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  1. #211
    us
    Jan 2019
    Maine
    473
    549 times
    Prospecting
    Quote Originally Posted by placertogo View Post
    If you happen to be in an area where removal of moss is not allowed, wait until after the water has receded and the moss has dried out, use a portable cordless vacuum to remove the dry dirt from the moss, leaving the moss in place. You will recover most of the retained gold that way.
    I am not sure, as I have never looked into that particular law.

    Do you know if the removal of moss is based on designation of a stream status, or is it just in individual streams, or streams included in a given watershed?

  2. #212
    us
    Aug 2010
    Maine USA
    368
    349 times

    The Quest for Maine Gold

    Quote Originally Posted by OreCart View Post
    I am not sure, as I have never looked into that particular law.

    Do you know if the removal of moss is based on designation of a stream status, or is it just in individual streams, or streams included in a given watershed?
    According to Title 38 MRSA Section 480-q "5. Gold panning. Notwithstanding section 480-C, a permit shall not be required for panning gold, provided that stream banks are not disturbed and no unlicensed discharge is created;" it basically says we cannot disturb "stream banks" so I would say unless the moss is on a bank, we are okay. The moss which carries most of the gold is on boulders which are within the travel of the stream during high water and are high and dry after the water has receded. It is generally accepted you can remove or disturb cobbles which are within the stream bed. In some streams, nearly all of the cobbles are covered by moss. The intent of the law is clearly to not remove vegetation which retains the integrity of the stream banks. So we wait for a good flood and then it is the water, not the prospector, which erodes the stream banks.
    Last edited by placertogo; May 22, 2019 at 09:26 AM.

  3. #213
    us
    Jan 2019
    Maine
    473
    549 times
    Prospecting
    Quote Originally Posted by placertogo View Post
    According to Title 38 MRSA Section 480-q "5. Gold panning. Notwithstanding section 480-C, a permit shall not be required for panning gold, provided that stream banks are not disturbed and no unlicensed discharge is created;" it basically says we cannot disturb "stream banks" so I would say unless the moss is on a bank, we are okay. The moss which carries most of the gold is on boulders which are within the travel of the stream during high water and are high and dry after the water has receded. It is generally accepted you can remove or disturb cobbles which are within the stream bed. In some streams, nearly all of the cobbles are covered by moss. The intent of the law is clearly to not remove vegetation which retains the integrity of the stream banks. So we wait for a good flood and then it is the water, not the prospector, which erodes the stream banks.
    Or just say that the Moose must have licked off the moss! :-)

    Of course in Maine, the only way you can tell the women-folk from moose is that the former wear plaid! If you do not believe me, you should see my ex-wife! (Katie is a bit different, she looks pretty good in her plaid miniskirt, but only if you like the Naughty School Girl look!) LOL

    I have used your same methodology to skirt land clearing laws before. I can do anything I want if it is in regards to logging, but if the land is to be used for farming, stumps cannot be removed in forested wetlands.

    So I logged off all the hardwood, and pushed the stumps out...for logging roads of course, but left only the big softwoods...big hemlock in this case. But with clear-cut all around, the wind slammed into those big trees now catching all the wind, and soon the were blown over by the wind and uprooted. The laws on recovering "windfalls" goes back to antiquity, so that is allowed. Nope: I never stumped the area, the wind did!
    Jimoutside likes this.

  4. #214
    us
    Jan 2019
    Maine
    473
    549 times
    Prospecting
    I take a lot of pictures when I am out and about, but of course do not always post them.

    This particular stream is in some really old growth forest. It is about 2 miles from the nearest road, so it makes logging tough, but I did log that area back in 1994. It is hard to make money pulling wood that far, but it was good wood, making it profitable. I snapped a lot of main cables trying to get all the wood I could on behind the skidder though. But all that old growth really makes for some moss, not to mention being on the Northeast side of the mountain.


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    Jimoutside likes this.

  5. #215
    us
    Jan 2019
    Maine
    473
    549 times
    Prospecting
    I guess technically this is a Non-Update because I have nothing to report.

    My interest in searching for Gold has not wavered, but after some serious decision making, Katie and I decided that we wanted to free up some cash. Katie and I are both "givers", and lately with everything just sitting, we have not really been able to help our community out like we used to. Property taxes are killing us, and we want to do some vacations as a family before our kids leave the nest, so we decided to sell two of our houses.

    Selling one is bad enough, but two means a "lot of polishing", so I have been just inundated with doing odd jobs to get things ready to sell. So I have just not had time to go out looking for where the gold is.

