Welcome guest, is this your first visit?
Member
Discoveries
 
Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 78
Like Tree40Likes

Thread: How deep is your silver?

« Prev Thread | Next Thread »
  1. #16
    us
    Oct 2009
    8,434
    7153 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Quote Originally Posted by GoDeep View Post
    Soil very much becomes a liquid state.

    Heres a further brief read for you on how plasticity of soil is determined and how it too becomes a liquid state when excess water is present:


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atterberg_limits
    Your wiki skills are weak. The artificial mixing of a clay substrate with water to achieve a specific "liquid" state in a laboratory setting has 0% bearing on compacted turf soils with or without rain.

    try again, this is fun proving you wrong.

  2. #17
    Charter Member
    us
    Classic car lover

    Jul 2017
    some where in the great state of Texas
    Teknectics eurotek pro bounty hunter time ranger bounty hunter quick draw 2 used a teroso compadre. Carry a 22 cal. six-shooter.
    4,371
    8180 times
    coin roll hunting,shooting,Metal Detecting, swimming,
    Banner Finds (1)
    i don't dig much silver coins i have two quarters they were at 2 in. but i have 3 silver nuggets i found around in the woods at 5-7 in.

  3. #18
    us
    TunaTonker

    Nov 2016
    Whites, Garrett, Minelab
    182
    204 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Quote Originally Posted by Jason in Enid View Post
    No, they don't. Footings are deep enough to not suffer from frost heave. Again, the vast majority of all buildings are built on pure soil, no bedrock, yet these building haven't sunk in hundreds of years. Strange.... its as if the soil is actually compact enough to support the load, and NOT becoming liquid every time it rains.

    What good would gravel do? It's denser than the soil, so it would sink, just like the building on top of it.... except none of it is really sinking
    What good would gravel do you ask? Naturally occurring gravel beds are usually found below the soil layer and just above the bedrock, they can support more weight then soil, but not as much as bedrock. Soil is finer, and much less resistant to separation then gravel, compacts easier and thus can't support as much weight. Lighter structures can built upon gravel, heavier buildings, like an office building often go to bedrock if possible.

  4. #19
    us
    Oct 2009
    8,434
    7153 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Quote Originally Posted by GoDeep View Post
    What good would gravel do you ask? Naturally occurring gravel beds are usually found below the soil layer and just above the bedrock, they can support more weight then soil, but not as much as bedrock. Soil is finer, and much less resistant to separation then gravel, compacts easier and thus can't support as much weight. Lighter structures can built upon gravel, heavier buildings, like an office building often go to bedrock if possible.
    You are losing your own argument here... First, YOU made the statement adding gravel to building footprints, which has ZERO to do with "naturally occurring gravel beds above bedrock"

    Again.... coins dont "sink", because soil is NOT a liquid medium.

  5. #20
    us
    TunaTonker

    Nov 2016
    Whites, Garrett, Minelab
    182
    204 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Quote Originally Posted by Jason in Enid View Post
    Your wiki skills are weak. The artificial mixing of a clay substrate with water to achieve a specific "liquid" state in a laboratory setting has 0% bearing on compacted turf soils with or without rain.

    try again, this is fun proving you wrong.
    Huh? Plasticity and water content of soil applies to all types of soil. All have a rate. Heres some more reading. I can provide more information if needed, but my claims are all grounded in science.

    I'm curious, have you ever stepped in water saturated soil, did you not sink? Have you ever stepped in mud, did your foot not sink? Have you never witnessed a mudslide? Proof of soils non cohesiveness and apparent liquid state when subjected to water is all around us and observable and measurable.

    LIQUID LIMIT OF SOIL – WHAT, WHY & HOW?
    Suryakanta | March 7, 2015 | Geotechnical, How To, Soil, Soil Investigation, Tests On Soil | 5 Comments
    What is Liquid Limit of Soil?
    When water is added to dry soil, it changes its state of consistency from hard to soft. If we add water to a fine grained soil, then water will change its consistency from hard to semi hard. If we continue to add more water then again the soil will change its state of consistency from semi hard to plastic and finally reach a liquid consistency stage. When the soil reaches liquid consistency state, it has remain no cohesive strength to retain its shape under its own weight. It will start to deform its shape. So the amount of water which is responsible for this state of consistency of soil is called liquid limit of soil. In other words we can define liquid limit as
    “It is the minimum water content at which the soil is still in the liquid state, but has a small shearing strength against flow.”

  6. #21
    us
    TunaTonker

    Nov 2016
    Whites, Garrett, Minelab
    182
    204 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Quote Originally Posted by Jason in Enid View Post
    You are losing your own argument here... First, YOU made the statement adding gravel to building footprints, which has ZERO to do with "naturally occurring gravel beds above bedrock"

    Again.... coins dont "sink", because soil is NOT a liquid medium.

    Your point about my point about gravel is nonsensical. Gravel beds occur naturally or can be laid by a builder. Top soil is removed and a gravel bed laid in.

    Again, soil is not a cohesive medium. It is fine grained, readily separates and can effectively become a liquid medium when subjected to enough water.

  7. #22
    us
    Oct 2009
    8,434
    7153 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Quote Originally Posted by GoDeep View Post
    Huh? Plasticity and water content of soil applies to all types of soil. All have a rate. Heres some more reading. I can provide more information if needed, but my claims are all grounded in science.
    HA! Your understanding of the science you talk about is laughable. Plasticity of soils are used for modern engineering to take account for expansion, contraction and movement of the soils as moisture content changes through seasons. It has nothing to so with your assertion that a coin dropped on the ground today will physically sink through the surrounding, naturally compacted soils on its own without additional force.

