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  1. #16
    ca
    Sep 2005
    Paso Robles
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    Re: The Pearl Ship ...Suggested Reading

    "LENGENDARY AND GEOLOGICAL HISTORY OF LOST DESERT GOLD" by Ralph L. Caine, Gedco Publishing Co., Los Angeles, Calif., Third Edition, 1951.........Now if you can find this Book, you'll be wiser....Happy Trails

  2. #17
    us
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    Re: The Pearl Ship

    Hey Happy Trails 55,

    It's not like they could have scuttled the ship. IT RAN AGROUND when the water level receded. That whole area was an inland sea. My personal thoughts are that an earthquake shifted the land causing the seas' main water source to dry up.

    A ship of this size didn't carry a large crew. With 80-100 miles to walk in the desert, I'm sure they cared more about carrying water and food than pearls or gold. If you really are an outdoorsman, and have seen this area, or others like it, you would KNOW that its all about survival when your ride gets stuck and no AAA around to help. Check out my post TREASURE LEGENDS>Old Shaft Uncovered in Anza-Brrego Desert!!! This is the general area of the Pearl Ship Story. I will also post some of my pics of the area in another post, so everyone can see just how vast and desolate this area is. I've been photographing bighorn sheep in the mountains and finding mansign in the area for a few years now.

    Capt. Iturbe's full report is still in the naval archives in Acapulco, Mx. There is also a copy in the archives in Madrid. Someone who speaks Spanish and a few well placed phone calls will net you a xerox copy of this report.

    This story is definately based in fact. One thought I have that no one else seems to have thought of is that where Iturbe said the ship was may not be accurate. He might have reported the loss so he wouldn't have to give up the royal 5th. He may have gone back and picked it up himself after filing his report in Acapulco.

    Mike
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  3. #18
    ca
    Sep 2005
    Paso Robles
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    Re: The Pearl Ship

    Everything you have said is well taken and I agree with you on some points....The vastness is just that, indeed....The Story of a Earthquake that receded the water is also part of the Indian (Mohave & Cocopah to list a few) creation and emergence stories handed down to present day...."violent earthquakes, a large lake, water serpents and the crossing of a great river".......Indeed I Thankyou about the Manifesto Info.....Yes, I too have been through alot of this country, chasing down stories and leads, sometimes getting into trouble....Where ever I found stories or locations of Petroglyphs, Pictographs, Associated Carvings, Etchings, Mountain Landmarks (Indian Head) and others, from the vast Libraries on the subject of the Aztecs and other Very Early civilizations that identified certain areas within the area we're talking about, I ran off to seek them, sometimes photographing the sites, and documenting them....Not just exclusively in the Southern California Desert of the Colorado, but all across the American Southwest, parts of the Northwest and also into Mexico proper, many times, sometimes chasing elusive butterfly's, did all this only because of what I found in the Upper Mohave Desert.....Ofcourse the Spanish were here, very early on, that is of no doubt. The History Books that supposedly educates the children in America, are False....when it comes to the early Spanish and Califia...California and many parts of the Southwest...Again I Thankyou......Happy Trails

  4. #19
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    Re: The Pearl Ship

    Greetings Carajou, Real de Tayopa and everyone,

    This is one of the most fascinating and seemingly far-fetched of the many tales of the old southwest. It strikes one as utterly un-believable on first hearing it, and until one can get past the first impression (that it is fiction) to actually investigate the matter it is highly likely you will dismiss the story out of hand.

    I say that because I had that very impression, that this was one of those tales told round the Mahogany Ridge (local alcoholic beverage establishment) for the entertainment and edification of the gullible and/or tourists. It took me several years to even bother to check into it, I had already built such a bias against the story that I did not see any (good) reason to waste time investigating it. However a friend on the desertusa forum convinced me to at least have a look into the matter, and I was slow to come round but now am convinced this is a TRUE tale!