    Hopefully they will sell pretty quick, and I can resume the search, maybe even investing in some equipment to start getting the gold out of the ground. Mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm...wash plant! :-)
    Last edited by OreCart; Jun 04, 2019 at 06:11 PM.

  6. #216
    us
    Jan 2019
    Maine
    473
    549 times
    Prospecting
    Between ground work and fixing up houses to sell, I have not been out in the woods a lot. My father in law has been here a few times, but we never got out as we had kids birthday parties to go to and stuff. It got some interest in the houses, so that is good.

    But that does not mean I am not doing anything gold wise.

    I decided if I had no time to get more samples, the least I could do was get more testing done of the samples I do have. So, in the interest of finding out what site location had for other mineralization, I sent in a bunch of samples and was rather shocked at what I found.

    I should have a Zinc Mine here!

    My samples came back on 3/4 of the sites I have tested so far to be two hundred times higher than average. 200 TIMES!

    But some other surprising things came out of the testing. Copper is elevated, but not as much as I thought it would be, and yet almost no lead. Iron was also close to 200 times higher than average, so this leads me to conclude what I had thought was Galena, is actually Wurtzite. That would explain the high iron content, and yet lack of lead, and mid-range sulfur levels. I suppose this should not have shocked me, the garnet I have been finding is black in color; the black coming from titanium making the garnet Ilmenite, so the mineralization here is on the zinc-iron side of things.

    Again, this should not be a huge surprise. As a farmer I have been clearing forest into field in a pretty big way (100 acres), and noted that the soil was red. This indicates two things according to the USDA wetland expert. The soil has a LOT of iron in it, and the forest was old growth forest. If it had been a field at one time, or even pasture, the iron would have been stirred up and the iron previously rusted away. What happens is, as I log and the feller-buncher and skidder tires churn up the soil, all that iron begins to rust, and turns red.

    All this is good news. Zinc and Iron are indicators of gold.

    Zinc however has cadmium too, which my samples are not being tested for. Considering my two bouts with Brain and Thyroid Cancer, I think I will check to see if I have any of that lurking around.
    DizzyDigger and Jimoutside like this.

  7. #217
    us
    May 2009
    Sailor Flat, Ca.
    SDC2300, Gold Bug 2 Burlap, fish oil, ACME handbook for TRUE prospectors (unread)
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    above the water table is the oxidization zone.

    the soil doesn't have to be disturbed to turn red if it is high in iron.

    does the redness not go much below the surface?
    Clay Diggins and Jimoutside like this.

  8. #218
    us
    Jan 2019
    Maine
    473
    549 times
    Prospecting
    Quote Originally Posted by Goldwasher View Post
    above the water table is the oxidization zone.

    the soil doesn't have to be disturbed to turn red if it is high in iron.

    does the redness not go much below the surface?
    You only see the redness where the soil is churned up, and it takes a few weeks to show up. Like if I go and spin the feller-buncher around, it just looks like dirt where the tracks spun up the soil, but then a few weeks later, it is all red.

    I originally thought it was the tannins in the hemlock bark because there is a lot of Eastern Hemlock here, but the USDA Wetland Expert said it was from the iron and rusting.

    But I trust you over him.

    He also told me "the soil would be about 15 feet deep here". That was interesting because the grousers on the feller-buncher are 3 inches high and I was pounding over ledgerock on most of this stand (40 acres). The soil on this hill is THIN, when I plow with a 16 inch plow, the resets just quiver because 90% of the time the plowshares are riding on top of ledge.

    He also noted "wetland" in places, but the thing was, I bulldozed a road into the stand in 1994. The water had no where to run, so it pooled up. It was not wetland at all, it was a logging road that had no drainage.

    These USDA guys are interesting though. I live on a 6% grade, and they came out to build me a "covered, heavy use area with end walls". Now that is something you and I call a BARN. Anyway they had to test the soil for drainage. So they send out the USDA State Soil Engineer. He looks the site over and sees the only level spot around and announces that is where the barn should go. (I do not say anything). He then gets out a shovel and starts smiling, pats me on my back and says, "you should start a gravel pit here. Its all gravel." (I say nothing).

    Now I am pretty dumb, but when I go to a place and it is sloped all around, and then in a small spot it is level, I just ASSUME that is the houses leach field.

    And also while I admit I am just a dumb farmer and did not go to college for 8 years like he did, I sure can tell the difference between rock tumbled and rounded over by a glacier naturally, from that of 1-1/2 minus rock broken by a gyro-crusher! I wonder what the blooming idiot would have thought if his shovel had hit one of my plastic sewer pipes? (I said nothing in any case; they know more than I do apparently).
    Clay Diggins and Jimoutside like this.

