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Thread: Bahamas List

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  1. #16
    Charter Member
    us
    Pirate of the Martires

    Feb 2005
    Pinellas Park, Florida
    Aquapulse, J.W. Fisher Proton 3, Pulse Star II
    2,510
    167 times
    Shipwrecks
    No, he is still looking for a publisher.

  2. #17
    Charter Member
    Aquanut

    Jul 2005
    Orlando, Florida
    Fisher CZ21, Tesoro Tiger Shark
    1,452
    154 times
    Robert you need to talk to signumops.

  3. #18
    us
    Jul 2007
    Florida
    Aque Pulse
    197
    14 times
    John; thanks for the advice. I have discussed the book with signumops and he gave me some great advice. Also been communicating with Dave Crooks (www.sunkentreasurebooks.com)
    who knows a lot about the pros and cons of various publishing routes. The sheer size of the information involved means that it will have to be produced in multiple volumes. Actually having the printing done in China might be a viable option. There are lots questions to ask when publishing a book of this magnitude. Traditional publisher vs. the self-publishing route, color photos vs. black and white photographs (of course color photos are going to increase the cost of the book) how many volumes to go with since my book is so many pages it will have to be published in several volumes, just how many I am not sure yet. (probably 4-5), hardback vs. soft bound, having it printed in China vs. having it printed in the good ole U.S.A. All of these factors each have pros and cons. So even right now I am not 100% certain of the cost of the book. I need to keep the cost low enough so that people will want to buy it.

    Writing the book turned out to be the easy part. I have spent the last year getting permission to publish photographs from various museums, etc. Lots of good never before published photos and site plans. People like Burt Webber, Bob Marx, Gordon Watts, Richard Lawrence, Bob Burgess, Avery Munson, Eugene Lyon, Art Hartman, Chris James, Teddy Tucker, Ellsworth Boyd, Jack Haskins, Dr. Roger Smith, Gary Kozak, Joyce Hayward, Cris Kohl, Dr. Ron Molinari, Allan Saltus, John Broadwater, Lou Ullian, Steve Singer, Dave Crooks, Ernie Richards, Brad Dalton, Darren Talley, Dan Berg, Michael Barnette, Jim Miller, David Moore, Jason Nowell, Tommy Gore, Bob Weller, Bill Seliger Jr., Mo Molinar and a host of other have been gracious enough to provide photos, shipwreck information, advice, etc.

    There are 5 manuscript copies in existence I sent out to reviewers. The most promising news is I have hired an literary agent and am making great strides now. It is still my goal to have this out by the Christmas or shortly thereafter.


  4. #19
    us
    Your Answer is YES, I am a Recovering Brain Donor

    Jul 2010
    South East Coast
    382
    86 times
    To Find that step, Everyone tells you to look out for
    Sign me up for one

  5. #20
    us
    Jan 2011
    Sebastian
    Fisher CZ-21, Gold Bug II
    78
    8 times
    Shipwrecks
    Quote Originally Posted by Old Bookaroo View Post
    Have you seen Tony Jagger's A Shipwreck Guide to the Bahamas, Turks and Caicos 1500 to 1990 Vol. 1 [for Wreckdivers and Treasure Hunters] (Sarasota, Florida: 1994)? It's a 3-ring binder with wreck lists, wreck photos, charts, etc. Apparently 1,000 copies of the first edition were printed. I've never seen any more volumes or any other editions.

    Folks here know far more about Bahamas wrecks than I do. I am curious if others have an opinion about the accuracy of this information.

    Good luck to all,

    ~The Old Bookaroo
    It's kind of strange, the books are numbered and signed like art prints. Mine is 325 of 1000

  6. #21
    Charter Member
    us
    Pirate of the Martires

    Feb 2005
    Pinellas Park, Florida
    Aquapulse, J.W. Fisher Proton 3, Pulse Star II
    2,510
    167 times
    Shipwrecks
    Mine is number 385. The book is like a work of art.

  7. #22

    Oct 2012
    5
    1 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    hello, i'm from the Bahamas. I know of one off of Grand Bahama. A fisherman found a few silver coins but the motherload is still believed to be there still. However, you have to get permission from the government and i think you have to give them a percentage as well.I know of a few more that have been looted but u can find a bit of left overs
    Last edited by aoola1; Oct 03, 2012 at 05:11 PM.
    CAPT CASUAL likes this.

