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Thread: The history of Tayopa

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  1. #136
    mx
    Nov 2004
    Alamos,Sonora,Mexico
    11,329
    2728 times

    Re: The history of Tayopa

    Good morning Annie: I have asked openly for anyone to ask away. However to answer questions sometimes I have to clear up asumptions or data that is incorrect or faulted in any way. This is in no way an insult to anyone, but simply answering the question.

    K To start, you posted -> that you had the data on the site that the Gerrmans had in the 1800's and also the one that Westwood had I asked you to please post them, not in an argumentive mood, but to add to my information base. My Tayopa, I obviously knew.


    You posted -->i dont know what don jose would call it ,but we can say the second tayopa, go to yecora ,then take the road north to la cueva ,continue on to agua blanca ,then to el trigo de cocorepe to la iglesia then to yerbabuena (the orginal name for yerbabuena was ostimuri) to la cieneguita (where the mines are at) on to la amargosa and finally tayopa where ruins are at
    **********
    HI, see first post on South western Chih. for O Annies Tayopa no. 2 NW of Yecora.

    La Trindad was actually Tayopa no. 2 , It is now called --> DIOS Padre --> http://www.goldandsilvermines.com/diosp.htm ================================================== =======================================

    Annie posted --> a topographical map showing the abandoned site tayopa.the tayopa where joseph currys claims are at. this is a government mapping agency map ,available to the public for about four dollars. @ 20 years ago, i went to the inegi office and asked to see the maps south of yecora and in the area east of mesa campanero, in about 30 minutes i walked out with map
    ***************

    If you had had time to read all of the past posts, You would have seen that map had been posted in here in 2007, or there abouts. See first posted map
    ================================================== =======================================

    You posted -->everyone i asked knew where the site was located and it coincided perfectly with dobies info and the topographical map.
    ***************

    Who are everyone? May I ask where and how does it coincide?
    ================================================== =======================================

    You posted > the other tayopa also easily accesible and found on maps just like this one.
    ************
    May I ask you to please show the other one to me?

    Side thingie, Your topo map is incorrect in that Talayotes is wrong, that is Rebaje. The actual Talayotes lies north east from this one. They apparently haven't corrected their mistake. It is interesting to see that they are now using bar code data on the topos.

    On the heavy lines which apparently represent roads, the one going off to the right is not a road, but a line of no identification photographically. The other one going to Rebaje (Talayote) is correct, it passes above the Headquarters down in the little valley, but stops at Rebaje.

    Which route did you take to get to the Tayopa shown on your topo?

    Don Jose de La Mancha
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  2. #137
    mx
    Nov 2004
    Alamos,Sonora,Mexico
    11,329
    2728 times

    Re: The history of Tayopa

    good morning Tank, you posted --> so the thought crossed my mind a road used for 43 years by mission people an by others coming or going threw the area there might be traces of it left ........just a thought
    *********
    A very good thought. Yes the main trail in the rainy season, north to Yecora, etc. passes just north of Tayopa. This is where the famous Grizz lived. See added post for more reference on it. This trail is still being used, although a new road passing by Barbaroccos is being built.

    In the days of Tayopa, it was not used very much hence Tayopa was effectively kept hidden.

    civilization BAH !

    More questions my friend.

    Don Jose de La Mancha
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  3. #138
    mx
    Nov 2004
    Alamos,Sonora,Mexico
    11,329
    2728 times

    Re: The history of Tayopa

    Morning Annie: I was sent an anonymous pm suggesting that I was a bit of an egotist or know it all. On the contrary, I know how much is still to be filled in and have welcomed, encouraged all suggestions and criticisms. I have used those that are applicable, and in turn attempted to correct those that were posted in good faith, but were incorrect. This is wrong?.

    The existing data when I started, was Dobie's story, the disclaimed letter, and The instructions on the 7 Th of March from the Cerro de La Campana. " 10 days in the direction of the setting sun will take you to Tayopa". That still leaves you with a potential of few thousand sq miles to search, in just about as rough a bit of country as is found in the world.

    Regarding Tayopa and it's story, I presume that you know that directly, and indirectly, I am responsible for 'most' of the present data on Tayopa, the Jesuit Plot to take North America away from Spain, and how they clandestinely moved the metal across the north of Mexico to below Matamorros for trans shipment to Rome, etc. I have freely shared this data.

