Rock ID
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  • 1 Post By bonedoggle

Thread: Rock ID

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  1. #1
    us
    Chief Bonedoggler

    Jan 2013
    Philadelphia
    Minelab Whites Fisher
    89
    88 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Rock ID

    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	1802574Click image for larger version. 

Name:	ImageUploadedByTreasureNet.com1581964911.361388.jpg 
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Size:	697.9 KB 
ID:	1802575Click image for larger version. 

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Size:	670.0 KB 
ID:	1802577

    Greetings all. Posting here bc of wishful thinking. Looks like a meteorite but am almost certain itís not.

    Anyone confirm what this is?
    Magnetite? Hematite?

    Thoughts are appreciated

    HAppy hunting.

  2. #2
    gb
    Dec 2019
    Surrey
    511
    1354 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Loads of vesicles (bubbles), so not a meteorite. An obviously melted appearance. Not natural, I think. Some folks will call it slag but I think it's furnace clinker... both industrial waste byproducts.
    PetesPockets55 likes this.

  3. #3
    us
    Chief Bonedoggler

    Jan 2013
    Philadelphia
    Minelab Whites Fisher
    89
    88 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Pretty heavy. I think slag is quite light. No?
    PetesPockets55 likes this.

  4. #4
    gb
    Dec 2019
    Surrey
    511
    1354 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Furnace slag usually has a specific gravity (density relative to water) of around 3... about the same as non-vesicular basalts and rather higher than sedimentary rocks which are usually around 2.5, or igneous rocks such as granite at around 2.6

    Slag can also have significant amounts of native metal, depending on its origin, that pushes up the specific gravity even more. Clinker may be around the same value but often has a lot more vesicles that can push the apparent specific gravity downwards (because the vesicles are just trapped gases that create a sponge-like structure).

  5. #5

    Feb 2006
    1,466
    1537 times
    As Red-Coat has posted, your item is not a meteorite. If you have an interest in meteorites, please pick up a few handbooks. Studying the websites of Certified Meteorite Laboratories is also very helpful in determining if your rock may be a meteorite.

    Time for more coffee. Enjoy.

 

 

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