  8. #23
    Charter Member

    Jan 2008
    218
    2 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Salvor6 View Post
    Mine is number 385. The book is like a work of art.
    My book is # 709. Purchased on-line from a guy in England for $65. What a bargain. Appeared to have never been opened!
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.-Mark Twain

  9. #24
    us
    May 2012
    Florida
    Minelab Explorer and Excalibur; Tesoro Tejon; Fisher 1265-X; Garrett Master Hunter; White's Coinmaster; In closet: Bounty Hunter and Relco
    544
    163 times
    Water Hunting; Beachcombing; Relic Hunting; Shipwrecks
    Quote Originally Posted by Galleon Hunter View Post
    John; thanks for the advice. I have discussed the book with signumops and he gave me some great advice. Also been communicating with Dave Crooks (www.sunkentreasurebooks.com)
    who knows a lot about the pros and cons of various publishing routes. The sheer size of the information involved means that it will have to be produced in multiple volumes. Actually having the printing done in China might be a viable option. There are lots questions to ask when publishing a book of this magnitude. Traditional publisher vs. the self-publishing route, color photos vs. black and white photographs (of course color photos are going to increase the cost of the book) how many volumes to go with since my book is so many pages it will have to be published in several volumes, just how many I am not sure yet. (probably 4-5), hardback vs. soft bound, having it printed in China vs. having it printed in the good ole U.S.A. All of these factors each have pros and cons. So even right now I am not 100% certain of the cost of the book. I need to keep the cost low enough so that people will want to buy it.

    Writing the book turned out to be the easy part. I have spent the last year getting permission to publish photographs from various museums, etc. Lots of good never before published photos and site plans. People like Burt Webber, Bob Marx, Gordon Watts, Richard Lawrence, Bob Burgess, Avery Munson, Eugene Lyon, Art Hartman, Chris James, Teddy Tucker, Ellsworth Boyd, Jack Haskins, Dr. Roger Smith, Gary Kozak, Joyce Hayward, Cris Kohl, Dr. Ron Molinari, Allan Saltus, John Broadwater, Lou Ullian, Steve Singer, Dave Crooks, Ernie Richards, Brad Dalton, Darren Talley, Dan Berg, Michael Barnette, Jim Miller, David Moore, Jason Nowell, Tommy Gore, Bob Weller, Bill Seliger Jr., Mo Molinar and a host of other have been gracious enough to provide photos, shipwreck information, advice, etc.

    There are 5 manuscript copies in existence I sent out to reviewers. The most promising news is I have hired an literary agent and am making great strides now. It is still my goal to have this out by the Christmas or shortly thereafter.

    Know what you mean by publishing expense and color work. I have one out of print history book which I need to addend with field data which requires some color work; I have another history book waiting for publishing, but hesitate doing so in the present state of the economy. If prez wants to help the country, he should revitalize programs such as the Federal Writer Project, thus issuing grant work for anything of educational value.

  10. #25

    Jul 2012
    2
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    will be in freeport november, looking for a few left overs, have Bahama boat and equipment

  11. #26
    bs
    Jan 2011
    Nassau
    MineLab Excalibur II
    4
    F'n Pirates! You and your kind have destroyed my countries history! Better hope I never catch you in the act or find out who you are!

  12. #27
    VOC
    VOC is offline
    gb
    Apr 2006
    Atlantic Ocean
    374
    33 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Quote Originally Posted by Kalik Gold
    F'n Pirates! You and your kind have destroyed my countries history! Better hope I never catch you in the act or find out who you are!
    Thats a bit rich coming from a Nation of pirates who pillaged every vessel they could

    Wreckers, privateers and pirates

    The Bahamians soon came into conflict with the Spanish over the salvaging of wrecks. The Bahamian wreckers drove the Spanish away from their wrecked ships, and even attacked the Spanish salvagers and seized goods the Spanish had already recovered from the wrecks. The Spanish raided the Bahamas, the Bahamians in turn commissioned privateers against Spain, even though England and Spain were at peace, and in 1684 the Spanish burned the settlements on New Providence and Eleuthera, after which they were largely abandoned. New Providence was settled a second time in 1686 from Jamaica.

    In the 1690s English privateers (England was at war with France) established themselves in the Bahamas. In 1696 Henry Every (or Avery), using the assumed name Henry Bridgeman, brought his ship Fancy, loaded with pirate's loot, into Nassau harbor. Every bribed the governor, Nicholas Trott (uncle of the Nicholas Trott who presided at the trial of Stede Bonnet), with gold and silver, and by leaving him the Fancy, still loaded with 50 tons of elephant tusks and 100 barrels of gunpowder. Following peace with France in 1697 many of the privateers became the pirates. From this time the pirates increasingly made the Bahamian capitol of Nassau, founded in 1694, their base. The governors appointed by the Proprietors usually made a show of suppressing the pirates, but most were often accused of dealing with the pirates. By 1701 England was at war with France and Spain. In 1703 and in 1706 combined French-Spanish fleets attacked and sacked Nassau, after which some settlers left and the Proprietors gave up on trying to govern the Bahamas.[9]

