possible, but I’ve found that without the breaks, the brain, the body, the whole human system dulls down, and that’s not good when most of the nuggets to be found on the first pass aren’t screamers but only threshold breakers. Moreover, it doesn’t matter how many times I review this with rookies when I’m putting them in a sweet spot where I KNOW there are nuggets as far too many are only in a hurry to hear a signal that smacks them up the side of the head and says, “Dig me!”. So, they burn through the ground and get nothing but bits of steel. However, every once in a while you get a rookie that really takes the advice to heart, and those are the ones that find the gold. Now, I’ve written a story or two about this phenomenon in the past, and it’s always amazing to see the long face on the pit-burner versus the face of the happy rookie that slowed down and checked out every threshold break and therefore got the gold!

    However, once again, I’m off track with my story. So, back to it . . . We finished resting our brains and reenergizing our bodies, and then I walked my son over to the other side of the pool of water I mentioned earlier in the story. The ground here was different. There were still rolling drops in the bedrock, but there was more clay material stuck in the cracks and crevices, and the composition of the bedrock went through several transition zones with hard bedrock meeting softer bedrock, and there were some zones of bull quartz as well. (Bull quartz? All I know is the same geologist pointed it out to me, a different color cast from the other bedrock [sometimes a brownish-pinkish look and super hard stuff for sure, but great for having lots of little dips, cracks, and crevices, but crazy rock to try to work with a pick and tough sledding indeed when it comes to hammer and chisel work.) But what I wanted him to notice were the variety of transition zones in the bedrock that were missing from the other side he’d worked for two hours. That other side was mostly uniform bedrock that the miners had been able to rip into quite easily, with only a few areas where the bedrock resisted their efforts, but on the new side, there were at least three contact zones of differing bedrock: friable slate? (I’m no geologist), bull quartz, and a gray zone of softer rock that held the pyrite stringers. Mother Nature sure had enjoyed herself when she bedded that bedrock!

    So, having dispensed words of practical advice, I set him loose on the new ground. Shortly thereafter, he called to come look and listen. This time the meter was pinning and not bumping at all. Indeed, he had a nugget after he’d gone through the reduction process! A little over a gram (when we weighed it later in the evening), but a nice nugget for a rookie. However, better than the find was the look on his face, a look somewhere between wonder and satisfaction. I mean, after two hours of BBQ conditions and no gold whatsoever, he finally had a nugget.

    Well, he kept at it, and the hits just kept coming. (I know, corny musical analogy, allusion, cliché or whatever it is.) Nugget after nugget until he had a nice collection in his palm at the end of the next two productive hours, a nice variety of various sizes of chunks of gold with one that was quite unique.

    He called me over as he had a signal that was clearly audible, but he couldn’t find it. He used the pick in the bull quartz to chip away at the surface, used a pry-bar to see if he could find any loose spots indicating a crevice, but there didn’t seem to be any obvious avenue to the gold, yet the signal was nice and crisp, so whatever it was, it was down in that hard bedrock.

    I gave him the small hand-sledge, a chisel, the Garret Carrot for pinpointing, and I told him to carefully work his way down into the mother rock. It took him a while, but then he gave a yell for me to come see. At about five-inches down, he’d broken out a piece of hard bedrock, and there trapped in the jaws of the bull quartz, jaws that had last snapped shut when the dinosaurs played in that ancient streambed, was a gorgeous nugget, rectangular in shape and definitely held fast. After a few more lessons on how to safely liberate a nugget so imprisoned, he held it in his hand. It was rectangular indeed (significantly longer than wide) with a small hole through one place where it looked like some quartz had been eroded while Mother Nature’s hydraulic hammer-mill, her preferred process for moving stream gold. It was over a half-inch in length and had some thickness to it, certainly a beautiful piece.

    There were other nuggets found that day, a few along the borders of the pool of water where there were more contact zones, but his haul was the biggest of the day by far. However, my best haul was the satisfaction that I’d finally passed the fever on to my younger son, the golden gift that keeps on motivating.

    And yes, he’s ready to come back this season to try his luck again.

    All the best,

    Lanny
    Nothin' quite as fun as chasin' nugget gold! http://www.treasurenet.com/forums/me...mysteries.html

  6. #2541
    Charter Member
    us
    Make America Great Again!

    May 2010
    White Plains, New York
    Tesoro Cult Member - Mojave; ; Lobo Super Traq; - Minelab GPZ 7000; Equinox 600
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    Great stories Lanny! You need to put a book together of these stories so I an buy an autographed copy!!!!

  7. #2542
    us
    May 2014
    AZ
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    Great story as usual.

    PS: I'm open for adoption.
    Last edited by arizau; Feb 13, 2018 at 01:14 PM.
    If it can't be grown, it must be mined!

  8. #2543
    us
    Dennis

    Jan 2012
    Montana
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    Thanks for the inspiration! But just have to wait for all this unforgiving snow to disappear.
    Lanny in AB likes this.

