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Thread: Was Revolutionary War hero Casimir Pulaski actually a WOMAN?

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  1. #1
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    Was Revolutionary War hero Casimir Pulaski actually a WOMAN?

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...ly-female.html

    By Emily Crane For Dailymail.com and Chris Dyer For Mailonline

    Published: 01:45 EDT, 4 April 2019 | Updated: 12:28 EDT, 4 April 2019

    Shocking discovery suggests the 'father of American cavalry' who led the charge against British forces was biologically female

    Georgia Southern University scientists say they made the discovery about General Casimir Pulaski after years of research
    They claim DNA testing and examination of skeletal remains shows Pulaski was biologically female
    A new documentary suggests that Pulaski had an intersex condition known as congenital adrenal hyperplasia
    They said Pulaski's remains showed a female-looking pelvis, as well as a more female facial structure and jaw
    The team's findings are currently being reviewed by the Journal of Forensic Anthropology

    Scientific researchers are arguing that examination of skeletal remains and DNA testing has found that a Revolutionary war hero dubbed 'the father of the American cavalry' was in fact biologically female.

    Researchers from Georgia Southern University say they made the discovery about General Casimir Pulaski after years of research examining the general's remains.

    Their claims are laid out in a new documentary - The General Was Female? - on the Smithsonian Channel's America's Hidden Stories series, which airs next week.

    The documentary suggests that Pulaski had an intersex condition known as congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    The condition results in genetic females producing excessive amounts of male steroid hormones that can lead to abnormal sexual development and make genitals appear more masculine.

    'That's pretty much the only way to explain the combination of features that we see,' Virginia Hutton Estabrook of Georgia Southern University told the Chicago Tribune.

    In addition to the female-looking pelvis, researchers say the skeletal remains also had a more female facial structure and jaw.

    Backing up their claims, researchers said extensive DNA testing provided a match between the remains and Pulaski's grand-niece.

    They also said the skeleton showed evidence of horseback riding, that he was of a similar height and had a battle wound injury that Pulaski suffered.

    Pulaski, who was born in Poland in 1745, fought against Russia before later making his way to America to join the revolution and lead the charge against British forces.

    After fighting Russia, he was falsely accused of trying to assassinate the king of Poland, he went into exile in France, where he heard talk of revolution in America and met Benjamin Franklyn in Paris.

    Historians say Pulaski likely saved George Washington's life during one battle by stalling British forces.

    He died in 1779 at the age of 34 fighting a battle in Savannah.

    Pulaski was initially buried on a Savannah plantation before his remains were dug up and buried at a memorial dedicated to him in one of the city's squares in 1854.

    The subject of his remains have been a mystery for more than 100 years with some speculating about whether the general was actually ever buried in Savannah or if he was laid to rest at sea.

    Permission was eventually granted in 1996 to study the remains buried in the Pulaski Monument.

    The initial findings confused scientists when further examination suggested the skeletal remains appeared to be biologically female.

    It fueled speculation that the remains did not actually belong to Pulaski.

    The research into the general's bone samples was dropped several years later due to lack of funding for additional DNA testing.

    It was taken back up again in 2015 by researchers at the Georgia Southern University and they were given funding by the Smithsonian Channel for the costly DNA lab work.

    The team's findings are currently being reviewed by the Journal of Forensic Anthropology.

    Pulaski never married or fathered any children but was engaged in a long correspondence with a female friend throughout a large part of his adult life.

    Like many foreign officers in the Continental Army, Pulaski caused animosity among his colleagues.

    He was said to have demanded that only high-ranking generals such as George Washington and Marquis de Lafayette were in higher positions and that he reported directly to Congress.

    Unable to speak much English, Pulaski only reluctantly took orders even from Washington and caused ructions with fellow officers in the revolutionary army.

    One rival was Anthony Wayne, who believed Pulaski looked down on the fighting ability of American soldiers.

    Pulaski also resented that American officers disliked taking orders from a foreigner.

    He also lodged court martial proceedings against one his own commanders, Stephen Moylan, for disobeying his orders and punching a fellow Polish soldier.

    After resigning his post as chief of cavalry in March 1778, Pulaski sought Congressional approval to raise his own cavalry made up of prisoners and deserters.

    Pulaski was mortally wounded during a brave but foolhardy cavalry charge at the Battle of Savannah in Georgia in 1779.

    It was said his enemies were so in awe of his bravery they allowed his body to taken from the battlefield and he died from a head wound on board the USS Wasp.
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  2. #2

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    Revolutionary cross dresser. What’s next? Was he hugged by Joe Biden?
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  3. #3
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    Awe Lawd, he/she would have to be buried in Georgia.

  4. #4

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    How F'n intrusive!!
    Guess that secret can't be taken to the grave.

    How can anybody have the right to dig a person up from the grave just to further their educational/career studies?
    Suppose after your flesh is gone, your remains are just historical evidence.

    Got permission from Pulaski's family..but they suspected it might be someone else that was buried there...what about permission from that persons family?
    Last edited by IMAUDIGGER; Apr 09, 2019 at 04:31 PM.
    All treasures found with permission on private property or on active mining claims.

 

 

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