    I have encouraged search for Tayopa no 1

    In other words I do not believe that I am an egotistical / know it all, but then again, do we ever have an unbiased opinion or view of ourselves??
    If I seem to get out of line, call me on it. It would be appreciated.

    Don Jose de La Mancha
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  4. #139

    Apr 2008
    88
    185 times

    Re: The history of Tayopa

    ok don jose ,i apologize if i was out of line ,i really do.. the only thing i did ,was report that, i myself went to tayopa, and i went there using the topographical map that i posted. it satisfied me and the others who went along. when i saw this long drawn out story of what you say you did to finally find the place. i felt i had something to offer to the readers ,showing them how easy it is to get there. when i mentioned in earlier posts that i used modern topos to go to tayopa ,you asked if could i please show them to you. and thats what i did.there is no doubt in my mind we were at the right place. i wanted to show the readers that its not necessary to go to cerro minaca on a certain day and hike 10 days toward the setting sun. or go to nuri and hike up the chino gulch. only go to the state mining office and ask for directions,then buy a map and go. its a lot easier and a lot faster and it takes you to the same place. secondly you say you have proof and posession of information available to no one else ,thats great ,im happy for you. but in a proof is only a hypothesis or a theory until you have in this case eliminated all possibilities that anyone else could or does have any of the private information you posess or any other revelant information concerning the tayopa mission and treasure that you dont have. i doubt that you have been able to exaust that theory enough to be able to call it a fact. and im pertty sure someone might have info on the tayopa treasure that you dont have, thats just a hunch i have. i dont mind being corrected at all ,im only telling the viewers how i went to tayopa, i dont see how you can correct me on that as you werent on the trip.

  5. #140
    mx
    Nov 2004
    Alamos,Sonora,Mexico
    11,329
    2728 times

    Re: The history of Tayopa

    Hola my new friend O Annie: Since I do have data that no-one else has - since I developed them, I know this hehhe - I certainly cannot fault anyone for asking questions or to have a bit of doubt. Obviously I simply cannot post them. However feel free to ask me what ever you wish, keeping in mind, that to a point I can be quite open.

    I am looking forward to your posts since you undoubtedly have a fascinating book of information, and I know intimately the areas that you have so far spoken of..

    Hasta Don Jose de La Mancha
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  6. #141
    mx
    Nov 2004
    Alamos,Sonora,Mexico
    11,329
    2728 times

    Re: The history of Tayopa

    HOLA my Friends: since we had deviated to the Gloria Pan on my search for Tayop,a I will fill in a bit on the varios trips there in the early 50's. As usual I traveled alone
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


    Good afternoon ELLE, jason etc. : for some reason I was thinking about that bell, Tubares, and Your campaign Elle.

    I remembered that I met Lupe vega who helped me with the Gloria pan mine investigation. He arranged for me to go to Jorge Juan's cabin in the Gloria Pan barranca. I had a young couple of Tarahumaras that agreed to act as my guides.

    We went afoot since I was in prime condition and figured that i would have no problem with a young couple, that to me were kiddies, sheesh was I wrong. I left my mule and sleeping gear at Tubares since there was no grazing up there, and carried only 35 lbs - after all, it was only for one day..

    The young couple in their teens, promptly ran up the hill and disappeared. I staggered on trying to catch up with them, near the verge of a heart attack, and finally stumbled over the rim where i had last seen them, I saw them wrestling (?) in the grass. As soon as they saw me, they jumped up laughing, and RAN up to the next crest. This was repeated at least a 'billion' times that first day. sigh

    Then to add to my woes, it started to rain, a cold penetrating rain with wind. sheesh I was beginning to feel sorry for myself and wonder why or how I ever became involved with exploration and lost mines. As for my guides they appeared just as happy as if they had good sense.

    We stayed in a cave that night where I warmed up a bit. The next day was an even worse repetition of the first, if possible. The boy called to me and pointing to a cleft in the ridge above us, fairly close to the Gates of Heaven, and said that was where I had to go. From there it would drop down into the barranca of the Gloria Pan. All that I had to do was to go down the barranca until I saw Jorge Juan's cabin. simple enough, no? As They then 'ran' off giggling and playing, I overheard a remark on how i had slowed them up from a two hour 'walk' to two day one??

    The 'next' Day, about dusk, I finally saw a small one room brush covered shack and stumbled to the door, where with numb fingers I tapped on the door. No response, so I repeated the knocking, still no response, so I started kicking the damn door, it swung open. There was no-one there, so I entered.