    Your attempt at using "science" is nothing more than a red hearing to distract from your first point, which you lost long ago.

  8. #23
    us
    Sep 2011
    Denver, Colorado
    Garrett AT Pro, AT Gold, ATX, MH7 (oldie!) Minelab Explorer SE Pro
    1,753
    1527 times
    I've stepped in saturated soil and not sunk, mud, etc.
    I'm with Jason. Coins don't normally sink, they are covered up. When archies do a dig, do you think that they dig to dig up something that sunk or got buried?

  9. #24
    us
    TunaTonker

    Nov 2016
    Whites, Garrett, Minelab
    182
    204 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Quote Originally Posted by Jason in Enid View Post
    HA! Your understanding of the science you talk about is laughable. Plasticity of soils are used for modern engineering to take account for expansion, contraction and movement of the soils as moisture content changes through seasons. It has nothing to so with your assertion that a coin dropped on the ground today will physically sink through the surrounding, naturally compacted soils on its own without additional force.

    Your attempt at using "science" is nothing more than a red hearing to distract from your first point, which you lost long ago.
    Are you serious? Is this some sort of April fools? This is basic geology. There are thousands of articles and diagrams of soil layer composition (just google soil layers). Heavier objects settle through soil over time. This is a fact. Denser, heavier metals settle deeper, fact.

  10. #25
    us
    TunaTonker

    Nov 2016
    Whites, Garrett, Minelab
    182
    204 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Quote Originally Posted by xr7ator View Post
    I've stepped in saturated soil and not sunk, mud, etc.
    I'm with Jason. Coins don't normally sink, they are covered up. When archies do a dig, do you think that they dig to dig up something that sunk or got buried?
    If you can show me a video of someone stepping in mud and their foot not sinking in, i'll buy anything you are selling me. Jesus may have walked on water, but man does not walk on mud....

  11. #26
    Charter Member
    us
    Sep 2015
    Illinois
    Equinox 600 Garrett Carrot Nokta Waterproof Pinpointer Vibra-tector 730 Lesche 18" and 30" shovel's 4 fried chickens and a coke. And some dry white toast.
    2,805
    3002 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	and-now-for-something-completely-different-gif-11.gif 
Views:	42 
Size:	1.46 MB 
ID:	1587624
    BeenFishin likes this.
    "See your doctor if your detector has a detection for more then four hours!"

  12. #27
    us
    TunaTonker

    Nov 2016
    Whites, Garrett, Minelab
    182
    204 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Yes, if you took a coin, placed it on dry soil, that is shielded from all wind, vibration, heat, cold, water, plant life, animal life etc (in a bubble so to speak) sure, it wouldn't sink. But that's not how soil in nature works. It is fine textured, non-bonded, readily permeable, constantly heaving and cleaving, expanding and contracting by means of water, heat, cold, as well as plant, animal and microscopic life. Heavier metals slowly settle through soil. Some faster then others depending on their surface area, atomic weight and density (like gold will settle faster then silver). It's nature and science.

    I think I've hijacked the OP's thread, so peace and may the science be with you....
    Last edited by GoDeep; May 07, 2018 at 05:50 PM.

  13. #28
    us
    Aug 2009
    White's MXT all pro, MXT300 D2, 950, 4X6 DD, detech ultimate 13" DD coils
    2,210
    741 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Well the parks around here have been pounded for years and all the silver left is 10"+ at the parks, normal depth at old home sites seems to be 6" to 8" here in Indiana but some silver is at old home sites have been deeper. It's really hard telling what dirt has been moved around over the years in flower beds or what ever, I do like those really deep whisper signals as those are almost always the good old stuff. HH

  14. #29
    us
    Aug 2009
    White's MXT all pro, MXT300 D2, 950, 4X6 DD, detech ultimate 13" DD coils
    2,210
    741 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Soil will build up over time as well as in all the grass clippings breaking down making new soil, less on a hill but more at the bottom of hills where all the leaves, sticks, ect will settle and even soil eroding from the top to the bottom. HH

  15. #30
    us
    TunaTonker

    Nov 2016
    Whites, Garrett, Minelab
    182
    204 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Quote Originally Posted by wingmaster View Post
    Soil will build up over time as well as in all the grass clippings breaking down making new soil, less on a hill but more at the bottom of hills where all the leaves, sticks, ect will settle and even soil eroding from the top to the bottom. HH
    Great point and to clarify, i'm not saying plant, leaves and soil matter depositing on top via wind, erosion, and the natural life cycle of plants don't contribute too to a coins depth, they both (settling as I've described and deposits on top as you've said). And yes to deep signals, those always get me excited!!!

 

 
Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast

Remove Ads

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Some Deep Silver and Some Deep Wheaties Found Today!
    By Cool Hand Fluke in forum Today's Finds!
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: Feb 20, 2018, 05:38 AM
  2. Replies: 9
    Last Post: Oct 13, 2017, 07:28 PM
  3. Replies: 9
    Last Post: Oct 07, 2017, 12:05 AM
  4. Replies: 12
    Last Post: May 18, 2017, 08:47 PM
  5. Replies: 10
    Last Post: Jun 16, 2015, 12:06 PM
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.3.0