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Thread: Bedrock and Gold: The mysteries . . .

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  1. #751
    us
    Medicine/Holy Man

    May 2010
    California
    Whites MXT, Whites TDI
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    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Re: Bedrock and Gold: The mysteries . . .

    That sounds like a date. I'll be watching for the invite.

    On another note, just wondering, wouldn't it make sense to take out a portion of the
    bed rock. I would make a super "heavies" trap, and be easier to clean out the next
    time. Fill it back in with head sized boulders that new gold can work down through.

    I think the main problem with FG would be just leaving the hole open.

    Of course, it's been my experience that FG and BLM don't like to strain themselves.
    If they can't drive in, or at least ride a dirt bike in, they'll never see it.
    In any case, whatever you do, it's sure to be interesting.

    I already know that I need more veggies and fruits in my diet. As for the meat,
    It would be hard to change a lifetime of preferences at my age.

    As I say; I look 60, feel 40 and work like I'm 30. Hope I'm not heading into a
    second childhood.

  2. #752
    us
    Medicine/Holy Man

    May 2010
    California
    Whites MXT, Whites TDI
    1,857
    582 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Re: Bedrock and Gold: The mysteries . . .

    Halito Lanny,

    Hey, tell your friend that I'm impressed with the tray. I think I'll try to make one for my scales.
    Maybe that will give me the incentive to go out and find something to weigh.

    Love the pictures with the tray full. At least the Summer wasn't a total waste.

    I plan on going to the desert tomorrow, where I use to sweep the gold out of the caliche. But, I'll be using the MXT in an area where several (that I know of) nuggets have been found, a couple weighing over 2oz each. Personally, I'd settle for a couple of 3 or 4 gram nuggets.

    Anyway, I'll let you know if I did any good when I get back. Meanwhile, I'll be hoping for one of your
    great stories when I return about Sat. or Sunday.

    Love and Respect,

    Eagle

  3. #753
    us
    Medicine/Holy Man

    May 2010
    California
    Whites MXT, Whites TDI
    1,857
    582 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Re: Bedrock and Gold: The mysteries . . .

    For an update on the trip to the desert, it didn't happen. I was going with my closest friend
    (in the area), and his girlfriend is undergoing cancer treatments. She wasn't feeling well, so
    he decided to spend the week-end with her.

    But, the good news is, we'll be leaving here early Monday morning to head up to the Merced
    River. There should be a lot of bedrock exposed for using the MXT.

    Once we get there, we'll be staying at the last campground on the road down river. Just in case
    any of my friends are able to meet up with me/us. I'll be more than happy to show you around.

    Also, I'll be going to the Verizon store to make sure that I have cell phone access when I get
    into Mariposa, in just a few minutes.

    Eagle

  4. #754
    Charter Member

    Apr 2003
    Alberta
    Various Minelabs(5000, 2100, X-Terra 705), Falcon MD20, Tesoro Sand Shark, Gold Bug Pro, Makro Gold Racer.
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    Re: Bedrock and Gold: The mysteries . . .

    Hefty, Eagle, and 63,

    That crack sure does look like it's got potential. I've read Eagle's musings on the subject and he's got some great input for you. I'd chase that crack until it visually pinches right out, and then maybe go a bit beyond that as sometimes cracks deeper down have snapped shut. But, after a bit of chiseling, you should be able to tell if it's an old crevice underneath as you'll see all kinds of oxidized (red or purplish) material in the rock if there's a closed crevice underneath. Be wary though as sometimes you'll only get the oxidized material for a few inches and then it disappears, and if you can't find any more trace as you chisel deeper, you're most likely at the very end. However, I've chased some of those snapped-shut crevices before and got wonderful gold out of them.

    Get a big (7-8 ft.) heavy bar and bust the crevice open as far as you can, and then use a series of different chisels ( big, wide-tipped masonry chisels, flat chisels, little bent screwdrivers or crevice cleaners to scratch and scrape the bottom of the crack) to completely clean every bit (can't overemphasize this) of material out of the crevice, and then go on an investigation to see if it continues past where you can visually see the end.

    Eagle--the tray is made of aluminum and it's the slickest tray I've ever used for pouring out, and helping to sort out gold. I hope your trip happens soon, and be sure to keep us updated. Your wealth of knowledge is most welcome on this thread.

