10 missing ships lost without trace. - Page 2
Welcome guest, is this your first visit?
Member
Discoveries
 
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 39
Like Tree103Likes

Thread: 10 missing ships lost without trace.

« Prev Thread | Next Thread »
  1. #16
    fm
    Raggedy old Crow

    Jan 2005
    In a tax haven some where
    ONES THAT GO BEEP! :-)
    2,866
    7681 times
    Growing old disgrace fully as possible.
    Gidday Amigos

    Indeed the great lakes has had more than its fair share of missing ships.



    SS D.M. Clemson above was a 468-foot (143 m) long steel-hulled Great Lakes freighter that went missing on 1 December 1908, on Lake Superior. The ship was last seen coming through the Soo Locks, onto Lake Superior. The ship was built in 1903 for the Provident Steamship Company. She is known for sinking on Lake Superior, on the night of 1 December 1908 with all hands; 24 men lost their lives. The wreck of D.M. Clemson is still missing, and the cause of her sinking remains a mystery to this day.



    SS Canastota above was a British-flagged, coal-burning, two-masted, steel screw, cargo steamer of 4,904 gross register tons (GRT) and 3,139 net register tons (NRT). Canastota was last seen on 13 June 1921, leaving Sydney bound for Wellington, New Zealand. Although almost forgotten today, Canastota's loss was a major news item, in Australia and New Zealand, during the second half of 1921.



    K?benhavn above was a Danish, British-built five-masted barque used as a naval training vessel until its disappearance after December 22, 1928. Built for the Danish East Asiatic Company in 1921, it was the world's largest sailing ship at the time, and primarily served for sail training of young cadets.

    The K?benhavn was last heard from on December 21, 1928, while en route from Buenos Aires to Australia. When it became clear the ship was missing, a lengthy search ensued, but neither K?benhavn nor anyone who had been aboard her on her final voyage were ever found. Despite both the extensive search and much speculation about the vessel's fate, K?benhavn remains missing and what happened to her crew and cadets remains a mystery.



    Aurora above was last seen in 1917, when she departed Newcastle, New South Wales, bound for Iquique, Chile with a cargo of coal. Lloyd's of London posted the ship as missing on 2 January 1918; it was believed she was a casualty of World War I, possibly being sunk by a mine laid by the German merchant raider Wolf. One of Aurora's lifebelts was recovered from the Tasman Sea between Sydney and Brisbane six months after her disappearance.



    MV Kairali above was a bulk carrier, owned by Kerala Shipping Corporation (KSC). She disappeared with her crew of 49 and 20,000 tonnes of iron ore on 3 July 1979 while sailing from Margao, India to Rostock, Germany, via Djibouti.



    The steamship Bannockburn above was a Canadian registered steel-hulled freighter which disappeared on Lake Superior in snowy weather on November 21, 1902. She was sighted by the captain of a passing vessel, the SS Algonquin, around noon of that day but minutes later disappeared. The wreck of the ship has never been found, with the exception of an oar and a life preserver, and no bodies were ever recovered. Within a year of her disappearance she acquired a reputation as a ghost ship and became known as The Flying Dutchman of the Great Lakes.

    Gee Kanacki the more you look the more you find ships missing without trace.

    Crow
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	D.M._Clemson_2.jpg 
Views:	100 
Size:	224.8 KB 
ID:	1946849   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	lossy-page1-800px-SS_Canastota.tif.jpg 
Views:	99 
Size:	55.8 KB 
ID:	1946850   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	StateLibQld_1_143507_K?benhavn_(ship).jpg 
Views:	94 
Size:	56.7 KB 
ID:	1946851   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	800px-Aurora_anchored_to_floe-ice_off_the_West_Base.jpg 
Views:	97 
Size:	97.3 KB 
ID:	1946852   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Bannockburn_in_drydock.jpg 
Views:	95 
Size:	105.6 KB 
ID:	1946856  

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	MV Kairali.jpg 
Views:	98 
Size:	47.9 KB 
ID:	1946855  
    releventchair, KANACKI and Yeager like this.