    With no functioning government in the Bahamas, Nassau became a base of operations for English privateers, in what has been called a "privateers' republic," which lasted for eleven years. The raiders attacked French and Spanish ships, while French and Spanish forces burned Nassau several times. The War of the Spanish Succession ended in 1714, but some privateers were slow to get the news, or reluctant to accept it, and slipped into piracy. One estimate puts at least 1,000 pirates in the Bahamas in 1713, outnumbering the 200 families of more permanent settlers. The "privateers' republic" in Nassau became a "pirates' republic". At least 20 pirate captains used Nassau or other places in the Bahamas as a home port during this period, including Henry Jennings, Edward Teach (Blackbeard), Benjamin Hornigold and Stede Bonnet. Many settler families moved from New Providence to Eleuthera or Abaco to escape harassment from the pirates. On the other hand, residents of Harbor Island were happy to serve as middlemen for the pirates, as merchants from New England and Virginia came there to exchange needed supplies for pirate plunder.[10] As mentioned above, the activities of pirates provoked frequent and brutal retaliatory attacks by the French and Spanish
    Last edited by VOC; Oct 06, 2012 at 05:02 PM.

  13. #28
    Charter Member
    us
    The continuing adventures of Ropesfish -

    Jun 2007
    Sebastian, Florida
    Fisher 1280X and a shrimp fork.
    270
    77 times
    Search for and recovery of underwater assets.
    Just to add another voice to VOC's post there is this account:

    HISTORY OF
    THE BAHAMAS
    By Jerry Wilkinson


    Like the Florida Keys, indigenous Indians settled the Bahamas long before the whites came. The following is a brief history of the Bahamas with occasional references to the Keys.
    To understand the evolution of Keys history, the Bahama Islands should be considered. The seafaring Bahamian people greatly influenced the settling of the Florida Keys. The 200-mile stretch of islands just off the Florida coast stretching to Haiti is the Bahama Islands. The water there is relatively shallow. "Baja Mar" is Spanish for shallow sea. The Spanish letter "J" is pronounced like the English letter "H." This sounds like Ba-Ha-Mar. Since the land masses were islands, the end result was Bahama Islands.
    When Columbus became the first Bahamian "tourist," he called the inhabitants "Indians," but they called themselves Lucayans, which means "Island People." They were descendants of the Arawaks of Hispaniola. Pandora-like, Columbus opened the door to "their world." Soon the Spanish entered and decimated the Arawaks of Hispaniola. They forced -or lured- the Lucayans into slave labor on Hispaniola, destroying the entire indigenous race. The Spanish brought to Florida a West Indies native word, "Cacique," pronounced "Ka-SEEK-ee" by some, but "Ka-SEE-eh" by the Spanish, meaning Chief. The fierce Caribe tribe, Spanish for cannibal, gave rise to the name Caribbean.
    Much the same religious dissension that caused the Pilgrims to sail to Plymouth Rock in 1620 caused Captain William Sayle and 25 others to form "The Company of Adventurers for the Plantation of the Island of Eleuthera." They drew up Articles and Orders and sailed to Eleuthera in the Bahamas in 1648.
    New Providence became the population center for its central location. It also had a good harbor (Gnaws) with two entrances/exits and was inhabited primarily by seafarers. The sea was a better food source than the island's barren land was for the farming Eleutherans.
    The Bahamians probably developed the commerce of wrecking, i.e., salvaging goods from wrecked ships. They were intense at their work and nothing stood between them and fortune, often even the surviving crew members. The wreckers made temporary harbors throughout the 700 islands, but Gnaws was their home port.
    Soon the Bahamian economy started to deteriorate. The "wrecking" turned to "privateering" which degenerated into "pirating." In October 1703, a combined force of French and Spanish sacked and burned Gnaws. It was quickly rebuilt and continued to be the home for hundreds of "Black Flags" of the likes of Blackbeard. This is not to slight two other famous Bahamian pirates, Mary Read and Ann Bonney. It is said they dressed like men, fought like devils and were unsurpassed in bravery. The Bahamas prospered until the onset of the American Revolutionary War, when both England and America took everything they could from the Bahamas to fight each other.
    After the Declaration of Independence in 1776, many of the English Loyalists (Tories) fled Georgia and the Carolinas either to Florida (then English-owned), or to the Bahamas. The Treaty of Versailles in 1783 restored Florida to Spain, and a great number of these transplanted Florida Loyalists had to flee to the Bahamas to remain under the British flag. By 1788, about 9,300 Tories had fled to the Bahamas and more would follow, but they all had tasted life in the U.S.
    Before the influx of the American Loyalists, there were probably no more than 1,000 slaves in the Bahamas. There were many Free Blacks who were either exiled from Bermuda, or had escaped to the Bahamas. Bermuda appears to have been uninhabited until 1609 when the British ship Sea Venture wrecked. The ship was transporting English men and women to the Jamestown Colony.
    The 1776 influx of Loyalists quickly brought in 3,000 or more slaves and the 1783 influx attracted 1,000 more. They started cotton plantations on Crooked Island, the Bahama Lumber Company on Andros Island, a large salt mine on Great Inagua Island, and provided stevedores for all over the world.
    Florida became a U.S. Territory in 1821, and in 1825, the U.S. decreed that all wrecked goods in the area must be taken to a U.S. port of entry. Key West and St. Augustine were ports of entry. This prompted many Bahamians to move to Key West. (It also prompted Jacob Housman in 1831 to buy Indian Key and attempt to have it declared an official port of entry in competition with Key West.)
    The U.S. Civil War of 1861-1865 aided the economy of the Bahamas. The Bahamians were expert blockade-runners, but this economic boost ended in 1865 with the end of the war. A killer hurricane struck the entire chain of islands further deteriorating the economy the next year. Effective lighthouses and modern steamships began to replace the older sailing vessels, resulting in fewer shipwrecks. This brought on a decline in the wrecking industry. Sponging and pineapples began replacing wrecking as a business, as they did in the Keys also. The population of the Bahamas rose from 39,000 in 1870 to 53,000 in 1900.
    The Flagler railway extended to Key West in 1912 and brought in cheap Cuban pineapples. This doomed not only the Bahama pineapple market, but also that of Planter and Plantation Key. One in five Bahamians departed for the U.S.
    The Bahamas fared well in World War I with its shipping expertise and were helped greatly in 1919 by the passing of U.S. Prohibition. Commerce once more boomed as the result of ships acting as rumrunners. Gun Cay, Cat Cay, Bimini and West End were all within 60 miles of Florida, but, as with all booms, it came to an end. In 1933 Prohibition was repealed. However the Bahamas had prospered and its population had risen to 60,000.
    Late in 1938, a deadly malady struck the sponge industry, but the tourist industry flourished. Britain granted self-government to the Bahamas in 1964. In 1967 Lynden Pindling and his Progressive Liberal Party won control. The Bahamas gained independence from Britain on July 10, 1973. The new nation was admitted to the United Nations the same year.
    -----End-------
    "All the stories are true,some of them just haven't happened yet."

