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  1. #1
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    Tuberale

    May 2010
    Portland, Oregon
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    How do I?

    Will be making a recovery of a very large meteorite which landed here over 100 years ago. Recovery site is near salt water, so I have to wait for a low tide to make. I'll have to clean overburden. Need to collect a bowling ball sized piece. Any suggestions of how I try doing that? Even if I get several days worth of low tides, hacking the piece I need to ID is problematic. Meteorite is probably a pallasite.

  2. #2
    Charter Member
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    Make America Great Again!

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    If you are so sure on what you have and where it is, rent a backhoe.

  3. #3
    pl
    Jun 2014
    Warsaw
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    I suggest to take corroded piece and make a nickel test or check by XRF. If verification will be positive prepare to exploration like Terry told.
    ----------------
    Good hunting
    Artur

  4. #4
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    Just another Guy In Back

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    Depends...

    You could get a pump and hose and blow off the overburden with water.

    You could blow it off in the same way they blow holes from a boat to hunt for treasure if the tide is in.

    You could blow out the object with the same gear they use to sink dock pilings.

    You can't dig a little today and a little tomorrow and a little the next day. With the tides in and out, it will just keep filling the hole back in.

    You have to take one shot at it, and finish it before the tide comes back in.
    kcm and bill_wabo like this.
    Get up late... Start slow... Taper off...

    I am a second level vegetarian. Cow's eat grass. I eat cows.

  5. #5
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    Tuberale

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    Terry's reply would be good if there was a place to put a backhoe. There isn't.

    Art's suggestion to take a piece ... that's what I need to try to get. Stone is much larger, and still in one piece AFAIK.

    G.I.B. has some good points. There are actually two places this could be, each separated by a small body of water (1 ft. across?) in marshy conditions. Overburden not really a problem, at least I think (only have GEOSAT photos to work from at this time). Object is too large to move, so doesn't make sense to blow it out. G.I.B.'s last point is well taken. Should I use explosives to blast the bowling ball piece off in the time available?

  6. #6
    Charter Member
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    Make America Great Again!

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    NO EXPLOSIVES!!!! If the "meteorite" is really that large you can get enough money to chopper the machines you need in!

  7. #7
    ca
    Sep 2014
    Quebec
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    Chainsaw winch and solid planks to "slide it out"? Chainsaw winch are used for hunting big game, to pull, for example, a moose out of the woods, when you're alone.
    You just need something heavy or solid to tie the winch on, your vehicle if not too far, if not a big rock or tree should be good. I think it would work. Excuse my english and keep us informed please
    Last edited by bill_wabo; May 04, 2016 at 06:03 PM. Reason: info supplement

  8. #8
    us
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    San Antonio, Texas
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    Why mess around" Listen to Terry. There is equipment out there that is huge and will go into anything to retrieve objects. Some come in from the water side, some from the land. I've seen them in action at Padre Island National Seashore. Yep, lots of drilling on our coast, federal or not. Huge semi's doing 60-70 mph(HUGE tires) going down a beach that stops 4 wheelers. Trust me, the equipment is out there...

  9. #9
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    Tuberale

    May 2010
    Portland, Oregon
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    No chopper could lift this, Terry. That's why I don't think it can be moved from the site. I don't believe a barge at high tide could carry this out without grounding.

    Stone said to be 22 feet across. I think that's more like 22 x 18 feet, probably 7-9 feet deep. But still... easily largest meteorite known to strike the earth.
    Last edited by Tuberale; May 05, 2016 at 01:11 PM.

  10. #10
    pl
    Jun 2014
    Warsaw
    Fisher F75 Teknetics Omega 8000 White's VX3, V3i DeTech SSP-2000PI
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    Metal Detecting
    Quote Originally Posted by Tuberale View Post
    Art's suggestion to take a piece ... that's what I need to try to get. Stone is much larger, and still in one piece AFAIK.
    I'm talking about checking the stone. Take a small piece of rust, if is more then 1% by weight of nickel that should be a meteorite. Are you 100% sure that is a meteorite?
    If we are talking about how to pull out this stone I have suggestion- see photo
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	morasko261kg.jpg 
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    They were taking 264 kg meteorite.
    see on Art & Met - Meteoryty
    Last edited by Art_Blade; May 05, 2016 at 03:31 PM.
    ----------------
    Good hunting
    Artur

  11. #11

    Feb 2006
    528
    335 times
    Roughly where is this. I am familiar with much of Oregon and might be able to offer some advice based on area knowledge. PM if you do not want location open to all.

  12. #12
    us
    Tuberale

    May 2010
    Portland, Oregon
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    Southern Oregon coast. A witnessed fall. Impact heard (and felt?) 50 miles away. Day and time of fall known. Also weather conditions. Fell in a blizzard, which is very rare for this area. Dumped 3-10 feet of snow: which is why it remains lost today. Visible by satellite photographs, though.

    Art's suggestion is well taken. But hard to work through in a bog.
    Last edited by Tuberale; May 05, 2016 at 11:53 PM.

  13. #13
    kcm
    kcm is offline
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    The only way you're going to remove something of that size and weight is to trench into it, then use air bags to float it out into a more manageable location.

    You're trying to get down 7'-9' in mucky marsh and mud during low tide?!?!? You might have better luck loading a small excavator on a barge and coming in and digging just before tide goes out. Don't worry if the barge gets stranded there - it'll be able to float out a few hours later.

    As you haven't yet located the actual piece, you might try going out there in a boat and use a long rod to probe down in the muck. This would be a two-person operation - one to keep the boat in position from wave action. ...This is assuming high tide actually covers a portion of the piece. If not, then you might have to bring in a boat just before the tide goes out and haul in floating panels to build a makeshift work platform. You can buy a product already made (SIP's, or Structural Insulated Panels), or you can make your own using 2 layers of plywood with a sheet of 4" thick polyfoam board sandwiched in between. ...Guess you could try using styrofoam instead, but it tends to break too easily.

  14. #14
    Charter Member
    us
    Sep 2015
    Illinois
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    That would be the biggest BANNER find ever! Congrats on the find
    "See your doctor if your detector has a detection for more then four hours!"

  15. #15
    us
    Tuberale

    May 2010
    Portland, Oregon
    White's Coinmaster Pro
    4,047
    686 times
    Quote Originally Posted by kcm View Post
    The only way you're going to remove something of that size and weight is to trench into it, then use air bags to float it out into a more manageable location.

    You're trying to get down 7'-9' in mucky marsh and mud during low tide?!?!? You might have better luck loading a small excavator on a barge and coming in and digging just before tide goes out. Don't worry if the barge gets stranded there - it'll be able to float out a few hours later.

    As you haven't yet located the actual piece, you might try going out there in a boat and use a long rod to probe down in the muck. This would be a two-person operation - one to keep the boat in position from wave action. ...This is assuming high tide actually covers a portion of the piece. If not, then you might have to bring in a boat just before the tide goes out and haul in floating panels to build a makeshift work platform. You can buy a product already made (SIP's, or Structural Insulated Panels), or you can make your own using 2 layers of plywood with a sheet of 4" thick polyfoam board sandwiched in between. ...Guess you could try using styrofoam instead, but it tends to break too easily.
    You've made some excellent suggestions for total recovery. Thank you!

    But for now, really only need a chunk of it for analysis and identification purposes.

 

 
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