  9. #219
    us
    Aug 2010
    Maine USA
    368
    349 times
    Quote Originally Posted by OreCart View Post
    You only see the redness where the soil is churned up, and it takes a few weeks to show up. Like if I go and spin the feller-buncher around, it just looks like dirt where the tracks spun up the soil, but then a few weeks later, it is all red.

    I originally thought it was the tannins in the hemlock bark because there is a lot of Eastern Hemlock here, but the USDA Wetland Expert said it was from the iron and rusting.

    But I trust you over him.

    He also told me "the soil would be about 15 feet deep here". That was interesting because the grousers on the feller-buncher are 3 inches high and I was pounding over ledgerock on most of this stand (40 acres). The soil on this hill is THIN, when I plow with a 16 inch plow, the resets just quiver because 90% of the time the plowshares are riding on top of ledge.

    He also noted "wetland" in places, but the thing was, I bulldozed a road into the stand in 1994. The water had no where to run, so it pooled up. It was not wetland at all, it was a logging road that had no drainage.

    These USDA guys are interesting though. I live on a 6% grade, and they came out to build me a "covered, heavy use area with end walls". Now that is something you and I call a BARN. Anyway they had to test the soil for drainage. So they send out the USDA State Soil Engineer. He looks the site over and sees the only level spot around and announces that is where the barn should go. (I do not say anything). He then gets out a shovel and starts smiling, pats me on my back and says, "you should start a gravel pit here. Its all gravel." (I say nothing).

    Now I am pretty dumb, but when I go to a place and it is sloped all around, and then in a small spot it is level, I just ASSUME that is the houses leach field.

    And also while I admit I am just a dumb farmer and did not go to college for 8 years like he did, I sure can tell the difference between rock tumbled and rounded over by a glacier naturally, from that of 1-1/2 minus rock broken by a gyro-crusher! I wonder what the blooming idiot would have thought if his shovel had hit one of my plastic sewer pipes? (I said nothing in any case; they know more than I do apparently).
    What is known as “bog iron” was fairly common in Maine. Katahdin Iron Works used this bog iron for its smelting ore. My ancestor Joseph Jenks was hired as forgemaster in the 1640’s by the Leonard family who owned Saugus Iron Works in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. They used bog iron ore from various sites in Essex County, Massachusetts.
    Clay Diggins and Jimoutside like this.

  10. #220
    us
    Jan 2019
    Maine
    473
    549 times
    Prospecting
    Quote Originally Posted by placertogo View Post
    What is known as “bog iron” was fairly common in Maine. Katahdin Iron Works used this bog iron for its smelting ore. My ancestor Joseph Jenks was hired as forgemaster in the 1640’s by the Leonard family who owned Saugus Iron Works in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. They used bog iron ore from various sites in Essex County, Massachusetts.
    I do not know much about bog iron or Katadin iron Works, although my family is from there. In fact that is where my Great-Great Grandfather was murdered. In his case, it was over timber-theft as he was a Foreman for the Great Northern Paper Company who owned the wood on that site when he was murdered. I have his diary and the last month leading up to his murder, he was pursuing legal action against the timber-thieves.

    The timber-thieves got away with murder though, citing it was a hunting accident, but the man's diary spelled out murder.

    I have been there many times, but that is about all I know.

    I tried my hand as making charcoal last year (like they did up there), but failed miserably. In my case, my wood either burned to ash, or did not burn at all. No charcoal was really made! :-(
    DizzyDigger and Jimoutside like this.

  11. #221

    Mar 2016
    2,861
    4530 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    How are things going?

    When I was in high school there was an old 90 year old blacksmith that volunteered his time teaching the kids his trade.
    Wish I had been more mature back then.

    He would make charcoal from mesquite brush. He'd dig a hole in the sand and fill it with chunks of brush, then bury it with damp sand. I remember I had Ag. Class first period and we'd always start the forge up early in the morning and stand around it to keep warm. He was always in a bad mood in the morning and now I know why. We were wasting the charcoal he took so much time making!!
    Jimoutside likes this.
    This Communication HEREBY Serves as OFFICIAL NOTICE That All Messages in This Thread Have Been REVIEWED. FURTHERMORE, All Messages of Positive Nature SHALL IRREVOCABLY Be Considered "LIKED" INSOFAR as Applicable to This Forum. FINALLY, All Discrimination is Strictly PROHIBITED.