  2. #17
    Charter Member
    us
    "WP"

    May 2012
    16,012
    33035 times
    There can be rouge waves on the great lakes.
    "Chop" is common. Short pounding waves.
    As a youth I'd get turned loose in a 16' aluminum boat inland. A route allowed passing through two lakes into Lake Michigan.
    You picked your days. Too rough of water in the large second lake ,or at a channel mouth , one turned back.
    That boat groaned at times , and rivets talked. Years of poundings....

    How a craft is built matters. Swells on the ocean vs chop of the great lakes , and each lakes characteristics (Earie for example is shallow in relation to others. seiche is faster probably. and waves can get wild fast.)
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Lake_Erie_0261.jpg 
Views:	9 
Size:	205.2 KB 
ID:	1946861

    But , back to design , compromise costs cargo space.
    While I vote better safe than sorry , others risk more.

    [ Profile photo for Phil Hanbidge
    Phil Hanbidge
    , lives in Canada
    Answered 2 years ago ? Upvoted by
    Neill Conroy
    , I am a seafarer and professional ship manager. My great-grandfather was a shipowner and Master and my grandfa? ? Author has 307 answers and 321.8K answer views
    Ships that are specifically designed as Great Lakes bulk carriers are NOT (in most cases) suitable for operations in offshore trade.
    ?Lakers? are optimized to carry maximum cargo through the locks of the St Lawrence Seaway (Seaway-max), and some (there are about thirteen 1000-footers) are so large they cannot transit below Lake Erie as they can only fit through the locks at Sault Ste Marie (Soo-max). They are typically slower than their offshore cousins, since speed is less crucial in inland waters trade.
    These ships have little or no flare to their bows so they would slam heavily into the larger waves found in open seas. Also their structural integrity is not designed for the stresses of the longer wavelengths of ocean swells.
    They are designed to meet the specific regulatory controls of the Canada / US waters within which they operate.


    By comparison, ocean freighters are typically built with finer lines, greater flare to their bow, and structural integrity designed for the waves encountered at sea. The foc?sle is designed to give protection against waves breaking across the open decks. Design considerations take into account the variety of port state controls they will encounter in voyaging to different countries.


    Now, there are certainly ships that are designed for both Great Lakes trade AND offshore voyages. They typically sacrifice their optimal cargo capacity for a bit more seakindliness/seaworthiness.


    While these all might look similar to the layman, there are certainly design considerations that are unique to each. A laker would theoretically be able to make limited voyages offshore (in fact, some are built or modified overseas then sailed offshore WITH RESTRICTIONS), but would by no means be suitable for unrestricted ocean operations.]
    Crow and KANACKI like this.

  3. #18

    Mar 2015
    1,423
    5790 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Hola Amigo

    I have not sailed the great lakes but imagine the waters can be very deceptive. The term lake is deceptive as it more an inland sea than a lake.

    Kanacki
    Crow likes this.

  4. #19
    Charter Member
    us
    "WP"

    May 2012
    16,012
    33035 times
    The lakes see many sails.
    A weather eye matters.

    KANACKI, Crow and Yeager like this.

  5. #20
    fm
    Raggedy old Crow

    Jan 2005
    In a tax haven some where
    ONES THAT GO BEEP! :-)
    2,866
    7681 times
    Growing old disgrace fully as possible.
    Gidday amigos

    In the voyages I sailed with Kanacki on the "Drumbeat" There is always a deep seated fear somewhere some place the ocean if you disrespect her will claim you for her ocean and be swallowed up into oblivion. Kanackis drumbeat was a tiny in comparison to some of these ships that vanished without trace.



    Here is some vessels that disappeared without trace.

    MS Munchen below was a German LASH carrier of the Hapag-Lloyd line that sank with all hands for unknown reasons in a severe storm in December 1978. The most accepted theory is that one or more rogue waves hit Munchen and damaged her, so that she drifted for 33 hours with a list of 50 degrees without electricity or propulsion. disappeared without trace.

    How can such large ships vanish without trace? Perhaps a testimate to powers of the winds a oceans that keep their secrets well.