  9. #2544
    Charter Member

    Apr 2003
    Alberta
    Various Minelabs(5000, 2100, X-Terra 705), Falcon MD20, Tesoro Sand Shark, Gold Bug Pro, Makro Gold Racer.
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    Quote Originally Posted by 63bkpkr View Post
    Hi Lanny, wonderful reading once again! Thank you for taking the time to share some of what you were up to this past summer.

    I was out for a month late in the year searching for a spot I'd come across many years ago I did not find it on the ground though I did find it just recently in one picture I took. I compared the ~ 2008 photograph of the Quartz Vein to my 2017 pictures and when I paid attention to the mountains far in the background I realized there were clues there about where I was at in 2008. Turns out that one 2017 picture showed a section of the vein though I did not notice it when I was actually out there. So I've a project for 2018! Enjoy your time off and the mountains when you get back out................63bkpkr
    Hi Herb,

    I'm glad you had a chance to visit those mountains that have such a hold on your heart. In addition, I'm glad you've figured out where to go back to in your hunt to find your special spot and hopefully some nice gold as well.

    All the best, and as always, great to hear from you again,

    Lanny
    63bkpkr likes this.
    Nothin' quite as fun as chasin' nugget gold! http://www.treasurenet.com/forums/me...mysteries.html

  10. #2545
    Charter Member

    Apr 2003
    Alberta
    Various Minelabs(5000, 2100, X-Terra 705), Falcon MD20, Tesoro Sand Shark, Gold Bug Pro, Makro Gold Racer.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terry Soloman View Post
    Great stories Lanny! You need to put a book together of these stories so I an buy an autographed copy!!!!
    Thanks for your kind words and support Terry, much appreciated.

    All the best,

    Lanny
    Terry Soloman likes this.
    Nothin' quite as fun as chasin' nugget gold! http://www.treasurenet.com/forums/me...mysteries.html

  11. #2546
    Charter Member

    Apr 2003
    Alberta
    Various Minelabs(5000, 2100, X-Terra 705), Falcon MD20, Tesoro Sand Shark, Gold Bug Pro, Makro Gold Racer.
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    Quote Originally Posted by arizau View Post
    Great story as usual.

    PS: I'm open for adoption.
    Great to hear from you, and as for the adoption, I'll keep you in mind.

    All the best,

    Lanny
    63bkpkr and arizau like this.
    Nothin' quite as fun as chasin' nugget gold! http://www.treasurenet.com/forums/me...mysteries.html

  12. #2547
    Charter Member

    Apr 2003
    Alberta
    Various Minelabs(5000, 2100, X-Terra 705), Falcon MD20, Tesoro Sand Shark, Gold Bug Pro, Makro Gold Racer.
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    Quote Originally Posted by old digger View Post
    Thanks for the inspiration! But just have to wait for all this unforgiving snow to disappear.
    Thanks for dropping in, and I'm with you on this winter's snow; I just want it to go away!!

    We had the wrong kind of climate change this winter, back to snow, ice and cold, not the climate change I wanted that's for sure.

    All the best,

    Lanny
    old digger likes this.
    Nothin' quite as fun as chasin' nugget gold! http://www.treasurenet.com/forums/me...mysteries.html

  13. #2548
    us
    Northern California

    Aug 2007
    Southern California
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    Nice time out with your son, how wonderful the fever has been passed on to him and of course wonderful "Lanny" writing! Noticing clues is so ever important, I suspect when I was out last year the warmth but mostly the hard work of clearing a trail had gotten to me so I missed going over and looking at what a vaguely recall having seen when I was there. Of course, thank goodness for having taken a picture while there which allowed me to notice the clues later on.

    And yes I will be back out there this year IF I'm not in India teaching engineers all about extruding tubing, which might happen. IF I am chosen for the India position at some point I will try to find a mountain stream to play around in, assuming that is allowed. If I am still in the U.S.A. then I will be all over hill and dale just enjoying being out there and as early in the year as possible. 'Right now' the Sierra Nevada mountains do not have that much snow in them, actually I'm hoping there will be more as the State needs the water. Ma Nature makes the choices on this!

    Both of us need to do the important things this winter, me I'm traveling to Idaho this week to attend a Wedding but no, not my own. Then I will take care of the rest of what I need to do so as to be prepared for whatever comes my way. Take Care Lanny..............Herb
    Lanny in AB likes this.
    Out searching w/GMT & friend under my arm

  14. #2549
    Charter Member

    Apr 2003
    Alberta
    Various Minelabs(5000, 2100, X-Terra 705), Falcon MD20, Tesoro Sand Shark, Gold Bug Pro, Makro Gold Racer.
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    Quote Originally Posted by 63bkpkr View Post
    Nice time out with your son, how wonderful the fever has been passed on to him and of course wonderful "Lanny" writing! Noticing clues is so ever important, I suspect when I was out last year the warmth but mostly the hard work of clearing a trail had gotten to me so I missed going over and looking at what a vaguely recall having seen when I was there. Of course, thank goodness for having taken a picture while there which allowed me to notice the clues later on.