    It was by now dark, my matches were wet, and after three days of stumbling through cold gusty rain, continuously wet, I was trembling with cold and beat. All I could think of was getting warm and to sleep. There was just enough light to let me see a broken cot with a sleeping bag on it. Without further ado I crawled into it. sheesh it was so dirty and greasy that it was stiff as a frozen sail , but it did get me warm and I went to sleep listening to the wind howl, shake the cabin, and the roar of the rising arroyo.

    The next morning it was bright and sunny, so after starting a fire and cooking breakfast, I returned to liking the life of an explorer and commenced searching the cabin. it was litterally full of junk, from mining equipment, to books and pages of notes. Being nosey, I quickly found why my unwilling host was gone. He had formented an uprising against the Mission in the 30's, He was called the "Arab". The gov't was still looking for him, There were vague references to a Priest having been killed. He had been involved in several murders and had lately been shot in the stomach, but recovered. This was my unwilling host, sheesh.

    This is your job Elle, check on this.


    Anyway, I quickly found what fit the sealed entrance of La gloria Pan mine and decided to return to El fuerte, where my friend and partner was waiting, so that he could be there when we opened it. That part you already know. About this time an Indian arrived with my sleeping gear, so I returned to Tubares with him.

    Incidentally the return trip only took 1/2 a day ?

    So Elle, dig up what you can about this mini, aborted uprising. But remember, the Gloria Pan was closed in the 1600's, along with Tayopa, Tepoca, Las pimas, LaTarasca, and two others near Caborca.
    This also includes El Fuego de Barras (?) south west of Tubares.

    Side thingie, to the East from the bell tower, on the south side of the river, there is a small rock walled corral. Check it with a metal detector. During the last rev. a gov't pay roll officer, with his escort ,were caught by the rebels and took refuge in there. They were all killed but the pay roll as never found. It is probably buried in there . It was claimed to be mostly gold, but this I doubt, since even a single peso was a large amount of money in those days, still the silver would be worth quite a bit and could go to help restoring the Mission.


    Thank you Jason, as usual it is Elle's fault. This is a fill in for her project.

    Don Jose de La Mancha
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  7. #142
    mx
    Nov 2004
    Alamos,Sonora,Mexico
    11,329
    2728 times

    Re: The history of Tayopa

    Hola mis Amigos : Since we managed to get on the Gloria Pan subject, I will fill in a few posts from another forum on the Tubars /Gloria Pan search.
    ***********************************************

    Good evening my friends: regarding bells, one of the accompanying stories of Tayopa is that one of the resident Jesuits of Tayopa cast bells. This would be in the late 1500's -> early 1600's.

    Aprox. 15 miles to the north of Tayopa, on the same mt range / Mesa, lies the area known as "La Mesa del campanero.- The Mesa of the Bell maker". There are bits of copper slag to be found here and there. Some day I will run down the source of the copper and the other metales used in the bell alloy.

    I originally started looking for Tayopa upon hearing, but not personally seeing, that Yeager, an American mining engineer, had purchased a small hand bell with "Guadalupe de Tayopa "cast on it's rim shortly before dying.. All attempts to locate it were in vain, it had been sent to relatives in Los Angles along with his other personal effects. There the trail seems to have died, I did not persue it since it had served it's purpose of establishing that Tayopa had existed..

    Later while on the trail to a sister lost mine "The Gloria Pan" I ended up at Tubares. The mission had been abandoned, there was no one within miles, but the Church itself was basically intact. It had a brass baptismal bowl with the lid hinged in the center of a brass alloy, approx 4 ft in diameter.

    In the tower, which was separate from the main building, there were 24 small bells. Upon investigating I found two large bells crudely hung at the entrance to the grave yard. approx 200 meters away. They were similar, about 4 ft in dia at the rim.

    I do not remember exactly what was cast on the rims, but one was "In penitence", and the name of a woman with 17?? The other was in the name of a man.

    I later was told by a passing Indian that the original church had been destroyed when the river changed it's course. He also told me that another large bell was in the river bed buried in the sand.

    At that time I was completely alone except for my mule for almost two weeks. Now it has a road and an Indian village there.

    If I can ever find it in my notes, I will post the data and pictures. There are many blank sections of "Bell casting in the Americas".

    Don Jose de La Mancha
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Good afternoon ELLE: no, it doesn't appear to be, but then it has been a few years. he he .

