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Thread: Hammer/Grinding stone?

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  1. #16
    us
    Jan 2012
    Rhode Island
    2,377
    2712 times
    Relic Hunting
    Now, I would like to simply make a suggestion. I notice that, for the most part, in your threads, you are picking up and looking at large rocks, and stones that cannot be knapped or flaked. Yet, for all of us, 95-99% of all the artifacts we find will be flaked stone artifacts. Things like points, knives, scrapers, drills, flake tools, etc. Artifacts made of the toolstones from our locality or region that could be knapped or flaked into the type of tools mentioned. Yet, many beginners seem to spend a lot of time looking at big rocks and for big tools. You did find a nice grooved weight, and hammerstones are common enough, actually, once you learn to recognize them.


    That said, only a tiny % of the artifacts any of us find will be large hardstone tools, such as axes, gouges, adzes, pestles, celts, etc., etc., etc. The overwhelming % will be smaller flaked artifacts like those I mentioned, made, not of hardstone, but stones that can be knapped. In your first thread, you showed us quartz and argillite artifacts you found. What you really want to do, therefore, is learn to recognize the types of knappable toolstones found in your region, and find the type of artifacts made of those toolstones. In your region, that means learning to recognize, in agricultural fields, after heavy rains, and with permission, or on shorelines, toolstones such as quartz, argillite, rhyolite, quartzite, hornfels, chert or flint, jasper, and a few others.


    You are far better off looking for what constitutes 95+% of what we all find, wherever we hunt: flaked stone artifacts. Eventually, you are likely to find ground stone tools, but they will always constitute a tiny % of your collection. Don't concentrate on large stones at all. Not at first, anyway. Keep your eye out, sure, but focus on what you are far more likely to find, because they are far more common. Flaked stone artifacts.


    Here are four site frames. Meaning these are frames, each from a particular site, from RI. All the materials I mentioned above, the varieties of toolstones in other words, can be seen in these frames. What you need to do is familiarize yourself with the type of knappable material used in your region, and then recognize those lithics when you see them on the ground. Don't focus on big rocks at all. Focus on flakes. Where there are flakes, there will be points, etc. These frames show typical New England points, etc. No matter how many years you put in, this will constitute 95+% of what you are going to find....

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    Well, this last one is not a single site frame, but rather stuff from several sites in RI. But all typical styles and lithic materials found in southern New England:

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  2. #17
    us
    Jul 2013
    St Paul MO
    Whites Prism IV
    36
    91 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
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    I have a few hammerstones and or grinding stones all found in fields with artifacts here is a picture of some of them. I think the one with the drill holes is a firestarter or something similar to that. All these artificats were found in the same area.
    Last edited by americanartifacts33; Mar 08, 2018 at 09:26 AM.

  3. #18
    us
    Apr 2008
    Southern Ohio
    6,784
    4441 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Banner Finds (4)
    I just took some photos of some of better Hammerstones and Stone Tools to show someone so I'll share them here as well. As Charl said, the amount of Stone Tools you find is very small compared to Flint pieces.

    I have collected for 53 years now, and though I do have quite a few Stone Tools, I have about 10 to 15 times more Flint pieces.
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    Last edited by The Grim Reaper; Mar 08, 2018 at 03:19 PM.
    arrow86 and BillA like this.
    "Welcome back my friends, to the show that never ends."

  4. #19
    us
    Jul 2013
    St Paul MO
    Whites Prism IV
    36
    91 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    The Grim Reaper are those your finds? if so holy smokes that's awesome man!

  5. #20

    Jul 2014
    Abandoned Teays River Valley, WV
    254
    280 times
    Relic Hunting
    The object in question, in my opinion shows no apparent alteration by man. But keep asking and look for patterns, shapes, features. The notched points are the easy ones to identify.

  6. #21
    us
    Feb 2018
    New England
    76
    40 times
    Native American artifacts
    Quote Originally Posted by The Grim Reaper View Post
    I just took some photos of some of better Hammerstones and Stone Tools to show someone so I'll share them here as well. As Charl said, the amount of Stone Tools you find is very small compared to Flint pieces.

