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  1. #1
    hu
    Gypsyheart~ Queen of Rust

    Nov 2005
    Ozarks
    12,689
    46 times

    1903 ...Percifer Carr Dishes Unearthed... Buried during Revolutionary War


    Newspaper article July 5 1903
    http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive...CF&oref=slogin

    1904-
    Within the last year, at Cooperstown, New York, a quantity of old porcelain has come to light. A farmer was ploughing, when suddenly the plough struck some hard substance, and a moment later there was a crash as of broken crockery. Investigation proved that he had struck a wooden chest, filled with china articles. There were eighty pieces in all, and fifty were saved in a perfect condition. As for the chest, it had crumbled to bits on exposure to the air, only the rough iron lock and hinges surviving. The history of these specimens is known. They were buried one hundred and twenty-five years ago by Percifer Carr, who was employed by Colonel Edmeston, an officer in the French and Indian Wars. The Colonel received for his services a grant of one thousand acres, and Carr had a comfortable home on this land. Indian troubles caused him to leave for a time, and he buried his china. Among the pieces are some very choice Old Worcester, with both Hancock's and Holdship's designs, very similar to the teapot shown. Other pieces are in plain blue, and in brown and pink.

    The farmer who ploughed up these treasures, for they are almost as valuable as gold, has not been allowed to retain them, as he only rented the farm. The owner of the property stepped in and claimed, them, and after they had reposed in a bank under the care of a sheriff for some months, the court upheld his claim. Collectors from all over the country have been interested to have them come on the market.


    Percifer Carr (d. 1804) was a British allied Loyalist living in what is now Otsego County, New York around the time of the American Revolution.

    Carr served as a Sergeant with Colonel William Edmeston in the French and Indian War and was later employed as an agent for Edmeston and his brother Robert in establishing claims on tracts of land on the eastern bank of the Unadilla River just west of George Croghan's Otsego patent near what is now the hamlet of South Edmeston in the Town of Edmeston. Carr was then made caretaker for these tracts, which became known as Mount Edmeston (also known as Edmeston Plantation, Edmeston Manor, Carr's Garden, and commonly the Carr farm). The Edmeston brothers returned to England, but sent a number of settlers, likely including some Irish indentured servants, back to their estate. In 1773, William returned to Mount Edmeston to personally supervise its development, and by 1775, its population was nearing 100.


    Dishes believed to have been buried by Carr on his farm during the RevolutionWith the advent of the Revolutionary War, Edmeston, now a British Major, was detained by American patriots in the eastern part of the state and Carr continued to manage Mount Edmeston. But, as a known Tory, he was suspected by patriots at Cherry Valley and German Flatts of selling provisions to Joseph Brant. In September 1778, a group of Native Americans who were allied with the British, mistakenly set Carr's house on fire and carried him and his wife to Canada through the Niagara region. At least one account has stated that Carr was treated very poorly, having been forced to lie down in steams to allow his captors to use his body as a footbridge.

    Carr and his wife returned to Mount Edmeston in 1783. Major Edmeston who had returned to duty in Europe, hired Carr to rebuild his estate, but in 1788, Robert Edmeston returned to America and fired Carr. John Tunnicliff, an influential farmer in the area, tried to mediate the dispute, but, as Tunnicliff reported in a letter to William Cooper, his efforts proved fruitless, even though Carr's friends and neighbors signed an affidavit testifying to his "frugal & industrious" dealings on behalf of his landlord. Carr's direct appeal for relief to William Edmeston, on the grounds of old age and a "State of absolute Penury", was equally without success. Finally, however, a small piece of property was secured for him, and Carr remained in Otsego County until his death in 1804, when he was buried on John Tunnicliff's farm near Schuyler Lake.




    D.A.R. Marker in Plot Near West Edmeston — Edmeston Local June 24, 1938.

    The marker erected by the Col. Israel Angell Chapter DAR. Of New Berlin on the Carr farm two miles south of West Edmeston and dedicated June 19, 1914, has been moved to a plot 12 by 20 feet farther south to the new road to South Edmeston.
    The old road has been abandoned. The inscription on the tablet reads: "In memory of the Three Scouts killed on the estate of Percifer Carr by Brandt’s Indians. September 1778. Erected by the Col. Israel Angell Chapter, N.S., D.A.R."
    It is fenced on three sides and is accessible from the highway. The Carr farm is famous for the beautiful old dishes unearthed on it a few years ago. They were buried by the Carr family in the Revolutionary times when Brandt made his raid. (The spelling of the name Brant and Brandt are interchangeable)
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    I go a great distance,while some are considering whether they will start today or tomorrow

