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Thread: Lake Finds - Identification Help?

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  1. #1
    us
    Feb 2019
    Minneapolis, MN
    12
    4 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Lake Finds - Identification Help?

    Here is a link to a folder of photos of I took this summer after wiping out down the embankment of a fairly large lake in Minnesota and ending up on my butt in the water. Nice place.

    https://drive.google.com/folderview?...DZMjLF08ixwLw7

    Can anyone give me any information about these? I won't bring up the looks-like-an-animal factor this time, unless someone gets that ball rolling first

    (If I need to post the photos in here as opposed to giving a link for whatever reason, I apologize and can do that.)

    Thank you!

  2. #2

    Sep 2012
    N.E. Texas
    Ace 250 , Pro pointer, AT Pro
    489
    466 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Yes, you'll get more exposure if you post the pics here.
    sandchip and hellokelly like this.
    We've all got holes to fill, and them holes are all that's real. Some fall on you like a storm, sometimes you dig your own. Townes Van Zandt

  3. #3
    Charter Member
    us
    papa

    Feb 2017
    Georgetown, SC
    Fisher F75
    2,394
    3890 times
    Metal Detecting
    Not artifacts. Why do you think they are? First time you have seen broken rocks?


    "And so the population was gradually led into the demoralising temptations of arcades, baths, and sumptuous banquets. The unsuspecting Britons spoke of such novelties as 'civilisation', when in fact they were only a feature of their enslavement." Tacitus, Roman Senator and Historian, written AD 98.

  4. #4
    us
    Feb 2019
    Minneapolis, MN
    12
    4 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Quote Originally Posted by Kray Gelder View Post
    Not artifacts. Why do you think they are? First time you have seen broken rocks?
    Wow. Good one. Original AND efficiently thought-provoking at the same time. Thank you for posing such a meaningful, necessary comment and planting such an invaluable seed for me to mull over for days on end...

    But in all seriousness, thank you for taking the time to look at them. I do appreciate the facts and feedback. Your jabs need some work though.
    Toecutter likes this.

  5. #5
    us
    May 2014
    Eastern Shore Maryland
    1,975
    2116 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Not sure there’s much info to give other than identifying the material / type of stone if you post them under geofacts forum you could find out but as far as artifact info there’s none because they are just naturally formed rocks
    hellokelly likes this.
    I would rather see an authentic broken scraper posted than a G-10 Artifake!

  6. #6
    us
    Jan 2012
    Rhode Island
    2,455
    2847 times
    Relic Hunting
    It's not at all uncommon for people who have no experience with artifacts to wonder if rocks that are just rocks might be artifacts. There is a learning curve involved. One way to not go about entering onto that learning curve is to just pick up rocks and ask or wonder "is this an artifact"? That is truly a fruitless approach. The best way to enter onto that learning curve is to view true artifacts from your region as much as possible. If there are museums/displays in your neck of the woods that display Native American artifacts, visit them. If you can see private collections, do so. I realize both suggestions may not be easy. There are books that will at least provide lots of examples of the various classes of artifacts. They don't have to feature artifacts from Mn., stone tools are similar across regions.

    Bottom line: you need to see as many real artifacts as possible. You need to learn what real stone artifacts actually look like. You've got to build up as many images in your mind of real stone artifacts so you can recognize one on the ground when you see it. You cannot do this by starting with no clear ideas of what they look like, and then looking. Sure, by sheer luck, you may find a projectile point or other artifact, but you are putting yourself at a severe disadvantage by not viewing as many real stone artifacts as possible, first and foremost. You're skipping that first step. Therefore making things impossibly difficult for yourself.
    Owassokie, arrow86 and jamus peek like this.

  7. #7
    Charter Member
    us
    TOM

    Dec 2012
    UPSTATE NEW YORK
    1970 COMPASS- WHITES SILVER EAGLE- WHITES DFX, 4X6DD COIL, 6X8DD COIL, 950 COIL, 10X12SEF COIL- GARRETT PRO POINTER AT, GARRETT AT PRO , MINELAB EXPLORER SE with 8.5x12.5 Cors coil
    5,303
    3131 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Links like that , some of us will not click on in fear of a virus or something--post your pics here for more views
    A BAD DAY OF DIGGING IS BETTER THEN A GOOD DAY AT WORK

  8. #8
    us
    Feb 2019
    Minneapolis, MN
    12
    4 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Quote Originally Posted by Charl View Post
    It's not at all uncommon for people who have no experience with artifacts to wonder if rocks that are just rocks might be artifacts. There is a learning curve involved. One way to not go about entering onto that learning curve is to just pick up rocks and ask or wonder "is this an artifact"? That is truly a fruitless approach. The best way to enter onto that learning curve is to view true artifacts from your region as much as possible. If there are museums/displays in your neck of the woods that display Native American artifacts, visit them. If you can see private collections, do so. I realize both suggestions may not be easy. There are books that will at least provide lots of examples of the various classes of artifacts. They don't have to feature artifacts from Mn., stone tools are similar across regions.

    Bottom line: you need to see as many real artifacts as possible. You need to learn what real stone artifacts actually look like. You've got to build up as many images in your mind of real stone artifacts so you can recognize one on the ground when you see it. You cannot do this by starting with no clear ideas of what they look like, and then looking. Sure, by sheer luck, you may find a projectile point or other artifact, but you are putting yourself at a severe disadvantage by not viewing as many real stone artifacts as possible, first and foremost. You're skipping that first step. Therefore making things impossibly difficult for yourself.
    Thank you, Charl. I've done loads of internet research, but nothing beats the real thing. You're right. Not to make excuses or itake any glory away from my wall of failure here, but I had a thought..

    I was born and raised in Alaska and spent the first 18 years of my life on an island, 252 miles from the mainland, and that is what I saw for 18 years. Not a wide variety of geographic material. When I moved to Minnesota, suddenly there were a million different types of trees and plants and rocks and the leaves actually changed colors and fell in the fall, and I think I'm still stuck in that phase, unfortunately.

    Thank you for my weekly therapy session. I'll send the check to your secretary.

    For now, I shall keep on being curious and mix in some learning along the way.
    jamus peek likes this.

  9. #9
    us
    Aug 2005
    Beautiful Florida
    840
    642 times
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Screenshot_20190101-132214_Facebook.jpg 
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    Looks good to me!��
    hellokelly likes this.

  10. #10

    Mar 2008
    Virginia
    Minelab Equinox 600
    345
    178 times
    I couldn't get the pics to load up. Check out this site for typical Minnesota projectile points. Minnesota Projectile Points

    Here is a more general presentation about stone tools. https://mn.gov/admin/assets/stone-to...m36-247478.pdf
    hellokelly likes this.

  11. #11
    us
    Jan 2011
    762
    547 times
    Don't look like any of them have been worked. Check the edges closer and see if any of them have been worked by something striking them. I am a flint knapper and if I found them I would strike one of them on an edge with another rock to see what happens.
    hellokelly likes this.

 

 

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