    I have collected for 53 years now, and though I do have quite a few Stone Tools, I have about 10 to 15 times more Flint pieces.
    Thank you for sharing. Beautiful collection.

  7. #22
    us
    Feb 2018
    New England
    76
    40 times
    Native American artifacts
    Quote Originally Posted by Charl View Post
    Now, I would like to simply make a suggestion. I notice that, for the most part, in your threads, you are picking up and looking at large rocks, and stones that cannot be knapped or flaked. Yet, for all of us, 95-99% of all the artifacts we find will be flaked stone artifacts. Things like points, knives, scrapers, drills, flake tools, etc. Artifacts made of the toolstones from our locality or region that could be knapped or flaked into the type of tools mentioned. Yet, many beginners seem to spend a lot of time looking at big rocks and for big tools. You did find a nice grooved weight, and hammerstones are common enough, actually, once you learn to recognize them.


    That said, only a tiny % of the artifacts any of us find will be large hardstone tools, such as axes, gouges, adzes, pestles, celts, etc., etc., etc. The overwhelming % will be smaller flaked artifacts like those I mentioned, made, not of hardstone, but stones that can be knapped. In your first thread, you showed us quartz and argillite artifacts you found. What you really want to do, therefore, is learn to recognize the types of knappable toolstones found in your region, and find the type of artifacts made of those toolstones. In your region, that means learning to recognize, in agricultural fields, after heavy rains, and with permission, or on shorelines, toolstones such as quartz, argillite, rhyolite, quartzite, hornfels, chert or flint, jasper, and a few others.


    You are far better off looking for what constitutes 95+% of what we all find, wherever we hunt: flaked stone artifacts. Eventually, you are likely to find ground stone tools, but they will always constitute a tiny % of your collection. Don't concentrate on large stones at all. Not at first, anyway. Keep your eye out, sure, but focus on what you are far more likely to find, because they are far more common. Flaked stone artifacts.


    Here are four site frames. Meaning these are frames, each from a particular site, from RI. All the materials I mentioned above, the varieties of toolstones in other words, can be seen in these frames. What you need to do is familiarize yourself with the type of knappable material used in your region, and then recognize those lithics when you see them on the ground. Don't focus on big rocks at all. Focus on flakes. Where there are flakes, there will be points, etc. These frames show typical New England points, etc. No matter how many years you put in, this will constitute 95+% of what you are going to find....

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_9952.jpg 
Views:	50 
Size:	547.4 KB 
ID:	1560582

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_9953.jpg 
Views:	38 
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ID:	1560583

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_9955.jpg 
Views:	40 
Size:	379.9 KB 
ID:	1560584

    Well, this last one is not a single site frame, but rather stuff from several sites in RI. But all typical styles and lithic materials found in southern New England:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_9954.jpg 
Views:	43 
Size:	376.6 KB 
ID:	1560585
    As always, thank you so much. I have saved those beautiful framed pieces for reference and I found that incredibly helpful. Holy crap by the way... what an assortment you have! Truly amazing. I hope to find a fraction of that in my lifetime.
    I have ordered about four different books to better learn what I am doing and between your advice and my time spent I believe I am already doing a lot better identifying true artifacts. Please see my two most recent posts and check out my progress I owe a lot of it to you! You are a great mentor even over the internet.
    Out of curiosity could you guys tell me why it is that there are so many more flaked tools than there are ground stone tools? Is it simply because they were the first items to be recognized and picked up and now they are scarce? Or was there really such a small need for them compared to flaked tools? Canít help but wonder. I have been bypassing much of the big stuff that I normally would have picked up and since I started looking closer Iíve found at least 2 flaked pieces that I am incredibly excited about. Iím getting it now!!

  8. #23
    us
    Feb 2018
    New England
    76
    40 times
    Native American artifacts
    Charl, on my other thread that is now closed, you gave me a lesson in identifying a notch done by man vs a notch in nature. I recently found a stone that I thought could be a shaft abrader but it may also be a broken weight. Iím not sure if it is anything other than natural but I did keep in mind what you said about identifying clear pecking marks and this stone looks to me like it is pecked, though water worn. I would really appreciate it if youíd take a look at it and tell me what you think. Thank you! 🏼
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