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Thread: Gold panning streams in north georgia?

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  1. #21
    ge
    Apr 2011
    Georgia
    Teknetics Delta 4000
    1,115
    6 times

    Re: Gold panning streams in north georgia?

    Quote Originally Posted by Number9
    I saw this dude ^ on YouTube in a North Georgia Gold Panning Video.
    LMAO

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  3. #22
    us
    Oct 2011
    5
    Prospecting

    Re: Gold panning streams in north georgia?

    To Hombre de plata, sorry if that's not right. I live near Tallulah gorge and it's a state park now and you can't get close to edge unless against a fence. The state did a pretty good job, it's beautiful there.
    Remember the Lek Wallesah or however you spell it,,, high wire walk across the gorge?

  4. #23
    us
    Dec 2008
    austin,texas
    Garrett Ace250,garrett pro-pointer
    2,017
    339 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Honorable Mentions (1)

    Re: Gold panning streams in north georgia?

    Check out www.iowagold.com and scroll down to "where to find gold in your state" and start looking.

  5. #24

    Oct 2012
    3
    I live in ellijay ga and go out looking for gold from time to time, I have a friend that lives in suches, ga. Let me know if anyone wants to go and search in my area.

  6. #25

    Oct 2012
    3
    I live in Ellijay, GA and would like know to know if anyone would like to go prospecting in my surrounding area. Send me a message. mark

  7. #26
    us
    Jul 2012
    GA
    White 808, White Sierra Made, pulse induction, LRL
    188
    53 times
    Cache Hunting
    Up arouond Dahlonega is the best. I have panned the Chestatee river and Duke's Creek is one of the best places as well as the Etowah River.

  8. #27

    Oct 2012
    3
    Like to catch trout there certain times of the year, never searched for gold there. I know a good spot to get a lot here but need better equipment

  9. #28

    Oct 2012
    67
    5 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Hiii ,

    you guys can get help from hare..
    Gold Prospecting and Gold Panning How-To

  10. #29
    us
    Aug 2012
    North Georgia
    Various depends on the need at the moment
    502
    250 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Where you really want to look is in the Dawsonville / Dahlonega area---- While I am more into treasure seaches and early gold rush pieces , There is a spot near Auraria that still produces --- I work around the stream alot , open access - and have never seen anyone panning although another MD guy I see at times there said he picked up a nugget when digging a hit on the river bank for some old coins ---- PM me if you want to know more , Here is a link for some of the possible sites --------------------------http://www.iowagold.com/WHERE_TO_FIND_GOLD_USA_PAGES/georgia_gold.htm
    Last edited by Citiboy289; Oct 25, 2012 at 09:45 PM. Reason: Link added

  11. #30

    Feb 2013
    10
    Quote Originally Posted by marktp
    I live in Ellijay, GA and would like know to know if anyone would like to go prospecting in my surrounding area. Send me a message. mark
    Mark I live in middle Georgia. Myself and a friend are getting into gold panning and are very interested in it. Can you tell us what we need to do or point us in the right direction?

  12. #31
    us
    May 2013
    Marietta, Georgia
    Will be an Excalibur II!
    13
    1 times
    Metal Detecting

    National Forests you can pan and metal detect for nuggets

    Look it up....Google Can I metal detect for gold nuggets in National Forests
    Nothing better than being outdoors!

  13. #32
    us
    May 2013
    Marietta, Georgia
    Will be an Excalibur II!
    13
    1 times
    Metal Detecting

    National Forests you can pan and metal detect for nuggets

    Look it up....Google Can I metal detect for gold nuggets in National Forests

    METAL DETECTING ON THE NATIONAL PORESTS

    Metal detecting is a legitimate means of locating gold or other mineral specimens and can be an effective prospecting tool for locating larger mineral deposits. This activity can also be conducted as a recreational activity locating lost coins, jewelry or other incidental metallic items of no historical value. Prospecting using a metal detector can be conducted under the General Mining Laws and is covered under the Forest Service 36 CFR 22~A locatable mineral regulations for lands open to mineral entry. Metal detecting for treasure trove or lost items such as coins and jewelry is managed as a non minerals-related recreation activity. It is Forest Service policy that the casual collection of rocks and mineral samples is allowed on the National Forests.

    Prospecting using metal detectors is a low surface impact activity that involves digging small holes rarely more than six inches deep. Normally, prospecting with a metal detector does not require a notice of intent or written authorization since it only involves searching for and occasionally removing small rock samples or mineral specimens (36 CFR 228 .4(a)).