    All the best, and thanks to the three of you for your great posts,

    Lanny

    Nothin' quite as fun as chasin' sassy nugget gold! http://www.treasurenet.com/forums/me...mysteries.html

  5. #755
    Charter Member

    Apr 2003
    Alberta
    Various Minelabs(5000, 2100, X-Terra 705), Falcon MD20, Tesoro Sand Shark, Gold Bug Pro, Makro Gold Racer.
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    Re: Bedrock and Gold: The mysteries . . .

    I see you have a big bar--make sure it's heavy enough (thick enough steel), with a wider chisel tip (not a pointed tip) to get in to the crevice to split it.

    All the best,

    Lanny
    Nothin' quite as fun as chasin' sassy nugget gold! http://www.treasurenet.com/forums/me...mysteries.html

  6. #756
    us
    Northern California

    Aug 2007
    Southern California
    XLT, GMT, 6000D Coinmaster
    3,546
    3494 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Re: Bedrock and Gold: The mysteries . . .

    Hi Lanny & All,
    This particular bar has a bend in it at the chisel end making it a bit difficult to work with. As of yet Hefty has not been able to work on this project as "other" things at home have been more pressing as they were weather related and needed to be done now. I'm sure that just as soon as he can he will be back on this project.

    Myself, I've come back out of the mountains for the year after having spent 3 months "out there", having picked up a little gold, having strained many body parts while carrying my pack in and out of many canyons, having met several miners and having been invited to join one particular fellow at an awesome claim IF the dredging ban is lifted. He'd heard that Governor Brown has told the Fish & Game folks to get this study done quickly and supposedly they told him it would be complete sometime in January 2012. Has anyone else heard this A question about the mining offer that was extended to me - for a $5000 fee, good for one year, I would share in 50% of the gold recovered while the claim holder would supply a 5" dredge, highbanker and sundry related items. I would provide assistance to him as well as labor. I was shown some good looking gold both in pictures as well as in my hand. Does this sound like a reasonable offer?? What else do I need to ask or know about the operation??

    Attached are only three pictures, out of the many I took this year, depicting the extremes of the weather I was involved with this summer as well as a shot of "all" the gold and some of the lead I recovered this year. A lot of work, a lot of learning with more needed and a great deal of enjoyment was had through all of my adventures this summer. Hefty provided me with a major feast at his claim and it was SOOO enjoyed and the bread I'd baked in camp went well with one of the meals we had together. He and I moved some serious gravel and by next season our backs should have healed from the effort we expended. The final results of "the Crack" will be interesting to learn about.

    The gold you see mostly came from dry bedrock situations, the water was a bit cold to be in without a wet suit and that was Not going to be carried in as well as everything else I carried. Very little gold came from moving gravel on my own. I moved some very large boulders with either bar or cable & hoists with very little to show for all the effort. Again, the adventure was worth it. Finally, "all" the gold you see along with some lead sits on top of a U.S. Dime. Was it worth it? I've never before been out for three months and though some of it was very hard, I would not have missed it and will always remember this very special year!

    The detecting I did was with a Whites GMT and I ran it hot all the time. Yes it was noisy so I could have easily missed smaller gold but when it zip-zipped there was almost always a target. I always had the machine on auto ground balance and though I wanted to try it in manual balance I never got to it. I had mixed results with the largest coil for this machine and I admit to not having enough time with it to understand it's proper use. The Sierra coil is heavy, it really floats and therefore requires some muscle power to keep it under the water which limits its usefulness for checking underwater bedrock cracks as it is very tiring to keep it under the water. During my time out there I had one switch go bad on the GMT but then I've had the machine since 2007 so the problem could have been caused by me. Whites repaired it and got it back to me very quickly, they are all about customer service and I'm very pleased with them.

    All my best to all, 63bkpkr
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    Out searching w/GMT & friend under my arm

  7. #757
    Charter Member

    Apr 2003
    Alberta
    Various Minelabs(5000, 2100, X-Terra 705), Falcon MD20, Tesoro Sand Shark, Gold Bug Pro, Makro Gold Racer.
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    Re: Bedrock and Gold: The mysteries . . .

    63--really enjoyed your post, and I love the incredible pictures you take. I admire your courage and stamina on your three month sojourn of golden odyssey. On a related note, I've been to California a few times, and I've been in the mountains as well. But, for some reason, it had never struck me the extremes of temperature and the wide variance in climate your environment provides that far south! I mean, here where I live, I expect that, and it is highly predictable, and most often dreaded. However, taking in to consideration the altitude of some of your ranges, I think I'm beginning to understand the resources Mother Nature has to create with.