    The fact is, Captain Juan de Iturbe was dispatched to explore the Pacific coast by the king of Spain in 1610 , and to harvest as many pearls as possible while exploring. Iturbe was under command of a Captain Cordone, among a little squadron of three, (forgive any detail errors please, working from memory here as my file cabinets are still in storage – but some day SOON I plan to get into them so could fill in more exacting details) relatively small ships, not the huge Spanish galleons but sloops or brigantines. The report was that Iturbe was quite successful in harvesting pearls, filling the holds of all of his little squadron (or nearly so) and they continued on up the gulf of California searching for a passage round the northern end of California “island” as they expected it to be, based on their best maps of the day. This was the reason why Iturbe sailed up the Colorado river, and when his lookouts spotted a channel of the river flowing to the west, he assumed this must be emptying one mouth of the Colorado river into the northern end of the expected “channel” which would separate California “island” from the mainland, so sailed right into a large body of water with mountains on both shores. Sailing up this “bay” as he thought, he must soon find the north end of California “island” and be able to sail right round it, only to find that the waters grew shallower and shallower as he sailed north! He ordered the ship turned round and they explored the coastline of this “bay” (actually an inland lake formed by a massive flood of the Colorado river which broke through the rather low banks that separate it from the Salton sink) and went up every opening along the shore expecting to find a connection to the Pacific, or at least into another bay which would then connect to the Pacific – and ended up back where he had entered the lake (as he now understood it was) only to find that the Colorado had fallen from its flood stage and it was no longer possible to get back into the gulf of California! He had his ship sail back up the coast of the now-sadly-understood inland lake, growing more desperate by the hour, in a frantic search for any connecting channel or outflow that would allow him to sail back to the Pacific, but another complete circumnavigation of the lake, checking every canyon and opening, failed to find any way to get back to the open sea. In fact they even noticed that the level of the lake waters were receding, while they were in the act of sailing around it.

    With the lake slowly but surely shrinking before their very eyes, Iturbe and his desperate crew sailed their sloop up into a box canyon where it might be somewhat protected (and perhaps could be returned to, to recover the huge haul of pearls as well as valuable porcelain from Chna) and deliberately ran her aground. Offloading the basics they would need for a long over-land trek, and but few pearls, the crew set off to return to civilization. They were eventually successful, and made it back to rejoin their compadres; however the authorities (even then) did not put much faith in Iturbe’s report of having accidentally sailed into a land-locked lake and cast aspersions as to his motives, dark suggestions were made that he had “turned pirate” and hid his gains, which was why he requested another ship to return to the site and recover the load of pearls and other treasure. So they refused to send Iturbe back, but did dispatch another sloop which went to the Colorado river and sailed up it some distance, but did not find any connecting channel into some now-mythical land-locked lake, so returned without Iturbe’s pearls and this cast further doubt on his report. As far as I could find in the old records that was the end of any attempts to recover the “ship of pearls” by Spanish officials.

    During the Anza expedition (1775) from Sonora to California overland to found a new military presidio in California as well as open an overland route to the Spanish colonies in CA, one of the mule drivers of the expedition was sent out on detached service to try to find a water source while the small army (which included the families of the soldiers as well) was crossing the Salton sink. I can’t recall his name, but he could hardly believe his eyes when he walked up a box canyon and spotted the masts of a ship, then the hulk of the ship itself lying half-covered in sands. Out of curiosity he went into the ship and found the hold full of pearls! He loaded as many of the pearls as he could into his pack and decided on the spot to quit de Anza’s expedition, setting off on foot to the California settlements on his own – to sell his new booty and get equipment to return for the rest. He managed to get to the settlements alive, (through the assistance of friendly Indios) and made a fortune from his pearls, then equipped himself to return with an Indian guide as a help-mate. He failed to find the ship!

    There have been quite a number of reports of sightings of this ship, and the exact site is going to be tough to pin down! It may be in Mexico, or it may be in CA – for I found newspaper reports of a man who lived outside of the town of Niland, who had a strange source of Spanish coins in his back yard! According to neighbors, this fellow had dug up something in his back yard that he would disappear into (as if it were some kind of underground chamber) and come out with coins. He never allowed anyone to enter his mysterious underground chamber, but always had plenty of Spanish coins as well as fine porcelain from China, and after a year of mysterious workings in his back yard, left town as a very wealthy man. Did he find the lost ship, buried in his back yard? If it were the pearl ship, why didn’t he turn up with pearls?