    And yes I will be back out there this year IF I'm not in India teaching engineers all about extruding tubing, which might happen. IF I am chosen for the India position at some point I will try to find a mountain stream to play around in, assuming that is allowed. If I am still in the U.S.A. then I will be all over hill and dale just enjoying being out there and as early in the year as possible. 'Right now' the Sierra Nevada mountains do not have that much snow in them, actually I'm hoping there will be more as the State needs the water. Ma Nature makes the choices on this!

    Both of us need to do the important things this winter, me I'm traveling to Idaho this week to attend a Wedding but no, not my own. Then I will take care of the rest of what I need to do so as to be prepared for whatever comes my way. Take Care Lanny..............Herb
    Hi Herb,

    Clearing trail is a zero on the fun scale! That would desensitize me to missing some things while out prospecting for sure.

    I'm glad to hear that you've still got the urge to chase the gold, and to spend time in the wilderness as spending time in the wilderness for me is sometimes better for charging the human batteries than anything else I've ever tried. So, I hope you get a chance to chase the gold wherever you wind up.

    On a related note, I've got a mining buddy that bought a river claim. To get down to the river to work, he's had to build quite the trail on the mountainside; the trail in itself is a master work by how he found a way to cut it so that he could make it wide enough to get his ATV down and back (cribbed with logs in places, rocks in others, etc.). In addition, he's built a cable tramway to get supplies, fuel, equipment, etc. down and back from where his wash-plant is.

    Many years ago, I stumbled upon a tramway, not unlike his, in a deep, cold, deadly quiet moss-covered canyon. I had a terrible time getting into the canyon on foot, a bit of a nightmare actually, so I could see the need of the cable, but I have no idea who installed it or when, but it was still hanging, so that was something, and there was no way I was trying it.

    While in that canyon, I noticed a spot by the river on the same side of the bank, but downstream from the cable about a quarter of a mile where there was a pile of classified cobble. Mixed in with the cobble were some decayed bits of rubber, and of course, that always gets the gold radar up and running. So, I looked around to do a little detective work, and because of that, I noticed some small areas of the same classified cobble showing in little piles running up the cliffs of the mountainside! What?

    I worked my way up the canyon wall to see if I could find the source of the cobble, and I mean, it was tough sledding, lots of vertical, but I kept following the cobble until I came to a large fissure in the cliff face. In front of the fissure was another pile of cobble. I had to work around curves to get into the crack, and then it opened up. Inside the opening, I could clearly see where someone had dug a mine! There was cobble everywhere, and this was fifty feet above the stream-bed. Whoever had done the work had gone through the bedrock in that fissure and hit an ancient channel. (There was no external sign of a channel visible anywhere on that slope, only solid rock.)

    Did I mention how spooky that canyon was? Moss all over the walls, cold, supernaturally quiet (no animal sounds, birds, etc., at all), and it was dim to dark down there. The light didn't really get into that part of the canyon, no direct light anyway.

    The workings were caved, and there were bits and pieces of common items scattered around, items found around any mine. Furthermore, it looked like the workings had been deliberately closed, but there was one cool thing.

    In a recess I noticed some cement work done in a square shape, and when I worked my way over to take a look, there was a steel/iron strong box bolted to the concrete. Sadly, or naturally, it was empty, but it was very strongly built, and it had a large hasp for a lock, so someone had gone to a lot of trouble to make sure they had a safe place to store something precious.

    The records kept in that mining area are very poor to non-existent, all the way from the 1800's up through the 1930's, and those workings were old, so I'm not sure how I'd ever track down the story in full, but whoever did the excavation sure had a sure-fire plan backed by some capital, and all of it driven by lots of willpower and mind-numbing work to get everything needed up (from the river bottom) or down (from the mountain) into that mine.

    What's intriguing is that somehow they'd figured there was a bench deposit up on the side of that canyon, and they'd figured out that if they tunneled down (that tunnel went straight down!) through the solid rock on the side of the canyon that they'd be able to cut their way into it. (Never underestimate the knowledge or intuition of the old-timers.)

    Cool place to visit, but definitely one that will remain a mystery nonetheless.

    All the best,

    Lanny
    Last edited by Lanny in AB; Feb 14, 2018 at 05:38 PM.
    Nothin' quite as fun as chasin' nugget gold! http://www.treasurenet.com/forums/me...mysteries.html

  15. #2550
    us
    Bruce

    Feb 2016
    Youngstown, FL
    Fisher Gold Bug Pro, Gold Hog stream sluice
    217
    261 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Hi Lanny --

    Thanks again so much for taking the time to share your golden adventures with the rest of us! You live in such an awesome place!

    -Bruce

 

 

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