    As far as your poke of gold that you've posted on the dime, I've seen many, many gold-seekers do incredibly far worse. I know that amount of gold might not make you feel like you've accomplished all that much, but you need to remember that you now know many places not to look, and many techniques that you'll forever abandon. You've now equipped yourself with refined skills in multiple disciplines for chasing the gold.

    Please, always feel free to post your adventures and magnificent pictures on this thread. You, Hefty Sushi, Eagle, Nuggy and other erstwhile posters are welcome to enhance this thread at any time. As well, I welcome input from sincere, fellow gold-seekers, as any repository of knowledge (especially this one) is always in need of some more pertinent, helpful information, as well as some good, solid laughter and entertainment from time to time.

    All the best,

    Lanny
    Nothin' quite as fun as chasin' sassy nugget gold! http://www.treasurenet.com/forums/me...mysteries.html

  8. #758
    Charter Member

    Apr 2003
    Alberta
    Various Minelabs(5000, 2100, X-Terra 705), Falcon MD20, Tesoro Sand Shark, Gold Bug Pro, Makro Gold Racer.
    4,776
    4481 times
    Prospecting

    Re: Bedrock and Gold: The mysteries . . .

    Hi there,

    As an update, Sushi Dog asked me to let you know that he's sad and sorry that he's been doggone up against it for the last little while, making it unable to keep the rest of us informed with reports of his normal howling successes (or boondoggle mishaps) here on the Internet. He's not in the dog pound, nor is he in the dog house; nonetheless, he hasn't been able to get off his chain either. His extenuating circumstances have flat-out stopped him from chasin' the gold.

    But, he wants you all to know he misses you, and that he'll be hounding along soon sniffin' out the gold again, and when that happens, he'll be one happy pooch! Furthermore, he'll have the opportunity every gold hound desires--the chance to catch up with all of his tire-chasin' gold-chasin' buddies.

    All the best,

    Lanny
    Nothin' quite as fun as chasin' sassy nugget gold! http://www.treasurenet.com/forums/me...mysteries.html

  9. #759
    Charter Member

    Apr 2003
    Alberta
    Various Minelabs(5000, 2100, X-Terra 705), Falcon MD20, Tesoro Sand Shark, Gold Bug Pro, Makro Gold Racer.
    4,776
    4481 times
    Prospecting

    Re: Bedrock and Gold: The mysteries . . .

    Some pictures from some of this summer's adventures.





















    All the best,

    Lanny
    Nothin' quite as fun as chasin' sassy nugget gold! http://www.treasurenet.com/forums/me...mysteries.html

  10. #760
    us
    Northern California

    Aug 2007
    Southern California
    XLT, GMT, 6000D Coinmaster
    3,546
    3494 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Re: Bedrock and Gold: The mysteries . . .

    Hi Lanny,
    Is that a picture of yourself looking at us?? Well sir you have some Mighty Fine country to play in as all your pictures testify to and that trout OH! The gold is of course neat but the country you've shown us is absolutely breath taking! Thank you for sharing!!

    I'm back in the city as winter closes in on us here in NorCal, it was a good summer but now it is time to find a job and get the savings account perked up.

    Again, thanks for sharing, 63bkpkr
    Out searching w/GMT & friend under my arm

  11. #761
    Charter Member

    Apr 2003
    Alberta
    Various Minelabs(5000, 2100, X-Terra 705), Falcon MD20, Tesoro Sand Shark, Gold Bug Pro, Makro Gold Racer.
    4,776
    4481 times
    Prospecting

    Re: Bedrock and Gold: The mysteries . . .

    63--yes that's me looking back at you.

    Indeed--the country is unbelievably gorgeous. Yet, most people never see any of it, as you have to get onto the old logging roads, and onto the old trails. Moreover, you must head up canyons that are full of wildlife. Many people turn around when they realize they're in wild country--it makes them tremendously uneasy. As a matter of fact, I've turned around myself when there's far too much grizzly scat in a short distance, and dense brush closing in on each side; but usually, I keep heading up canyons I've never seen before--just to see what I'm missing if I don't. What usually happens is that I find other higher branches in the valleys that lead to yet another series of valleys and peaks. There's so much country to see and so little time--so many streams to prospect and such limited opportunity--so much gold that's still out there and so many places it's hidden.

    I wish you well as you head back to work to get yourself a stake. I admire your courage and undying spirit.

    All the best to you my friend--stay in touch,

    Lanny
    Nothin' quite as fun as chasin' sassy nugget gold! http://www.treasurenet.com/forums/me...mysteries.html

  12. #762
    Charter Member

    Apr 2003
    Alberta
    Various Minelabs(5000, 2100, X-Terra 705), Falcon MD20, Tesoro Sand Shark, Gold Bug Pro, Makro Gold Racer.
    4,776
    4481 times
    Prospecting

    Re: Bedrock and Gold: The mysteries . . .