    To make matters even more confusing, the Pearl ship is not the ONLY ship believed to be lost in the Salton sink! An English privateer, repeating history, sailed up the Colorado river during a huge flood and found a strange channel flowing west so sailed down it, perhaps expecting to find a new way around California but at any rate ended up very much the same way as Iturbe’s sloop, trapped in a fast-evaporating land-locked lake. This ship would have a great treasure of gold and silver, and almost certainly Chinese porcelain as it had been attacking Spanish galleons on the China trade route. There is another ship that I can’t recall much in the way of details, which was supposedly carried into that same desert basin by a massive tidal wave in the 1800s, which also cast a ship aground near the mouth of the Colorado river at the same instant.

    There is also a ship which was being hauled across the desert which was abandoned when the going got too soft, and was the subject of many curious sighting reports. Even stranger is the fact that the local Indian tribes have legends of ancient ships being trapped in the same region, as has been cited by another post here, BEFORE the arrival of the Europeans! To back this up, there are a handful of reports of sightings which can only be describing a quite ancient ship, either something Norse or Phoenician in origins. There is solid evidence to back these very puzzling reports, in the form of photographs! They have been published in a newspaper but I have not (yet) managed to track them down, nonetheless the description of what is in the photos is of a long, narrow ship, with round metal discs (shields?) along the sides and metal covering the hull, a single old mast still erect, and what appears to be oars along the sides. There were a type of Spanish galleon which was also equipped with oars, but odds are this is a very ancient ship, 1000, 2000 or even more years old. Can wood survive in the desert that long, with the termites and all? Yes, though the wood remaining would be as fragile as Styrofoam.

    Kimimik wrote:
    “Actually the Salton Sea was only formed 100 years ago. The actuall sea never reached that far north. There was an ancient lake that was created by the Colorado River, but it was a fresh water lake and it dried up around 1600. In 1907, a levee broke in Yuma that flooded the Salton Basin and formed the Salton Sea. It is misleading being called a "sea", one would logically assume that it is a remnant of the sea receding, but it isn't. Here is a link to some more information. Hope it helps guide you in the right direction. I suggest that you might want to check out geology sites and research information on the landformations at the time the ship was lost. Don't just go on legends and rumors as I am sure we all have learned, they get us no where. You will find much more success if you look at it scientifically.”

    I beg to differ here – for one, according to a geologist friend of mine, the gulf of California did connect with the Salton sink, but over a thousand years ago the increasing sand deposits of the Colorado river eventually sealed it off. (Check this site:
    http://www.sci.sdsu.edu/salton/Envir...SaltonSea.html
    and
    http://www.waterrights.ca.gov/IID/II...Exhibit_22.pdf

    here is one quote to back this up, quote
    The Salton Basin was once connected to the Gulf of California and was
    characterized by a shallow marine environment (Downs and Woodward 1961). For the
    past several million years, as the Colorado Plateau was uplifted, the sediments that once
    filled the Grand Canyon were deposited in the Gulf of California, eventually building a
    huge delta, blocking off the Salton Basin from the ocean. The deltaic dam is now forty
    feet above sea level, with a drainage divide about 17 miles south of Mexicali, Mexico
    (Dibblee 1954).
    End quote, from TESTIMONY OF DR. TIMOTHY P. KRANTZ, Salton Sea Database Program, University of Redlands, To Be Presented to the State Water Resource Control Board, April 30, 2002

    So not to nit-pick here but the idea that the Salton sink or trough was never connected to the open sea is mistaken; in fact most of the trough remains below sea level even today despite a continuous geologic uplift raising the entire region slowly – the lowest point is over 200 feet below sea level.