    SS Vaitarna below, popularly known as Vijli or Haji Kasam ni Vijli, was a steamship owned by A J Shepherd & Co, Bombay that disappeared on 8 November 1888 off the coast of Saurashtra region of Gujarat in cyclonic storm during a crossing from Mandvi to Bombay. More than 740 people on board went missing in the disaster.



    SS Java built in 1865 below went through several names and owners. In 1889 it was sold to a French company and renamed the Electrique. In 1892 it was sold again to J. Herron & Co of Liverpool and again renamed the Lord Spencer. During an 1895 voyage from San Francisco to New York it went missing.



    F/V Pacesetter below was a 127-foot (38.7 m), steel-hulled, Bering Sea crab-fishing boat launched in 1976 as Priscilla Ann. In 1979, she was renamed Coastal Glacier. The vessel eventually was acquired by Matt Pope and Dale Lindsay and renamed Pacesetter. Pacesetter was reported missing in 1996 by the United States Coast Guard Seventeenth District headquartered at Kodiak, Alaska. The search ended with no sign of the boat or her seven-man crew. The loss of Pacesetter was noted as the worst sinking in the Alaskan 1996 snow fishery.



    Proteus below was lost at sea to an unknown cause sometime after 23 November 1941. There are no German U-boat claims for this vessel.One suggestion, having no supporting documentation, is that the vessel's disappearance can be attributed to the Bermuda Triangle. One thing suspicious that two over of her class disappeared without trace cyclops and Neresus.



    Such mysterious fate for such vessels most of all it the relatives, friends and lovers have no closure on the ultimate fate of loved ones and go to their grave not knowing what went wrong.

    Crow
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	gallery_4086_416_1323700469_39411.jpg 
Views:	78 
Size:	227.4 KB 
ID:	1947115   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	679841.jpg 
Views:	76 
Size:	32.2 KB 
ID:	1947117   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	23e22a66a8b4630f68d91bb368da56601b22adc8.jpg 
Views:	74 
Size:	89.6 KB 
ID:	1947122   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	cdv-cunard-royal-mail-steam-ship-java_1_af08b96c02c3eeea3cce889dbb063171.jpg 
Views:	76 
Size:	87.8 KB 
ID:	1947134   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	18952595_1440588059331194_1652899793468478612_n.jpg 
Views:	76 
Size:	59.0 KB 
ID:	1947136  

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Proteus.ac9.JPG 
Views:	77 
Size:	119.7 KB 
ID:	1947138  
    KANACKI likes this.

  6. #21
    fm
    Raggedy old Crow

    Jan 2005
    In a tax haven some where
    ONES THAT GO BEEP! :-)
    2,866
    7681 times
    Growing old disgrace fully as possible.
    Gidday Amigos

    Here is few more missing vessels.

    F/V Andrea Gail below was a commercial fishing vessel that was lost at sea with all hands during the Perfect Storm of 1991. The vessel and her six-man crew had been fishing the North Atlantic Ocean out of Gloucester, Massachusetts. Her last reported position was 180 mi (290 km) northeast of Sable Island on October 28, 1991. The story of Andrea Gail and her crew was the basis of the 1997 book The Perfect Storm by Sebastian Junger, and a 2000 film adaptation of the same name.



    Lake Huron keep its secrets well also? The SS James Carruthers below was a Canadian Great Lakes freighter built in 1913. The ship was owned by the St. Lawrence & Chicago Steam and Navigation Company of Toronto, Ontario, with the official registry number 131090. The Carruthers was lost 9 November 1913 on Lake Huron during the Great Lakes Storm of 1913. The crew of 22 perished with the vessel. Although looking at the picture the vessel seems frightfully fragile in breaking in two?



    Lake Superior has a bite too? The SS Leafield below was hauling steel rails, bound for Midland, when she sank in deep water in Lake Superior, probably off the Angus Rocks in the Angus Islands, about 14 miles (23 km) southeast of Port Arthur, Ontario, on 9 November 1913 during the Great Lakes storm of 1913. Her entire crew of 18 perished. A search found no trace of the ship or crew.