    One fact, above all others, that seems to stump beginning gold prospectors more than any other concept, is the solid understanding of just how heavy gold is--how much heavier it is than the other objects in the water, and indeed how much heavier the noble metal is than the water itself. Moreover, because gold is incredibly heavy (as compared to other items in the stream), it behaves in a very predictable manner, and it will work itself into incredibly crazy places as it works its way ever downwards until it is obstructed when it reaches "absolute bottom."

    And, yes, almost everyone has read in prospecting or panning books about how gold will "collect" downstream from boulders, and lodge behind trees that transverse the stream, and cache itself behind bedrock outcrops that thrust out into the current, and how it works its way to the bottom. Yes, all good prospecting books cover this.

    However, what is lacking is the understanding of how gold behaves, how it moves on the bedrock and into the bedrock while under hydraulic pressure within a stream environment. This is a problem because how does a rookie, as a gold-seeker, have the opportunity to observe gold interacting with objects and upon bedrock in its natural environment? Well, it's most likely not possible (unless a person is lucky enough to get a gold dredger or underwater sniper to actively show them some gold at the moment it's uncovered and impacted by the stream's current). Yet, in reality, this isn't going to happen for most people.

    I watched a clever video on the Internet where gold was sprinkled into a little artificial stream, with all the common obstructions and bends recreated, and it was amazing how quickly it collected in the "likely" spots mentioned earlier in this post, but it still didn't allow a person to see what happens to it when it hits fractures in the bedrock.

    If it's possible to set up a little current of water in a piece of eaves trough/rain gutter, just drop some gold, of various sizes, into the current and watch what the water does to the different sizes of gold. And, very carefully observe how slowly the gold moves, and how difficult it is for the water to move it, even when you intentionally disturb it in the water column. Now, magnify that lazy effect by imagining the gold down in the strata of a stream, on the bedrock, but protected by a heavy layer of overburden. It's going to take a massive amount of force to move that gold.

    That's why gold has been called "lazy". It really does not want to move, unless it absolutely has to, and when it has to move, it takes the shortest route between two points. Furthermore, even when it's uncovered (all of the overlying overburden removed), it will just sit on the bedrock and shimmy in the current and either not move at all (if it's a big enough piece), or it will very slowly move along the bedrock until it finds any kind of fracture, whereupon it will quickly disappear into that crack or crevice, or lodge itself against a hindering obstruction in the bedrock that it can't get over.

    Why should a prospector care about this? Well, when you're looking for gold, you've got to get all the way down to uncover the aforementioned crevices in the bedrock (that's why smooth bedrock is so often a complete bust)--there's an excellent chance the gold is there in fractured, rough bedrock--and then get down into the fractures of the bedrock. Never overlook a good crack or fault, and always clean them out completely--taking every bit of material--simply scraping the surface is no good. Use a narrow spoon and then a crevicing tool to get right to the bottom of any irregularities--a shovel is far too big for the job--you will definitely leave gold behind.

    Remember--gold is heavy: 19X as heavy as the water and about 10X heavier than the regular stream materials. So, remove all of the overlying materials, and then very carefully clean out all of the nooks and crannies--if you don't--you'll have done all of that hard work to get to the lower strata, and you'll leave the good stuff for someone with more gold sense to find it later.

    Furthermore, if you're detecting and you find gold in a crevice, always chisel down as far as you can to open the crevice up all the way--in fact, go farther than you think you need to--test every bit of material you gather in a gold pan with water. By heading deep, this will allow you to detect signals you'd never be able to detect on the surface. Moreover, you may open an ancient crevice that was sealed eons ago, one that's loaded with gold--it's happened to me enough times that I always chase a gold-bearing crevice to its maximum bottom depth. I then very carefully check what appears to be the absolute bottom to see if there's any cracks with red, orange, or purple iron stain showing in them, as they could be cracks that once snapped shut over an ancient opening deeper down--for that's where the really fun stuff is hiding!

    All the best,

    Lanny
    Nothin' quite as fun as chasin' sassy nugget gold! http://www.treasurenet.com/forums/me...mysteries.html

  13. #763
    us
    Northern California

    Aug 2007
    Southern California
    XLT, GMT, 6000D Coinmaster
    3,546
    3494 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Re: Bedrock and Gold: The mysteries . . .