    I then must disagree whole-heartedly with this statement: “Don't just go on legends and rumors as I am sure we all have learned, they get us no where. “ – those old legends and myths are pretty much ALL based on facts. I could list a great many instances of successful researchers finding long-lost and long-believed to be mythical ships, treasures and even whole cities, such as the finding of Troy by Schliemann, Helike, the Greek city which suffered the same fate as Atlantis (can't recall the names of the discoverer, but you can find it if you are curious) the Atocha by Mel Fisher (who before his death had recovered over $400 million, and the ship continues to produce still more booty even today) or in lost mines the Tayopa by my friend Real de Tayopa, and many more but this post is already getting really long so will simply point out that by all means execute your search in a scientific manner, be methodical and thorough, but NEVER dismiss those old “legends” as a waste of your time!

    I have never had a chance to search for this most fantastical lost treasure, the Pearl ship of the desert, but (God willing and the crick don’t rise, as they used to say in PA) assuming I don’t get too danged crippled up I plan to some day. So if you are ready to dismiss the whole story and write it off to fiction, heck I won’t mind a bit – it is a certainty then that you won’t find it, and at the very least we won’t be tripping over each other digging in the sands over there! (hee hee)

    Oroblanco

    Remember the wisdom of the ancients…

    There is nothing concealed that will not be disclosed, or hidden that will not be made known. Matthew 10:26 KJV NT

    For there is nothing hidden that will not be disclosed, and nothing concealed that will not be known or brought out into the open. Luke 8:17 KJV NT

    For nothing hidden will not become manifest, and nothing covered will remain without being uncovered. Gospel of Thomas, 11



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  5. #20
    us
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    Re: The Pearl Ship

    Hey Oro,

    I never heard the part about De Anza's man finding it.

    I did find this story while going over some stuff about the Pearl Ship. In about 1907, a desert rat prospector was on his way to Borrego Springs to get some supplies. He was in the Coyote Canyon area just NorthEast of Borrego Spings, when dust storm kicked up. He found some old dead wood sticking up out of the sand, and made a shelter for the night. When the wind died down, he found his mule was dead. He started a fire with some of the dead wood, and spent the night. The next morning, he noticed that the dead wood looked like part of a ship. He started digging around, and found old rotten baskets everywhere fll of pearls. He filled his pockets, and walked the rest of the way into town. He could never find it again either. He lived there for about 20 years looking for that ship.

    Oh! And the reason Iturbide was in the Gulf of Cali was because they had been all up the West Coast. They were full of pearls, and caught a bad storm in the Pacific. One of the galleons was sunk. The last two ships sailed up into the Sea of Cortez for proyection from the storms. When he sailed up the Colorado, he ordered one of the ships to stay behind, in case anything happened to his ship, so they would have a way back to Acapulco. Of the entire crew, only three guys made it to the Gulf (including Iturbide). Some stories say that nobody made it back, and the last ship sailed back to Acapulco sans Iturbide. This is proven untrue, because Spanish Naval Records in Acapulco, show that Iturbide testified about what happened at a hearing into why he lost two of three galleons.

    The guy with the Spanish Coins couldn't be THAT ship. They had no reasons to carry money with them. While the West coast was well explored and named, in 1612 when this happened, there was nowhere to spend money! Below is part of a French Map that was made from a Spanish Map in 1655. Notice every Point and Bay is named, but there are no missions or pueblos shown. Everything on the West Coast are abbreviations for Punto, Bahia, or Isla. Look on Mexico proper, and you will see actual missions and pueblos.
    \
    Best-Mike
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  6. #21
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    Re: The Pearl Ship

    Dang Mike, I never heard of the 1907 incident, and in Coyote Canyon! Heck I tramped around there a couple of decades ago and may have been walking over the danged ship. Now I owe you another cold one, for a great lead in where to start looking, if I can ever get over there to do a hunt.

    I would also like to say I LOVE your map! I like all old maps, especially those with major geographic errors as it really shows the thinking of the day when the map was made. Explains a lot!

    I too think that the fellow who was digging up old spanish coins had not found the pearl ship, but the English privateer. Somewhere in my old notes I had the name of the ship and the captain, date etc but working only from memory just can't pull it up. I can't even do a Google search without either the name of the captain or the ship or even the year, but I do remember it was after the pearl ship.

