Help with identification
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  1. #1
    us
    Apr 2009
    North Idaho
    White's MXT
    40

    Help with identification

    I found this stone about 10 years ago in Idaho. At first I thought it was just an interesting stone. I have been checking on a few artifact sites and now think it may be a stone hammer? Any help would be appreciated very much.
    The grove goes about one third of the way through the stone and is only on one side.




    "We live in the land of the free, only because of the brave"

  2. #2
    us
    Apr 2008
    Southern Ohio
    7,430
    6024 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Banner Finds (4)

    Re: Help with identification

    I don't see any evidence of that stone ever being altered by anything other than Mother Nature. There aren't any pecking or grinding marks on it that I can see from your pictures. If it had actually been a Hammerstone both ends, or at least one end, would show evidence of battering from being used. It looks to be a sedimentary rock that has had the softer material erode faster that the other material so that's why it looks grooved.

    It is definitely a very cool looking rock, but unfortunately not an artifact.
    "Welcome back my friends, to the show that never ends."

  3. #3
    us
    Apr 2007
    sandusky, ohio
    1,128
    10 times

    Re: Help with identification

    very interesting find! i tend to agree with dorkfish's conclusion. keep it anyways!

  4. #4
    us
    Apr 2009
    North Idaho
    White's MXT
    40

    Re: Help with identification

    Thanks for the replies, I appreciate the information. I am trying to learn more about this fascinating hobby!
    "We live in the land of the free, only because of the brave"

  5. #5
    us
    I breed scarlet and gray

    Feb 2009
    fairfield county,ohio
    1,878
    13 times
    Banner Finds (1)

    Re: Help with identification

    i dont know if i want to agree or disagree with dorkfish?very interesting find.99% of grooved stone tools usually only have one groove,but i have seen 2 grooves on an axe before.the only thing that puzzles me is that the grooves are very uniform,dont know if mother nature could do that,she does have a way of foolin us sometimes?dont know if it is worth the expense to you but you could send it to an authenticator and see what they think.thx for sharing the pics
    aint gonna find any heads sittin on the couch

  6. #6
    us
    Jan 2009
    --------->
    3,314
    223 times

    Re: Help with identification

    Interesting piece of stone there. Where was it found? field or creek, was it in conjunction with other artifacts? Imo the squared end and central grooves suggest it was altered by man. I dont know if it's the glare from the light but it has areas that looked polished as well. Also in the 4th pic there appears to be some pecking around the deepest groove. The two shallow ribbons to the side of the main channel could possibly be worn from some kind of hafting technique? If you live near a university with a archaeology dept. you could probably get a knowledgeable opinion on it for free. Either artifact or geofact it's a keeper.
    " Stay frosty, gents "

    www.arrowheadtalk.com

  7. #7
    us
    Jan 2009
    Huntsville. Al
    343
    9 times

    Re: Help with identification

    As small as it is, it might be some type of bannerstone

  8. #8
    us
    Apr 2009
    North Idaho
    White's MXT
    40

    Re: Help with identification

    Thanks for the additional information on this stone. I don't know what a "Bannerstone" is, but I can see the point that if it was a Hammerstone it would probably have some damage to the ends visible. I am not experienced enough to recognize "pecking" marks. I found the stone right in a river channel during the low water cycle. Any indication of "Polishing" may have been by it being in the water for many years. The groove seems to be very uniform and is centered on the stone. I know it is probably hard to judge the stone by pictures alone. I was flyfishing in North Idaho at the time I found the stone and did not investigate the spot for additional artifacts. I put the stone in a box where it has been for the past 10 years and I never went back to look for other objects.
    I took some more pictures that might provide a better view:




    "We live in the land of the free, only because of the brave"

  9. #9
    us
    Oct 2009
    Lower Michigan
    3

    Re: Help with identification

    Hey,
    To go along with Dorkfish's explanation, the material may be some sort of metamophic or igneous rock that was created from layers of the original material. Each layer may have a different hardness or compaction that could cause one layer to erode faster than the other causing grooves. ie: The darker layer appears to be finer grained and slower to erode. The lighter layer appears to be coarse and more likey to erode. It is a cool rock. I would have picked it up also, to add to my rock collection.


    Makado86

 

 

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