  2. #2
    us
    Jun 2007
    Whites XLT
    1,745
    28 times
    Banner Finds (1)

    Re: 1903 ...Percifer Carr Dishes Unearthed... Buried during Revolutionary War

    Cool story you found there Gypsy. HB

  3. #3
    hu
    Gypsyheart~ Queen of Rust

    Nov 2005
    Ozarks
    12,689
    46 times

    Re: 1903 ...Percifer Carr Dishes Unearthed... Buried during Revolutionary War

    I was thinking of the area surrounding that place and how many other people might have buried valuables during the Indian raids........
    I go a great distance,while some are considering whether they will start today or tomorrow

  4. #4
    us
    Dec 2004
    Long Island New York
    White's XLT
    1,894
    2 times

    Re: 1903 ...Percifer Carr Dishes Unearthed... Buried during Revolutionary War

    Great article Gypsy, thanks for posting!!

    kenb

  5. #5
    us
    Aug 2007
    NJ
    EXCAL 2, SOV. GT
    11,310
    101 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Banner Finds (1)

    Re: 1903 ...Percifer Carr Dishes Unearthed... Buried during Revolutionary War

    great story Gypsy...how on earth do you find these?
    Live your life in such a way, that when your feet hit the floor  in the morning, satan shudders and says, OH CHIT, SHE'S AWAKE.

  6. #6
    us
    "Is that a Geiger Counter?"

    Feb 2006
    South Central Upstate NY in the foothills of the headlands
    '72 RS Kit/Musketeer Advantage with 8" & 10" DD coils/Fisher F75se with 11" DD & 6.5" concentric coils/Sunray FX-1 Probe/Black Widows/Rattler/F-Point/Merlin SXL Pinpointers
    3,838
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    Metal Detecting

    Re: 1903 ...Percifer Carr Dishes Unearthed... Buried during Revolutionary War

    The farmer who ploughed up these treasures, for they are almost as valuable as gold, has not been allowed to retain them, as he only rented the farm.
    Some folks blabbed too much even before the Internet.

    I was thinking of the area surrounding that place and how many other people might have buried valuables during the Indian raids........
    After that maybe similar items were found . . . more discretely.
    America was founded by tough hell-raisers. Rugged citizens who evaded taxes, spoke strongly against tyranny, grew tobacco, brewed beer, distilled spirits, and smuggled weapons. And it will be saved by those same types of citizens.

  7. #7
    us
    Nov 2003
    warwick ny earth
    White's xlt,Tesoro Silver umax,and Compadre.
    314

    Re: 1903 ...Percifer Carr Dishes Unearthed... Buried during Revolutionary War

    awesome story thanks
    I am a landfill of ideas

  8. #8
    us
    Dec 2006
    upstate N.Y.
    Fisher cz-20/minelab explorer xs
    1,359
    51 times
    Banner Finds (1)

    Re: 1903 ...Percifer Carr Dishes Unearthed... Buried during Revolutionary War

    Thanks for the story Gypsy.This all took place just down the road from me.There are numerouse like storys in this area.There was the Sleeper family treasure,suposedly buried not far from me and I recently found an article from a 1909 newspaper about some gold and silver coins found by a farmer while plowing his fields.While looking into this story someone let the cat out the bag and it was reprinted in the local paper back in November.Since the cat is out the bag,I've wanted to post it here but my one finger typing style would take me forever ! If you like I could send you a copy or you may find it at http://www.thedailystar.com/ it was printed on No.24 th 2007 in the lifestyle section.Title "Mystery of missing coins solved 125 years later " Thanks again my friend and keep em coming !

  9. #9
    hu
    Gypsyheart~ Queen of Rust

    Nov 2005
    Ozarks
    12,689
    46 times

    Re: 1903 ...Percifer Carr Dishes Unearthed... Buried during Revolutionary War

    Quote Originally Posted by kieser sousa
    Thanks for the story Gypsy.This all took place just down the road from me.There are numerouse like storys in this area.There was the Sleeper family treasure,suposedly buried not far from me and I recently found an article from a 1909 newspaper about some gold and silver coins found by a farmer while plowing his fields.While looking into this story someone let the cat out the bag and it was reprinted in the local paper back in November.Since the cat is out the bag,I've wanted to post it here but my one finger typing style would take me forever ! If you like I could send you a copy or you may find it at http://www.thedailystar.com/ it was printed on No.24 th 2007 in the lifestyle section.Title "Mystery of missing coins solved 125 years later " Thanks again my friend and keep em coming !
    Published: November 24, 2007 03:45 am

    Mystery of missing coins solved 125 years later


    Call me way too cautious. If I had been an early settler in Otsego County and knew that American Indians or Tories were headed my way to destroy property or kill me "" I would've been out of there so fast it would make your head spin!