    Thanks again, cooool map buddy!
    your friend,
    Roy - Oroblanco
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  7. #22
    us
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    Re: The Pearl Ship

    Hey Oro,

    Then you will love this! The Library of Congress has tons of old maps digitized, and online for freeeeeeee!

    Go to this website (it is Library of Congresses map site):

    http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/gmdhtml/gmdhome.html

    You will have to download a special viewer to see the maps (but that's free too)! Go to the "Discovery and Exploration Section.

    Best,

    Mike
    "You wouldn't like me when I'm mad, because I back up my rage with hard facts and logic!" - The Credible Hulk

    ............... ALWAYS REMEMBER: When you make a typo, the errorists win...................Aloha Snackbar!

  8. #23

    Jun 2006
    SoCal
    11

    Re: The Pearl Ship

    Kool stuff....love that free map site!!

    Most of the details outlined in this post including the tale of DeAnza'a muleteer can be found in Eugene Conrotto's book Lost Gold and Silver Mines of the Southwest. Additionally it contains excerpts from a January, 1939 Desert magazine article by Charles Niehuis in which one Perta Socia Tucker was interviewed concerning the ship. Evidently her first husband knew of the ships location (why he was still poor is somewhat of a paradox) and described it to her as "...a narrow box canyon with high sheer walls, and a sandy bottom; and partially buried there, a boat of ancient appearance - an open boat but big, with round metal disks on its sides." She went on to say... "one time my husband, Santiago, was riding in the mountains in the Estados, and I was with him. We were up high, and could see more mountains, 15, maybe 20 miles away, and he say: 'Perta, I am a poor man now, and maybe some time I die before you and leave nothing. You get a good man, and come back here. You go to those mountains, the ship, it is there'."

    Sounds like she could have been up in the Jacumba Wilderness looking north to the Fish Mountains. Definitely north of the border at any rate.

    Shadowed_Blue

  9. #24
    us
    Aug 2005
    Warrenton, VA
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    Re: The Pearl Ship

    Blue,
    wasn't that story supposedly about a Viking longship that he had found? He told her that he could have brought her a metal pan for working cornmeal if he had had a chisel to pry it off the ship.
    When I google "Viking longship in desert" the story comes up.
    grizzly bare

  10. #25
    mx
    Nov 2004
    Alamos,Sonora,Mexico
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    Re: The Pearl Ship

    HIO, K guys fill me in. Too lazy this morning to do the research.

    How many oysters need to be harvested on an average for a Pearl in the Mar de Cortez?

    For a ship to be loaded with them would require a fantastic amount of Oysters, no?

    Where did he manage to recruit or take with him that many divers?

    How long must it have taken to accumulate them?

    A trunk full of pearls of any quality would represent a huge fortune, a ship load?.

    I do know that Pearl shell had a great value then, is it conceivable that much of the cargo was Oyster Pearl shell?

    Curious, since I have never really researched this project, but what little information that I have, places it below Mexicali in the sand dune area. Perhaps in the Pinacate area?.

    This is an excellent project since initially, it would not require much operating capital.

    Tropical Tramp
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  11. #26
    us
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    Re: The Pearl Ship

    Quote Originally Posted by RealdeTayopa
    HIO, K guys fill me in. Too lazy this morning to do the research.

    How many oysters need to be harvested on an average for a Pearl in the Mar de Cortez?

    For a ship to be loaded with them would require a fantastic amount of Oysters, no?

    Where did he manage to recruit or take with him that many divers?

    How long must it have taken to accumulate them?

    A trunk full of pearls of any quality would represent a huge fortune, a ship load?.

    I do know that Pearl shell had a great value then, is it conceivable that much of the cargo was Oyster Pearl shell?

    Curious, since I have never really researched this project, but what little information that I have, places it below Mexicali in the sand dune area. Perhaps in the Pinacate area?.

    This is an excellent project since initially, it would not require much operating capital.

    Tropical Tramp
    Hey Jose,

    They didn't get all the pearls in the Sea of Cortez. The stoies I have read say they travelled all up and down the West Coast. They traded crap with the Indians for the pearls they had.