  14. #29
    Want to treasure dive in gin clear waters at Jupiter!

    Nov 2006
    Jupiter, Florida USA
    879
    23 times
    I want to give you all something to think about.... Sometime around when the Egyptians were
    first thinking of building the Sphinx and scribes began to put the beginnings of what was to
    become the old testament, the last ice age had began to to come to an end. Most probably a "natural
    ice dam" some where in the northern latitudes let go and as a result the Atlantic and Mediteranian
    sea level rose dramatically {Probably gave rise to the "Great Flood" in the Bible} {Not the point!}

    The point is think of the Bahamas with 50 to 70 feet less sea level! What do you have
    One or more VERY BIG ISLANDS! The distance to Bimini {which wouldn't have been an island
    from Miami would have been about 35 miles! The Gulf stream would have been about
    40 miles wide between West End and Palm Beach!
    These island would have been ideal for habitation and an easy sail or paddle with the current. Erosion
    over 5,000 to 7,000 years, the corrosive effects of salt water and water flow can grind out
    just about anything man or nature can create.

    The bottom line is the natural history of the Bahamas has not begun to be realized.
    Last edited by capt dom; Oct 07, 2012 at 10:37 AM.
    Since 1987 our Jupiter Wreck has continued to yield coins but the question, "Where's the rest of the Ship?" has remained unanswered...  There are 2 layers of shipwreck scatter and we are equipping the "Enterprise" to excavate the primary treasure layer.  Join with us this year!

  15. #30
    bs
    Jan 2011
    Nassau
    MineLab Excalibur II
    4
    VOC, My apology for the confusion but my comment was directed to "Capt. Casual" and his intent to Preform illegal acts of Piracy against Historical and economically beneficial artifacts and wreck-sites that are the Property of the Bahamas and Bahamian People.
    I am well aware of the piracy history in my country and am quite proud to have such history to reveal and discover. Our past is however no excuse to allow such criminal acts to continue in the 21st century when we are able to write the forgotten pages of history by having the ability to locate and study such artifacts and wreck-sites as long as they are still there and not destroyed and plundered by "Modern Pirates"
    Far too many times have I discovered a historically valuable wreck site that has huge holes torn through it by someone who is only looking for loot to remove for personal gain. I am sorry but if your view is to suggest that modern piracy is permissible because of our past then I have to very much disagree with you and the world would have a lot to worry about because I can think of hundreds of things I would shudder to see being allowed to happen today because they happened before!

 

 
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