    John Johnson, an early settler in the area of today's Garrattsville, got word of such attackers in 1777. Johnson had many gold and silver coins in his possession. Rather than take them and flee immediately, he decided to bury them in a field on his property.

    That was a bad move for two reasons. First, his family and their neighbors, the Garratts, were captured by the Indians and taken to Canada where they were held captive for five years. Second, when Johnson returned to his land by 1783, he THOUGHT he remembered where he'd buried the coins.

    What happened to those coins remained a mystery for a very long time.

    John Johnson had emigrated from England to what is today's town of Burlington in 1774. He had two daughters, and one of them married Robert Garratt, from the family for which the hamlet of Garrattsville was named. The unmarried daughter lived with her parents. Johnson was considered to be comfortably well off, financially speaking.

    Johnson's buried treasure search was quite extensive, but unsuccessful. His unmarried daughter was the only person with him when he hurriedly buried the coins. Johnson accused her of taking the coins. She denied the charge.

    With the two of them living in the same house, one would expect it not to be a very happy home after the accusation was made. She couldn't persuade her father she was innocent, and he refused to talk with her from then on.

    The daughter lived in the family home for a few more years, but then got married and moved away. Johnson died a few years later, but the father-daughter divide was never resolved.

    The accusation of the stolen coins didn't stop there. Other family, in-laws and descendents always kept a difference of opinion going for years to come.

    Nathan Smith was cultivating some corn on John Rockwell's farm near Garrattsville one afternoon in 1903. He noticed a round, shiny yellow object when he was digging and had no idea what he had discovered. Smith dug some more and soon came across a silver half-crown bearing the likeness of James II and the date 1685.

    Smith reported his findings to John Rockwell, and the two continued to dig. They found the remainder of Johnson's treasure, and agreed that the proceeds of their search would be divided equally between them.

    Smith and Rockwell marked off a 12-foot square plot of ground and dug in six inches. They uncovered 33 gold and 37 silver coins, a few coppers and a silver and agate sleeve button.

    The gold coins dated between 1730 to 1769, most of them minted during the reigns of George II and George III of the United Kingdom.

    The silver pieces, with the exception of one Spanish piece of eight, were dated from 1683 to 1698 and were issued during the reigns of James II and William III. The copper coins were English half pennies dated 1718 and 1724.

    The coins changed hands over time. Willard V. Huntington purchased many of them, which are believed to be in the collection of the Huntington Library of San Marino, Calif. Some others were given or sold to Johnson descendents. Some have ended up in area collectors' possession.

    Smith and Rockwell solved a mystery of nearly 125 years. Depending on your view of the afterlife, one might wonder if John Johnson and his daughter started speaking again after 1903?

    On Monday: Oneonta's water from the tap attracted a lot of attention from near and far.

    City Historian Mark Simonson's column appears twice weekly. On Saturdays, his column focuses on the area during the Depression and before. His Monday columns address local history after the Depression. If you have feedback or ideas about the column, write to him at The Daily Star, or e-mail him at simmark@stny.rr.com. His website is www.oneontahistorian.com.

    I go a great distance,while some are considering whether they will start today or tomorrow

  10. #10
    us
    Dec 2006
    upstate N.Y.
    Fisher cz-20/minelab explorer xs
    1,359
    51 times
    Banner Finds (1)

    Re: 1903 ...Percifer Carr Dishes Unearthed... Buried during Revolutionary War

    Way cool ! Thanks Gypsy,now would ya like to come help me find the rest ? I figger there's got to be the matching cufflink at least there still.

  11. #11
    us
    Mar 2009
    1

    Re: 1903 ...Percifer Carr Dishes Unearthed... Buried during Revolutionary War

    kieser sousa/rip: I live in Brookfield and would be very interested in doing some research on this topic. I can't believe they found EVERYTHING!!! Let me know if you are interested in looking into this together. Thanks!!!

  12. #12

    Nov 2006
    Central,Ny
    Whites DFX
    995
    13 times
    The Carr Farm is where Adam Helmer made his famous run to Fort Dayton. Over 30 miles. It's depicted in the movie Drums along the Mohawk.

 

 

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