  12. #222
    us
    George

    Jun 2019
    Ak,Tn
    Minelab, Fisher
    378
    724 times
    Prospecting
    Pyrites are faceted but why don't you have some samples assayed......

  13. #223
    us
    Jan 2019
    New York
    26
    31 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Crush it and send it to your father-in-law. also send him samples of your crushed gravel as well. This would definitely be the way to go. Then you can plan for the next stage of your operation. Always remember that prospecting means to be in search of something. You will need several samples from different places along the out crop so that you can determine where the pay dirt is best. My other suggestion would be to visit the YouTube channel and Facebook page of Dan Hurd Prospecting for more information. He is also very helpful. Good luck and Gods Speed.
    "There is no learning without witnessing"

  14. #224
    us
    Distractable Specialist

    Jul 2019
    South Carolina
    60
    52 times
    Prospecting
    Wow. I just took a couple hours and read this entire thread. I couldn't stop.

    I grew up in Clinton, Maine, and the things you relate in this thread brought back so many memories. My mom grew up in North Belgrade. Her mother was from China, Maine, and her father was from Belgrade on Route 11. My dad's mother's family was from Houlton--she was a Barton, one of the big families up there in potato land.

    My dad grew up in Oregon, but they moved to Maine to be near my mom's parents before I was born. Later, I went to college in South Carolina. After moving back and forth several times, my wife and I ended up staying down here, for the last 15 years.

    My mom's father's family was one of the old Maine families going back to colonial days. In fact ancestors on all four quarters of my family came in through colonial Massachusetts and Maine, including some on the Mayflower. I grew up in the gravel/logging/dairy town of Clinton. As a young adult, I worked for a while on the largest dairy farm in the state. My dad was a machinist and later a newspaper man. Both my parents worked for the Waterville Morning Sentinel newspaper, and then my dad worked for the Kennebec Journal in Augusta until he took early retirement. My parents moved to western Kentucky in 2010. I have relatives in Vassalboro, Albion, and Waterville even now.

    My dad and I logged firewood and pulp with his 1948 John Deere B, and sometimes used whichever dozer he had at the time to help. He had an International TD-6, then later a Cat D-6, then a D-4. Newest of which I think was 1959. I learned to drive the old tractors with hand clutches and so on at a young age. My cousin now has a dairy farm and sawmill in Albion.

    I'm glad to hear about your centuries-old farm that has been in the family so long. Also hope you do well with treatment for your cancer. Also glad you're a Christian, and believe strongly.

    I'll be gladly listening for more updates of your account here. Thanks for sharing it with us.

    Jim

  15. #225
    us
    Aug 2010
    Maine USA
    368
    349 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Jimoutside View Post
    Wow. I just took a couple hours and read this entire thread. I couldn't stop.

    I grew up in Clinton, Maine, and the things you relate in this thread brought back so many memories. My mom grew up in North Belgrade. Her mother was from China, Maine, and her father was from Belgrade on Route 11. My dad's mother's family was from Houlton--she was a Barton, one of the big families up there in potato land.

    My dad grew up in Oregon, but they moved to Maine to be near my mom's parents before I was born. Later, I went to college in South Carolina. After moving back and forth several times, my wife and I ended up staying down here, for the last 15 years.

    My mom's father's family was one of the old Maine families going back to colonial days. In fact ancestors on all four quarters of my family came in through colonial Massachusetts and Maine, including some on the Mayflower. I grew up in the gravel/logging/dairy town of Clinton. As a young adult, I worked for a while on the largest dairy farm in the state. My dad was a machinist and later a newspaper man. Both my parents worked for the Waterville Morning Sentinel newspaper, and then my dad worked for the Kennebec Journal in Augusta until he took early retirement. My parents moved to western Kentucky in 2010. I have relatives in Vassalboro, Albion, and Waterville even now.

    My dad and I logged firewood and pulp with his 1948 John Deere B, and sometimes used whichever dozer he had at the time to help. He had an International TD-6, then later a Cat D-6, then a D-4. Newest of which I think was 1959. I learned to drive the old tractors with hand clutches and so on at a young age. My cousin now has a dairy farm and sawmill in Albion.

    I'm glad to hear about your centuries-old farm that has been in the family so long. Also hope you do well with treatment for your cancer. Also glad you're a Christian, and believe strongly.

    I'll be gladly listening for more updates of your account here. Thanks for sharing it with us.

    Jim
    Did you have to start those old dozers with a pony engine?

 

 
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