    Hi Lanny,
    I agree with you that many people just do not go far enough back in to where few humans have ever been. The experience is very special and worth all the work it takes to get there. Moving through heavy brush is work, so is hiking up steep hills while going through heavy brush while looking for bears, snakes and other things that make life tough for a human. I once made it into a clearing part way up a steep hill. On entering the clearing I detected a heavy musky smell in the air. The hair on the back of my neck stood up, all my senses were on high alert and I had the hammer cocked on the 454 in my hand. Then nothing and the odor slowly went away. The spot looked like a good place to settle down for the night or to meet other bears but not a single pile of bear scat was to be seen. Unique experiences like these are bound to happen back in there and the beauty of these places is breath taking.

    You are correct that I've experienced many things that I will know not to repeat. Usually they require a lot of work and mostly wasted effort save for the experience and learning and a little bit of gold. I will keep going out till I can't lift my pack or climb another hill and then I hope I can find some good soul to pass my experiences on to. Good stuff to learn and share it with others!

    Thank you for including the picture of yourself as it is good to have a face to put to a name. You look like you've a lot of years left in you, good. Take care of yourself and make your life a good one. I will post a some pictures in a few days mostly of some interesting rocks I carried out.

    63bkpkr
    Out searching w/GMT & friend under my arm

  14. #764
    us
    Dec 2010
    1,695
    1441 times

    Re: Bedrock and Gold: The mysteries . . .

    Hey Lanny.......Great looking pics, But you forgot the roof on that log cabin, gonna get a bit cold in there come winter
    Great explaination on Suishi dog there.
    Yea been busy here puttin on a roof on the shed and rebuilding this forty year old deck before the rain hits here. Opps to late, started raining today. Good thing the last part of the deck railing to put on is under cover. Had to rebuild just about the whole darn deck.
    Yea that 63 is quite the guy you want to have around when it comes to moving material or just about everything else that goes on out in the wild.
    Hope he comes back to the mountians next year.
    One more shot at that crack this year and that might be it till spring.

    Take care

    Hefty

  15. #765
    Charter Member

    Apr 2003
    Alberta
    Various Minelabs(5000, 2100, X-Terra 705), Falcon MD20, Tesoro Sand Shark, Gold Bug Pro, Makro Gold Racer.
    4,776
    4481 times
    Prospecting

    Re: Bedrock and Gold: The mysteries . . .

    Quote Originally Posted by 63bkpkr
    Hi Lanny,
    I agree with you that many people just do not go far enough back in to where few humans have ever been. The experience is very special and worth all the work it takes to get there. Moving through heavy brush is work, so is hiking up steep hills while going through heavy brush while looking for bears, snakes and other things that make life tough for a human. I once made it into a clearing part way up a steep hill. On entering the clearing I detected a heavy musky smell in the air. The hair on the back of my neck stood up, all my senses were on high alert and I had the hammer cocked on the 454 in my hand. Then nothing and the odor slowly went away. The spot looked like a good place to settle down for the night or to meet other bears but not a single pile of bear scat was to be seen. Unique experiences like these are bound to happen back in there and the beauty of these places is breath taking.

    You are correct that I've experienced many things that I will know not to repeat. Usually they require a lot of work and mostly wasted effort save for the experience and learning and a little bit of gold. I will keep going out till I can't lift my pack or climb another hill and then I hope I can find some good soul to pass my experiences on to. Good stuff to learn and share it with others!

    Thank you for including the picture of yourself as it is good to have a face to put to a name. You look like you've a lot of years left in you, good. Take care of yourself and make your life a good one. I will post a some pictures in a few days mostly of some interesting rocks I carried out.

    63bkpkr
    63--we have something in common--we both have a 454! I've had more than a few hairy scrapes in the brush, and I always go heeled when I don't know what I'm getting into.

    I'm glad you've got the get-up to go into the lost and forgotten regions--that's really where the magic is--seeing things others never see. I'm sure that what pushed the early mountain men into the undiscovered ranges, and the prospectors that followed them.

    Glad you're dedicated to keep at it. I had a good feeling about you when I saw your first few posts--you'll do just fine as you keep at it. The things you learn not to do are some of the most valuable lessons you'll learn. Moreover, one day all of the non-lessons, and the wow-lessons will pay off and you'll be posting pictures of a variety of sassy nuggets!

    Post those pictures please--it'll be great to see where you wandered.

    All the best,

    Lanny
    Nothin' quite as fun as chasin' sassy nugget gold! http://www.treasurenet.com/forums/me...mysteries.html

 

 

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