    You posted -->

    "Do you mind if we hook up and try to go locate that large bell in the river bed sand? I'll pay for the expedition, but I'll need you to be the guide!"
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    A) That depends upon many things, some are out of my immediate control. On the trip expenses, no problem, I can easily hold up my own. As for directions, I can tell you more or less where to look, but not exactly, no one can today. The original Church was in the present river channel, in front of the present Church. which was supposedly a convent then. Of course it has been enlarged for the present church.

    The best time for that, is in late June, a window of perhaps two weeks. The Rio Fuerte wasn't called that without reason. I have seen it 100 ft deep and 3/4 of a mile across. Incidentally, this stretch of the river in front of the Church was where I saw that aquatic serpent, of approx. 80 ft, about 1 meter thick . I never swam across the river nude again.

    When I was there, I was looking for the 'SUN' which is on the north side of the river. This played crucial part in proving the existence of the Gloria Pan mine which I eventually found. Long story there.

    After the Indian uprising had been subdued, they were constructing a new mission on top of the ridge to the north, between Tubares and Temoris. It was to be named for one of the priests that had been killed in the uprising. The Jesuits kept in Contact by fires at night, and mirrors in the day.

    Since they had an altar, which had been brought from Michoacan for the new mission, I assume that they also had a bell, which might be interesting. All of these things are stored in the second level of the Gloria Pan mine. Yes, I have found the site of the new Mission, I believe that I am the only one alive that knows of it and where it is. The cut blocks were 2 ft square.

    It is a fascinating area.

    Attached is some interesting data for you to play with. all questions will be happily answered, I have nothing to hide.

    The bell from my Mine, TAYOPA, lies about one day's journey East from Tayopa. It is in a closed tunnel, but I am going to open it soon. I will let you know when I see it.

    Don Jose de La Mancha (Joseph Curry)

    P.S. All of my traveling was done by mule and alone. Not like these swabies in here who only believe in booze, broads, & buckets of Reales.


    Enrique Chacón explicó que "la misión de los tubares fue construida alrededor de 1700-1701; algo interesante es que después de haber abandonado sus sitios arqueológicos, los indígenas regresaron hacia el año de 1767 con la expulsión de los jesuitas. En El Sauzal, los tubares ocuparon el sitio en la época prehispánica y posprehispánica".

    http://www.traveljournals.net/stories/23795.html

    http://www.mexicohorse.com/road_log_...la_reforma.htm

    http://www.panoramio.com/photo/2234054

    Quote---"There’s now a paved road all the way from Creel to Divisadero and on to San Rafael. From San Rafael, there’s a new road *connecting Bahuichivo, Cerocahui, Mesa de Arturo, Piedras Verdes, Tubares (there’s a new bridge over the Río San Miguel), Choix, and on to El Fuerte. Note that you will need a 4WD between Mesa Arturo and Tubares (about 70km). Or you could go from San Rafael to Álamos via Bahuichivo, Témoris and Chinipas, crossing the Río Chinipas, though this road is very rough and assaults have been reported on it, so travel at your own risk
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~

    ELLE LUV: Did those pictures bring back memories, sigh. I was particularly pleased to see the two large bells that I spoke of. The last time that I saw them, they were at the entrance to the grave yard.

    On the grave yard picture, if you project your sight to the back low hill, there is a small cement (local) tank near the bottom with a three step style to enter / leave. There is a tunnel from the grave yard to it, which has a fired brick roof. I don't remember where the northern entrance was, but it could be back tracked. This was a common practice in those days as an escape feature.

    You must remember that it was in 1957 when I was last there. It was completely isolated and alone, no roads. Sigh, how it has changed. It took me 4 days by mule from Chinapas to reach it. 1 day to Temoris, another to La Reforma, another to the home of Agustin Bacera, then another to Tubares.

    As for Ceracahui, it consisted of the Church and 5 houses when I first arrived there. Now even roads. sheesh. Check the church and it's bells for very interesting stories.

    I entered Urique in Feb 1956 returning from a couple of months of exploring the Barranca de Cobre by myself. After 3 days being soaking wet on the trail, I was muddy, unkempt, with a scraggy beard, and as usual in those days, with a .357 S&W magnum pistol at my side. I must have been a pretty sight. In any event, most were drunk on the celebration, and probably never noticed, but gave me a hearty welcome. hhehe. Again, there were probably only a handful of intact houses.

    Now they even have tours from Ceracahui. ??

    When I first passed through that area the Chuihuahua/Pacifica RR was just being started. The only traffic was by air, foot or animal.

    Yes Luv, you have started memories which have been filed away for a bit, to come back.