    SS Chicora below was a passenger-and-freight steamer built in 1892 for service on the Great Lakes. Considered to be one of Lake Michigan's finest steamers, she was lost with all hands in January 1895. She is now remembered chiefly for being mentioned by Chicago writer Nelson Algren, in Algren’s prose-poem, Chicago: City on the Make: “Who now knows the sorrowful long-ago name of the proud steamer Chicora, down with all hands in the ice off South Haven?” as well as “Sunk under the ice in the waves off South Haven, sunk with all hands for good and forever, for keeps and a single day.”



    HMS Atalanta below was a 26-gun Spartan-class sixth-rate frigate of the Royal Navy launched in 1844 at Pembroke. Built as HMS Juno, she carried out the historic role in 1857 of annexing the Cocos (Keeling) Islands to the British Empire. She was renamed HMS Mariner in January 1878 and then HMS Atalanta two weeks later. Atalanta was serving as a training ship when in 1880 she disappeared with her entire crew after setting sail from the Royal Naval Dockyard in Bermuda for Falmouth, England on 31 January 1880. It was presumed that she sank in a powerful storm which crossed her route a couple of weeks after she sailed.



    Crow
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	andrea_gail_perfect_storm.jpg 
Views:	81 
Size:	131.6 KB 
ID:	1947139   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	James_Carruthers_underway.jpg 
Views:	78 
Size:	70.2 KB 
ID:	1947140   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Leafield_before_the_1913_Great_Lakes_storm.jpg 
Views:	80 
Size:	235.1 KB 
ID:	1947142   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Chicora_underway.jpg 
Views:	82 
Size:	67.7 KB 
ID:	1947143   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	HMS_Atalanta_(cropped).jpg 
Views:	79 
Size:	114.6 KB 
ID:	1947144  

    KANACKI likes this.

  7. #22

    Mar 2015
    1,423
    5790 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Hola amigos

    So many ships that vanished with no clear evidence on their exact fate?

    The SS City of Boston below was a British iron-hulled single-screw passenger steamship of the Inman Line which disappeared in the North Atlantic Ocean en route from Halifax, Nova Scotia, to Liverpool in January 1870. The City of Boston sailed from Halifax, Nova Scotia for Liverpool on 28 January 1870 commanded by Captain Halcrow. She had 191 people on board: 55 cabin passengers, 52 steerage passengers and a crew of 84. A number of the passengers were prominent businessmen and military officers from Halifax. She never reached her destination and no trace of her was ever found.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	City_of_Boston_mail_steamer.jpg 
Views:	5 
Size:	115.7 KB 
ID:	1947149

    Cymric below was a British and Irish schooner, built in 1893. She joined the South American trade in the fleet of Arklow, Ireland, in 1906. She served as a British Q-ship during the First World War; she failed to sink any German U-boats, but did sink a British submarine in error.

    After the war, she returned to the British and, later, the Irish merchant service. In Ringsend, Ireland, she collided with a tram, her bowsprit smashing through the tram's windows. In 1944, during the Second World War, sailing as a neutral, she vanished without trace with the loss of eleven lives.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	800px-StateLibQld_1_150259_Cymric_(ship).jpg 
Views:	5 
Size:	37.9 KB 
ID:	1947150

    USS Albany below, the first United States Navy ship of that name, was built in the 1840s for the US Navy. The ship was among the last of the wooden sloops powered by sail and saw extensive service in the Mexican War. Before and after her combat service, Albany conducted surveillance and observation missions throughout the Caribbean. In September 1854, during a journey along the coast of Venezuela, Albany was lost with all hands on 28 or 29 September 1854. Included among the 250 men lost were several sons and grandsons of politically prominent men.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	800px-Albany-sloop-Currier-Ives.jpeg 
Views:	5 
Size:	105.2 KB 
ID:	1947151


    SS United Kingdom below, which disappeared with eighty persons. She left port on 17th April 1868.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	steamer united kingdom.JPG 
Views:	5 
Size:	136.9 KB 
ID:	1947152

    The steamship Tempest below, of the Anchor Line, was added to the increasing list of mysterious disappearances on the Atlantic. She sailed on 26th February 1857, with a crew and passengers numbering one hundred and fifty all told, and was never seen again. It was with the Tempest that the Anchor Line began its service between Glasgow and New York.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	tempest.jpg 
Views:	5 
Size:	768.2 KB 
ID:	1947153

    All of these ships had a story of a sad fate and reminder we are even today at the mercy of the winds and weather.