    Metal detectors may be used on public land in areas that do not contain or would not reasonably he expected to contain archaeological or historical resources. Normally, developed campgrounds, swimming beaches, and other developed recreation sites are open to recreational metal detecting unless there arc archaeological or historical resources present. In such cases, forest supervisors are authorized to close the area to metal detecting and the closure would he posted at the site. Such closure notices are not always practical in undeveloped areas, and federal agencies have not identified every archaeological site on public lands. It is possible therefore, that you may encounter such archaeological remains that have not yet been documented or an area that is not closed even though it does indeed contain such remains. Archaeological remains on public land arc protected under law. If you were to discover such remains, you should leave them undisturbed and notify a Forest Service office.

    2. Prospecting: Using a metal detector to locate gold or other mineral deposits is an allowed activity under the General Mining laws and is subject to the 36 CFR 228A regulations, A Notice of Intent (36 CFR 228.4(a)) is normally not required for prospecting using a metal detector. A Notice of Intent (NOl) is required for any prospecting which might cause disturbance of surface resources. A plan of operation is required for any prospecting that will likely cause significant disturbance of surface resources. Normal metal detecting does not cause surface impacts that require either a NOI or a Plan of Operation. People who use metal detectors for prospecting should bear in mind that many of the mineralized lands within the National Forests and open to mineral entry have been “claimed” by others who have sole right to prospect and develop the mineral resources found on the mining claim. A search of County and Bureau of Land Management records should he made prior to prospecting to determine if an area has been claimed.

    Normally, any gold found can he removed and kept. If the removal of the gold, rocks, or minerals might cause disturbance of surface resources, beyond digging a small shallow hole, an NOI may be required.
    Nothing better than being outdoors!

  14. #33
    us
    May 2013
    Marietta, Georgia
    Will be an Excalibur II!
    13
    1 times
    Metal Detecting

    These laws apply to all National Forest System land and do not vary from state to sta

    These laws apply to all National Forest System land and do not vary from state to state.

    Do not do this....I. Searching for treasure trove: Treasure trove is defined as money, gems, or precious metals in the form of coin, plate, or bullion that has been deliberately hidden with the intention of recovering it later. This activity requires a Special Use Permit under The Act of June 4, 1897 (16 U.S.C. 551). Forest Service Manual 2724.4 states “allow persons to search for buried treasure on National Forest System lands, but protect the rights of the public regarding ownership of, or claims on, any recovered property.
    or this....

    3. Searching for historic or prehistoric artifacts: Using a metal detector to locate archaeological or historical remains is subject to the Antiquities Act of 1906 and the Archaeological Resources Protection Act of 1979 (ARPA) as amended and requires a special use permit. Such permits are granted for scientific research only, however, there are many ways to get involved with organized, scientific research. See below for ways to use metal detectors for this purpose under sanctioned public archaeology programs.

    But you may do this...

    . Recreational pursuits: The most common form of metal detector use is searching for lost coins, jewelry, and incidental metal items having no historical value. Such use is common in developed campgrounds, swimming areas, and picnic areas and requires no permit. However, one must assume personal responsibility to notice if the area may indeed contain archaeological or historical resources and if it does, cease metal detecting and notify a Forest Service office. Not doing so may result in prosecution under the Code of Federal Regulations or ARPA.
    in closing...You can help!...
    Metal detecting in the National Forests is recognized as a legitimate prospecting method under the General Mining Laws and also as a recreational activity for the casual collection of rocks and minerals. This policy does not permit the use of metal detectors in or around known or undiscovered cultural or historic sites in order to protect our valuable, non-renewable historical resources. However, recognizing the universal interest in archaeology and history and the vast public knowledge of such resources, the USDA Forest Service sponsors a public archaeology program through which metal detector enthusiasts and others can help. Passport In Time (PIT) is a national program inviting the public to work with agency archaeologists on historic preservation projects. We have done numerous projects through PIT in cooperation with metal detecting clubs and individuals. The cooperation has been beneficial for both the detectorist's and agency’s archaeologists. Locating archaeological sites becomes a joint endeavor and we learn a great deal. If you would like more information on this program, call 1-800-281-9176 or visit http://www.oasstjortintime.com

    awesome!...Finally common sense and the right to utilize what belongs to we the people PLUS a program that extends an opportunity to work with the Archies...if this is true...the world just became a better place to metal detect on!
    _________________
    Nothing better than being outdoors!

 

 
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