    Nobody knows for sure where the ship wound up, but it's location could not be too close to the current boundaries of the Sea of Cortez, because an integral part of the story is most of the crew died walking back to the Sea to the last galleon. If they only had to walk 30 or 40 miles, there was probably plenty of water and food on the ship for that short a hike. And also the story goes that it took them about two weeks to get back.

    Best,

    Mike
    "You wouldn't like me when I'm mad, because I back up my rage with hard facts and logic!" - The Credible Hulk

    ............... ALWAYS REMEMBER: When you make a typo, the errorists win...................Aloha Snackbar!

  12. #27
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    Re: The Pearl Ship

    Mike what you have read is very much in agreement with what I read - that they had their own divers (according to one source Africans, according to another, Japanese) but had much better success in trading with Indios for pearls. They seem to have bragged of trading rotten biscuits for pearls, which probably did not do much for future relations!

    As to exactly how much of a load of pearls we are talking about here, we can only speculate. However some folks seem to get a mistaken idea of a huge Spanish galleon, with a hold capacity of hundreds of tons, when this was not the case. The ship was (if memory serves) purpose-built on the coast of Mexico just before the voyage, with a shallow draught so as to be able to put ashore if needed; now I am no expert on ships of the day but if I remember right the ship was what we would call a "sloop" or brigantine, (two different types of relatively small ships) and would not have a particularly huge carrying capacity in the holds. So we may be talking about a treasure of a mass of pearls, but in bushels not in metric tons. We also know that many Amerindian tribes obtained pearls by putting the oysters in a fire, which cracked them open easily but pretty much ruined the pearls for europeans. Could the load have been oyster-shell instead of pearls? Of course it could, but the report of Iturbide was pretty clear in claiming it was pearls, plus the one surviving vessel of the voyage had a nice haul of pearls so the evidence suggests Iturbide was telling the truth.

    Is the ship north or south of the border? Boy that is one good question! They supposedly sailed north to 34 degrees latitude, which is well north of the border, but if I remember right they also sailed round the perimeter of the lake looking for any kind of channel to escape so could be literally anywhere along the edge of it. It seems logical they would have traveled as far south as possible before deliberately beaching it, so as to shorten their hike out to the sea - but Iturbide was also concerned about a hiding place for the ship to prevent someone else spotting it and taking the treasure which was why he chose a canyon to beach it. That means the canyon could be pretty much anywhere around the shore of the fast-vanishing lake, though I would doubt it would be so far as 34 degrees north, we also know that it took them more than one day or two days of hiking to get out to the gulf so...just theorizing here but I don't think it is safe to say the old boat is absolutely north OR south of the border based on what we have.

    The modern day sightings place it in a narrow box canyon and quite close to the border. This seems odd because there are roads, homes etc in that area but who knows? I sure have never seen it so can't say where it is. Actually I am curious as to whether pearls will decay or not? I realize pearls in a jewelry box won't decay, but what about pearls buried in the ground? If the ground is only slightly acidic, over time the pearls may well just dissolve into the soil - after all we know that a pearl will disappear in a glass of vinegar. So the possibility exists that unless someone can locate and recover this treasure, it may end up being nothing but a white calcification on some old rotted timbers and rust stains in the sands. I sure hope someone does find it, before it is truly gone forever though.

    Oroblanco
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  13. #28
    Miss

    Sep 2006
    california
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    california desert lore

    Re: The Pearl Ship

    This is my favorite legend oroblanco is essentially correct in his facts If the ship was one of Iturbes
    and not a Rus (Russian Vikings), Chinese or Arabian Vessel

    On lost lakes, one of The problem is there are two. when ever the colorado formed the ancient Cahilla lake
    the outflow of that lake would spill over into Lake Maquata (aka Laguna salada area).
    Lake Maquata has had inflows from both the ocean and the colorado since the 1860s
    so it could have been either an branch of the ocean or a freshwater lake in 1615.

    for sailing ships trying to determine Longitude in 1615, it was a guess work, closest estimate kind of thing