    Kanacki
    Crow and releventchair like this.

  8. #23

    Mar 2015
    1,423
    5790 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Hola amigos

    Here is some more.

    A vessel called the Scanderia, of the Anglo-Egypterian Line, a British organisation, sailed on 8th October 1872, and nothing was ever heard of her afterwards. She had thirty-eight persons on board on leaving the port. Scanderia was chartered from the Anglo‑Egyptian Navigation Company in December 1868 by the Telegraph Construction and Maintenance Company who fitted the vessel out for cable work by the installation of four cable tanks with a total coiling capacity of 24,381 cubic feet and company paying out and picking up machines.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	CS-Charente.jpg 
Views:	4 
Size:	61.6 KB 
ID:	1947154

    City of Limerick below having forty-three persons on board, disappeared completely vanished off the face of the earth in 1881, no trace of her was ever found.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Inman_Line_-_SS_City_of_Limerick_001.jpg 
Views:	4 
Size:	291.8 KB 
ID:	1947155

    The Madagascar below was a large British merchant ship built for the trade to India and China in 1837 that disappeared on a voyage from Melbourne to London in 1853. The disappearance of Madagascar was one of the great maritime mysteries of the 19th century and has probably been the subject of more speculation than any other 19th century maritime puzzle, except for the Mary Celeste.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	800px-East_Indiamen_Madagascar.JPG 
Views:	4 
Size:	73.7 KB 
ID:	1947156

    Neustria below was a passenger ship of the French Fabre Line. Built by Claparede and Company, Rouen, France, she was 328 feet (100 meters) long and had a beam of 40 feet (12 meters). Neustria had a compound engine and single screw, one funnel, two masts, and a straight stem, and was of iron construction. She could carry 18 first-class passengers and 1,100 passengers in steerage. She was employed on the Marseille–New York City route with a stop in Spain. In the Spanish–American War during 1898, Spain used Neustria to bring back Spanish troops from Cuba.

    According to The Statue of Liberty Ellis Island Foundation Website, the Neustria transported immigrants from Naples, Italy, via Marseilles to the Port of New York, from which they were ferried by barges to Ellis Island, from 1892 to 1908.

    On October 27, 1908, Neustria sailed from New York to Marseille and vanished without a trace. She was not carrying any passengers at the time, but her entire crew of 38 was lost. Her wreck has never been found and her fate remains a mystery?

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	unnamed.jpg 
Views:	4 
Size:	142.8 KB 
ID:	1947162

    Driver was a clipper ship, constructed for David Ogden et al in 1854 at Newburyport, Massachusetts. She sailed between New York and Liverpool carrying immigrants to the US for the Red Cross Line. She was lost at sea with no known survivors after setting sail from Liverpool 12 February 1856. 377 lost their lives.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	driver clipper ship.jpg 
Views:	4 
Size:	3.17 MB 
ID:	1947164

    So many ships amigos. The simple reality is that even today, ships go missing all the time without a trace,” Delgado says. To wit: UNESCO estimates there are three million ships sitting on the bottom of the ocean, and Delgado theorizes we have no clue what happened to at least one million of them, nor do we know where they are

    Kanacki
    Last edited by KANACKI; Sep 14, 2021 at 12:44 AM.
    Crow, releventchair and Yeager like this.

  9. #24
    us
    ARC

    Aug 2014
    Bahia Del Espiritu Santo - "Bay of the Holy Spirit”
    JW 8X V.2 - ML X2 - VP 580
    28,850
    86382 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Now for the missing treasure ship list.

    :P
    Last edited by AARC; Sep 15, 2021 at 03:06 AM.
    DETECT WITH RESPECT - HAVE PERMISSION - FILL HOLES - DISPOSE OF TRASH. The Random Chat Thread---> http://www.treasurenet.com/forums/ev...en-24-7-a.html

  10. #25
    us
    Jan 2018
    Virginia Beach
    72
    111 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Thanks for all the posts. Very informative and eerie. I’d imagine a lot of those big tankers simply just snapped in half and sunk in minutes.

