History of Schuylkill County Pa
Welcome guest, is this your first visit?
Member
Discoveries
 
Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    us
    Oct 2005
    Schuylkill County,PA
    Whites MXT, Garrett 250, Bounty Hunter
    139
    3 times

    History of Schuylkill County Pa

    In 1776 the people of the province of Pennsylvania threw off the proprietary government and adopted a state constitution; then, by a series of acts the last of which was passed January 28th, 1779, the estates of the proprietaries under the charter were vested in the commonwealth, and the feudal relation which the charter created was entirely sundered. This act was similar in its character to the Declaration of Independence, and like that declaration its force depended on the success of the Revolution. It appears that manorial lands had been held and sold in this county prior to the Revolution, and that individuals had acquired titles to ether lands from the proprietaries; but the titles to most of the lands in the county were obtained from the State by procuring warrants directed to the surveyor general and by him transmitted to the deputy-surveyor of the district, authorizing a survey of the lands described in the applications for the warrants. On the return of these warrants and compliance with all the prescribed conditions patents or letters patent (open letters) were granted, conveying the title in fee simple to the patentee. This has been the usual method of acquiring titles from the State. It is hardly necessary to speak of titles acquired by location, by settlement or by improvement. Warrants were not granted to one person at the same time for larger tracts than four hundred acres, but to evade this regulation, speculators often made applications for lands in different names and made the necessary transfers afterward, thus acquiring titles to large tracts.

    Before the mineral wealth that lies beneath the surface here was known many lands were sold for arrears of taxes. Of these some that were purchased at two or three cents per acre have now a value per acre of $1,000 or more.

    When the first settlers penetrated the region north from the Blue mountain, or who those settlers were, is not known. It has always been true that the pioneers of civilization have pushed forward in advance of treaties, and located at their own peril where advantages of soil, climate, or other circumstances served to invite. The region south from Blue mountain, now Berks county, had many settlers previous to the extinguishment of the Indian title in 1736, and that portion of Schuylkill between Blue and Second mountains is known to have been settled by many whites before its purchase in 1749. Early in that year a grand council of the Six Nations at Onondaga had a deputation of chiefs from each of these nations go to Philadelphia and represent, among other things, that settlements had been made by the whites on this side of the Blue mountain. They said: "As our boundaries are so well known and so remarkably distinguished by a high range of mountains we could not suppose this could be done by mistake; but either it must be done wickedly, by bad people, without the knowledge

    of the governor, or the new governor has brought some instructions from the king or the proprietaries relating to this affair whereby we are to be much hurt. The gov ernor will be pleased to tell us whether he has brought any orders from the king or proprietaries for these people to settle our lands; and if not we earnestly desire that they be made to remove instantly, with all their effects, to prevent the sad consequences which will otherwise ensue."

    North from Second mountain there was nothing then to invite settlement. The existence of coal was not known. No demand had arisen for the lumber which that region was capable of affording, and the surface was too rugged and mountainous for successful agriculture. Here and there might be found the solitary cabin of an adventurous hunter, whom the abundance of game had attracted hither, but nothing more.

    Of the early settlers in that part of Schuylkill county south from Second mountain it is known that George Godfried Orwig and Glora, his wife, had come from Germany in 1747 and settled at Sculp Hill, a short distance south from Orwigsburg, which was founded by Peter Orwig, a son of this pioneer couple, in 1796. Some of the descendants of this family still reside in the region. Of other early settlers it is known that Thomas Reed came as early as 1750, a family named Yeager about 1762, and that Martin Dreibelbis had erected a saw-mill and grist-mill at what is now Schuylkill Haven just before the Revolution.

    But one dwelling house is known to have been erected in the last century in what are now the coal districts of the county. This was the log house of a Mr. Neiman, whose family was massacred by the Indians about the close of the Revolution. A saw-mill was erected at Pottsville prior to 1800, and another near St. Clair by George Orwig. This was operated without the establishment of a residence there. Provisions for a week were taken to the mill by the workmen, who were thus enabled to manufacture all the lumber which the exigencies of the times required. Probably other mills were built and operated in the same way.