    Iturbe who worked for the Cardona's cartel which had the pearl fishing rights to the Americas in 1615
    had his ships purpose built in Acapulco. if his ships were similar (and may have been the same ships)
    to those used in the 1615 expedition up the California gulf. then we can get an estimate of their size from
    the Journal of dutch admiral (or pirate) Joris Von Spielbergen who captured the largest ship of the 1615
    voyage. he described it as more of a fishing boat than a ship of war and he used the small ship as a tender
    in the Philippines. he also left a drawing of the small captured ship floating next to his Fleet of large galleons
    Iturbe had Negro slaves purchased from the pearling areas of the nearly depleted Caribbean pearl beds and brought overland. There are also indications that in 1615 the cardona cartel was using some form of a diving bell. we know for sure Iturbe had a two man bell in 1632. The pearl beds of California were at the time of his arrival pretty much untouched. they also were at the time the only known source of Black pearls.

    as a side thing I have been searching on-line listings of European royal jewels for mentions of black pearls before
    the discovery of Tahiti. I think some of those Iturbe brought back wound up with Catherine the great.
    (The recent Disney movie has cluttered the search keyword criteria horribly)

    there is also a painting of a unknown girl wearing a black pearl pendant, painted circa 1615 in one of the balboa park museums in San Diego. I saw it, when I was busy with something else and only realized it later.
    I haven't been able to get back to ask about it.

    Walter Nordhoff (aka Antonio DE Fierro Blanco) in his book Journey of the flame writes of an De Anza Muleteer who claimed the pearls
    I think it was Choral Pepper who wrote of Johansen? a farmer who used wood from the nearby ship to build a fence for his pigs and maybe took a chest of jewels to be sold in L.A.

    Several Very recent versions of ship stories mention people taking or having wood from what was left of the ship

  14. #29
    um
    Nemo me impune lacesset

    Jan 2005
    DAKOTA TERRITORY
    Tesoro Lobo Supertraq, (95%) Garrett Scorpion (5%)
    7,597
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    Re: The Pearl Ship

    Greetings Isayhello2u and welcome to Treasurenet! I had read your post in another thread but did not notice that you had only recently joined.

    This tale of the Pearl ship is one of the most fascinating tales of the American southwest in my opinion, with good reasons to believe it is true. I have never gone out searching for it personally, but have seriously considered it and may yet get a chance to some day.

    One thing about this treasure has been bothering me for some time - would the pearls survive in the ground? I know that pearls will dissolve in vinegar a mild acid, and we know that most western soils are either slightly acidic or slightly alkali, either of which may be corrosive to pearls which are basically calcium carbonate. As long as the ship remained relatively intact the pearls would be protected to a certain degree, but as the wood rots/deteriorates/gets eaten by termites, the pearls would be exposed to the elements more and more over time. True it is desert which gets little rain but it DOES get rains, and the soil holds the moisture for considerably longer than the surface so...I fear that if the pearl ship is not found sooner rather than later, the pearls may be dissolving away into nothing but a white stain in the soils!

    Isayhello2u, if you were going to go look for the Pearl ship, where would your first choice spot be? (If you would rather not say I will understand.) Thank you in advance and again welcome to T-net!
    Roy ~ Oroblanco

    "Who are you going to believe, me or your own eyes?" --Groucho Marx
    SUPPORT THE BEEF INDUSTRY - EAT BEEF
    "We must find a way, or we will make one."--Hannibal Barca

  15. #30
    us
    Fortune Favors the BOLD, while Karma Favors the Wise!

    Jan 2006
    Arizona Vagrant
    Modded SD2000 / Fisher FX-3 / Fisher Gold Bug II / Fisher Gemini / Schiebel MIMID
    6,585
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    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Re: The Pearl Ship

    Hey,

    I just noticed a mistake I made in a previous post about this. Coyote canyon is North WEST of Borrego Springs (not NorthEast).

    Mike
    "You wouldn't like me when I'm mad, because I back up my rage with hard facts and logic!" - The Credible Hulk

    ............... ALWAYS REMEMBER: When you make a typo, the errorists win...................Aloha Snackbar!

 

 
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