    AARC: I don’t think anyone would be disappointed with that (:
    AARC and KANACKI like this.

  11. #26
    us
    "Is that a Geiger Counter?"

    Feb 2006
    South Central Upstate NY in the foothills of the headlands
    Minelab Musketeer Advantage Pro w/8" & 10" DD coils/Fisher F75se(Upgraded to LTD2) w/11" DD, 6.5" concentric & 9.5" NEL Sharpshooter DD coils/Sunray FX-1 Probe & F-Point/Black Widows/Rattler headphone
    12,690
    16269 times
    Metal Detecting
    Quote Originally Posted by KANACKI View Post
    Hola Amigo

    I have not sailed the great lakes but imagine the waters can be very deceptive. The term lake is deceptive as it more an inland sea than a lake.

    Kanacki
    Most terrified I have ever been in my life was when we got caught in the middle of Lake Ontario motoring our sailboat with the mast down from Sackets Harbor, NY to Oswego, NY so we could go down the Barge Canal.

    It was a calm morning and no advisories, so we decided to cut diagonally across the lake. The wind was 10 mph from the west when we left but built all morning. By noon we were burying the front 1/3 of a 34 ft/9 ton sailboat and the prop was screaming in the air repeatedly as I was trying to quarter the waves and hobby-horsing over the tops. They were easily 10 ft crest to trough, but crests only 50 ft apart. I had my wife and another couple aboard. The mast, some 400 lbs, started to work loose of its wood cradles from the pounding and at that point the woman with us lost her seating when we dropped and hit the back of her head on a fiberglass hatchway. We turned downwind and made for Mexico Bay, calling for any marinas that could accept our keel/draft. It wasn't much better down-wind as the waves were faster than our hull-speed and I had to "surf" down them diagonally and then head down so they wouldn't roll us if sideways or flood the cockpit if breaking from behind. This was the only time I ever made a VHF S?curit? call to the Coast Guard to report our position and situation and ask them to check in on us every half-hour. We were hearing "pan-pan" distress calls from fishing boats that had lost their engines. Probably from so much "sloshing" (gunk in the tank gets stirred up and plugs the filters).

    I was absolutely terrified for six hours. We finally made it to Selkirk and put into the Salmon River. The waves at the light were breaking and over-running the rocks on the breakwater (image below). We had called ahead and the dock-master told ur to "gun it" coming into the channel. I said we were flat out already. We ended up surfing a crest down the length of the channel with my heart in my throat. A crowd had gathered in what was now 30 mph winds with occasional gusts. My chest looked like I had lost a seven-round bout to Mike Tyson from repeatedly hitting the wheel. Our lady guest received a possible mild concussion, but by then she had no outward signs other than a bump and they released her.


    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Selkirk.jpg 
Views:	59 
Size:	7.0 KB 
ID:	1947220  
    Crow, Yeager, KANACKI and 2 others like this.
    "If it can be destroyed by the truth, it deserves to be destroyed by the truth" -- Carl Sagan.

    Need the names of good men and heroes to say? Say the names of M. Sgt Gordon and 1st Sgt Shugart.

  12. #27

    Mar 2015
    1,423
    5790 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie P. (NY) View Post
    Most terrified I have ever been in my life was when we got caught in the middle of Lake Ontario motoring our sailboat with the mast down from Sackets Harbor, NY to Oswego, NY so we could go down the Barge Canal.