    As before stated, the population north from Blue mountain was very sparse at the time of the Revolutionary war, and no revolutionary history of the region is preserved. There are traditions of a few Indian murders and massacres, which are noticed in the histories of the localities where they occurred; but aside from these the region which Schuylkill county includes was not the theatre of hostile operations. What was termed the " Tory path " traversed the county from southeast to northwest. Possibly it may have been an old Indian trail, but its name is suggestive of its use during the Revolution.

    In the war of 1812 Schuylkill was represented in the armies of the country by many recruits, but accurate lists of them cannot now be obtained.

    There is about 500 pages

    http://books.google.com/books?id=fyc...t#PRA1-PA73,M1

    More about the massacre

    http://books.google.com/books?id=eio...sult#PPA159,M1

  2. #2
    us
    Jan 2009
    Hegins Pennsylvania
    62
    2 times

    Re: History of Schuylkill County Pa

    Wow, I'm from schuylkill and did'nt know that history. Nice informative post.

  3. #3
    us
    Sep 2008
    Tamaqua Pa
    V3i
    493
    68 times

    Re: History of Schuylkill County Pa

    Pretty cool read, more info the better. That would make sense on how the blue was the divider, I wonder if it was the divider all the way north, like through palmerton and on?

  4. #4
    us
    #DirtGangPA

    Apr 2008
    Pottsville, PA
    Garrett Ace 400, Nel Tornando, Garrett Carrot PinPointer
    178
    55 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Re: History of Schuylkill County Pa

    good ole schuylkill

  5. #5

    Dec 2003
    Porter Township, Western Schuylkill County, Pa.
    2 MINELAB EXPLORER SE PRO's .......3 Garrett Pro Pointers…… Sovereign XS-2 Pro ....... 2 Sovereign GT's
    73,231
    40780 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Honorable Mentions (1)

    Re: History of Schuylkill County Pa

    Quote Originally Posted by CuDdLeS17981


    Of the early settlers in that part of Schuylkill county south from Second mountain it is known that George Godfried Orwig and Glora, his wife, had come from Germany in 1747 and settled at Sculp Hill, a short distance south from Orwigsburg, which was founded by Peter Orwig, a son of this pioneer couple, in 1796. Some of the descendants of this family still reside in the region. Of other early settlers it is known that Thomas Reed came as early as 1750, a family named Yeager about 1762, and that Martin Dreibelbis had erected a saw-mill and grist-mill at what is now Schuylkill Haven just before the Revolution.


    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	!_D.jpg 
Views:	455 
Size:	155.8 KB 
ID:	263276

    This house along the north side of the blue Mountain
    Dates to 1700. (At least Part of the first Floor Does.)
    May be Gun Port Top Right
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	!_1700.jpg 
Views:	314 
Size:	30.0 KB 
ID:	263277

    This one N.w. of it.
    1770

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	!BN007035.jpg 
Views:	310 
Size:	33.0 KB 
ID:	263278


    1788
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	!DE006009.jpg 
Views:	293 
Size:	50.6 KB 
ID:	263279


    1780
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	!DL004015.jpg 
Views:	289 
Size:	26.2 KB 
ID:	263280


    some Unknown places of Intrest

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	!!NZ009029.jpg 
Views:	295 
Size:	88.2 KB 
ID:	263281

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	!!BG006011.jpg 
Views:	285 
Size:	38.0 KB 
ID:	263282

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	!!JK009040.jpg 
Views:	313 
Size:	69.3 KB 
ID:	263283

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	!!CO009019.jpg 
Views:	286 
Size:	48.1 KB 
ID:	263284


    1750
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	!!!BI006030.jpg 
Views:	281 
Size:	42.6 KB 
ID:	263285

 

 

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

1700s settle in schuylkill county
,

early schuylkill county history

,

ginseng in schuylkill county

,
history of sculps hill schuylkill county
,
indian facts schuylkill county
,
is there ginseng in schuylkill county
,
orwigsburg, schuylkill county, early settlers
,

schuylkill county ginseng

,
schuylkill county indians
,
what was the nationality of the first people to settle in sch. county, pa.
Click on a term to search for related topics.
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.3.0