    It was a calm morning and no advisories, so we decided to cut diagonally across the lake. The wind was 10 mph from the west when we left but built all morning. By noon we were burying the front 1/3 of a 34 ft/9 ton sailboat and the prop was screaming in the air repeatedly as I was trying to quarter the waves and hobby-horsing over the tops. They were easily 10 ft crest to trough, but crests only 50 ft apart. I had my wife and another couple aboard. The mast, some 400 lbs, started to work loose of its wood cradles from the pounding and at that point the woman with us lost her seating when we dropped and hit the back of her head on a fiberglass hatchway. We turned downwind and made for Mexico Bay, calling for any marinas that could accept our keel/draft. It wasn't much better down-wind as the waves were faster than our hull-speed and I had to "surf" down them diagonally and then head down so they wouldn't roll us if sideways or flood the cockpit if breaking from behind. This was the only time I ever made a VHF S?curit? call to the Coast Guard to report our position and situation and ask them to check in on us every half-hour. We were hearing "pan-pan" distress calls from fishing boats that had lost their engines. Probably from so much "sloshing" (gunk in the tank gets stirred up and plugs the filters).

    I was absolutely terrified for six hours. We finally made it to Selkirk and put into the Salmon River. The waves at the light were breaking and over-running the rocks on the breakwater (image below). We had called ahead and the dock-master told ur to "gun it" coming into the channel. I said we were flat out already. We ended up surfing a crest down the length of the channel with my heart in my throat. A crowd had gathered in what was now 30 mph winds with occasional gusts. My chest looked like I had lost a seven-round bout to Mike Tyson from repeatedly hitting the wheel. Our lady guest received a possible mild concussion, but by then she had no outward signs other than a bump and they released her.


    Hola amigo

    I can relate to the pounding your hull must of had.

    Here is an interesting article.

    https://www.yachtingmonthly.com/sail...planning-62960

    Kanacki

  13. #28
    us
    "Is that a Geiger Counter?"

    Feb 2006
    South Central Upstate NY in the foothills of the headlands
    Minelab Musketeer Advantage Pro w/8" & 10" DD coils/Fisher F75se(Upgraded to LTD2) w/11" DD, 6.5" concentric & 9.5" NEL Sharpshooter DD coils/Sunray FX-1 Probe & F-Point/Black Widows/Rattler headphone
    12,690
    16269 times
    Metal Detecting
    Quote Originally Posted by KANACKI View Post
    Hola amigo

    I can relate to the pounding your hull must of had.

    Here is an interesting article.

    https://www.yachtingmonthly.com/sail...planning-62960

    Kanacki
    Good article. Pity of it was there was a nice storm tri-sail in the locker - but with the mast down I couldn't use it. We lost any steadying effect of the use of a sail and just had the added weight of the horizontal mast up on a transport cradle. To do it over I should have had the mast dropped in Oswego just before we entered the canal. But our marina did it a LOT cheaper. (like $45 vs $180). And we had heard horror stories of folks waiting a full day to get it done there.
    "If it can be destroyed by the truth, it deserves to be destroyed by the truth" -- Carl Sagan.

    Need the names of good men and heroes to say? Say the names of M. Sgt Gordon and 1st Sgt Shugart.

  14. #29
    fm
    Raggedy old Crow

    Jan 2005
    In a tax haven some where
    ONES THAT GO BEEP! :-)
    2,866
    7681 times
    Growing old disgrace fully as possible.
    Quote Originally Posted by AARC View Post
    Now for the missing treasure ship list.

    :P
    Gidday AARC

    What a hard task master,,,

    Here is one possibly worth salvaging? Ever heard of a vessel called the Laurel Branch?






    Talcahano Chile in October 1903 . The British cargo ship Laurel Branch, a two-masted vessel, of 2140 tons have been wrecked on a voyage from Guayaquil and Valparaiso, bound for Liverpool and intermediate ports, with a full cargo of general merchandize, including some two thousand odd tons of metals (gold, silver and tin). Here is the Lloyd's shipping records below of her last entry in 1903 lists as in steamship section.



    Her total crew consisted of 33 hands all told, including the master, besides which there were four children passengers.
    On the 26th of August last, at noon, she was 35 miles off
    Huamblin Island bearing East the course was set to pass not less than 15 miles off Cape Raper.





    That overcast and rainy weather prevailed during the night, and, owing to the intense darkness, it was materially impossible to see any distance ahead, and at 1.50 a.m. on the 27th of August last, the vessel stranded, the exact position being latitude 46? 30', and longitude 75? 26', between Pringle Point to the South and Steward Bay to the North. Both names as far as I know have been replaced by Chilean names and not found on modern maps.

    Due to the strong currents in the area; after the stranding and total loss of the vessel and whilst engaged in landing the passengers and crew, two of the children passengers were unfortunately drowned, owing to the life-boat capsizing.

    The cargo was also lost. Which would be worth about 68 million today.
    Here is plan of the vessel. In 1903 they did not have technology and capacity to salvage her. Today with commodities prices it might be economically viable to salvage her cargo. Here is a plan of her cargo and deck structure. Depending on depth it might be possible to salvage her cargo. As you can see two front and rear cargo holds. But like with all such stories more research is needed to uncover more evidence to conform the alleged cargo. Cargo manifests might be found a Kew in the national archives or National Maritime museum.





    crow
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	laurel_branch_nautilus.jpg 
Views:	36 
Size:	130.6 KB 
ID:	1947387   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	laurel-branch.jpg 
Views:	37 
Size:	176.7 KB 
ID:	1947389   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	cape raper.jpg 
Views:	36 
Size:	383.6 KB 
ID:	1947391   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	ll0yds records laural branch.JPG 
Views:	31 
Size:	60.6 KB 
ID:	1947400  
    Last edited by Crow; Sep 16, 2021 at 05:21 AM.
    AARC and KANACKI like this.

  15. #30

    Mar 2015
    1,423
    5790 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Hola Crow amigo

    There may be further accounts elsewhere?

    2.06.1903: gathered the survivors of the ship Arequira from PSNC lost in the storm in Valparaiso. 10.09.1903: left Coronel (Chile) ore laden to Liverpool (GB). 23.09.1903: Standed at S of Stewart Bay, Strait of Magellan (Chile). 25.09.1903: The Chilean ship Casma gathered the shipwrecked, two girls died, and landed them at Talcahuano

    The Salvage Association in London received from the owners the following copy of cable from the captain in reply to inquiries made at its request:—S Ship in four fathoms water; very much exposed; back broken. Breaking up gradually. Think possible save, if attended to immediately, 100 tons wool. 100 tons metals. The association reports that it has arranged with Mesrs. Wahlen and Co., of Punta Arenas, to send their steamers at once to the vessel, to effect any salvage of cargo or ship which may be found possible. The arrangement is on " no cure no pay " terms, and leaves the salvors' remuneration, in the event of success, for settlement in London. According to a telegram from Valparaiso, dated the 5th inst., published in a London newspaper, the date of the stranding of the Laurel Branch was Aug. 28th.

    You will notice it claims only 100 tons? However there was very little tin production in Ecuador in 1900. So if it was 100 tons of metal most likely 100 tons of silver? A ton of silver is worth just over $550,000 fiat US dollars in mid-August 2019. 100 tons of silver roughly 55 million if the cargo is silver. Most of all one need to find the orginal shipping manifest to clarify that.

    Perhaps the company records still exist? The vessel was built for Nautilus Steam Shipping Co. Ltd., owned by F. & W. Ritson, of Sunderland (known as 'Branch Line') All of their ships were named after different branches of wood such as Oak Branch, Lime branch. Almond Branch, Apple Branch,Cedar Branch, Elm branch, Elder Branch, Olive Branch, Willow Branch, Pine Branch, Laurel Branch etc...

    Kanacki
    Last edited by KANACKI; Sep 16, 2021 at 09:11 AM.
    AARC likes this.

 

 
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Home | Forum | Active Topics | What's New

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Lost Ships of the Mojave Desert
    By luke_00 in forum Treasure Legends
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Jul 09, 2015, 07:31 AM
  2. Replies: 1
    Last Post: Sep 09, 2014, 02:26 PM
  3. Replies: 15
    Last Post: Aug 13, 2010, 09:41 PM
  4. Columbuss Lost Ships
    By Gypsy Heart in forum Shipwrecks
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: Aug 10, 2006, 08:21 AM
  5. Lost ships off of Corolla NC.
    By pleasurehunter in forum Shipwrecks
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: Sep 25, 2005, 06:24 PM
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.3.0