    Incidentally, I reported that serpent to the University of Chicago I believe, but no action was ever taken. I can imagine where my report was filed. The last that I have head is that they were strictly fish eaters. Delectable human females are apparently not on their preferred diet. I often wonder if there are any of the serpents left. The Fuete river, where the bell is, was originally full of Alligators also, but now long gone.

    You mentioned only 1 hr from Tubares?? Where and doing what? (me nosey)

    SORRY Scuba, it's all her fault !! heheheh

    Don Jose de La mancha
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~

    Good morning Scuba: sigh, nice clean, labor of love, my friend. Beats riding a mule in a deep canyon with the temp around 140 F, no breeze, face, eyes and mouth full of lil sweat flies, soaking wet, smelling more like the mule, than the mule itself. Ellie love knows what I am talking of.

    Don Jose de La Mancha

    p.s. now that I think of it, do you suppose that smelling like my lovely mule was the reason that most of the interesting females that I met at the various ranches weren't interested in me??

    p.p.s coral cuts soon heal, saddle sores and bruised ego
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Pirates were not very nice people, this comes as a shock to those like me, that were raised on the romantic versions of the Errol Flyn movies. sigh

    There was nothing humane or sporting in piracy. They thought nothing of slaughtering an entire crew just for fun or simply to leave no witnesses.

    The normal method for figting on a ship was to simply form a line from one side of the ship to the other, then move forward with the line slashing and chopping with their meat cleavers. There was no opponent, no matter how good a swordsman that he may be, that had the slightest chance.

    No, a pirate was not a nice fellow, a pirates life for me? nah !

    hmmmm on second thought this is the 'one way' that I could carry off La Fair Elle to my secret tropical island - to smell the night blooming Jasmine in the jungle naturally

    Don Jose de La Mancha (el former Chaste Saint)






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  8. #143

    Apr 2008
    88
    185 times

    Re: The history of Tayopa

    hello don jose ,i realize the map you posted is not to scale but there are errors. the tayopa mine shown west of mulatos should be east of mulatos and south of dolores, i gave directions posted here the other day to get there, i have visited here also, its a very interesting site ,and merits investigation, about many old high grade silver mines, there is also high a flat mesa just north ,that sits as a barren saddle between two mountains rich in gold. i have read reports that the whole hill ran 10 to 12 dollars when gold was 18 dollars per ounce. . placer gold can be found in all the rivulets that drain it. some old people call that barren saddle paramo, the correct translation for paramo in english is moor. a barren flat area usually above tree line. im not insuinating anything ,just reporting my experiences. the tayopa mission there is in ruins, its just east of the silver mines. . the tayopa you have penciled in is the same one in the topographical map i posted,and the one you have claims at.actually these were the first ones we visited. as far as private information ,isnt it possible that some other person has information and that they have obtained in the same way , say two scientists inventing a vaccine at the same time in different parts of the world?i think that is within the realm of probability . there are two other locations named tayopa one south of huachinera,very,very interesting and one in a narrow arroyo 400 meters distant from guaynopa. for those that are interested . none of these sites are now and never were lost, meaning the people living in the area are full aware of their existence, as well as government agencies. only the tayopa south of huachinera ,it does not appear anywhere, and is difficult to find, this is the one the apache people spoke of. it looks like the place was abandonded hastily, and it is rumored that quite a few silver bars were found here. there is also evidence of a landslide.and there are documents giving compass cordinates for a mine location named as tayopa and visited by explorers that is completely out of sync with all others ,although reports document the mine as tayopa ,this mine i couldnt find it ,i couldnt adjust for the magnetic north variation and how it would have moved over a period of time say 200 years. but it might /could be close to nacori chico ,or the coordinates could be wrong.

  9. #144
    mx
    Nov 2004
    Alamos,Sonora,Mexico
    11,329
    2728 times

    Re: The history of Tayopa

    Good morning my Friend OA: An excellent post. You mentioned -->old people call that barren saddle paramo, the correct translation for paramo in english is moor. a barren flat area usually above tree line.
    ************
    That is correct , a paramo is also a deserted or extremely rough area.
    In the case of your Paramo, it could well be an old bench placer since it lies between two hills. If so, that would explain why it could be so rich.
    CHECK IT OUT!
    ================================================== =======================================

    OA, You posted --> as far as private information ,isnt it possible that some other person has information and that they have obtained in the same way , say two scientists inventing a vaccine at the same time in different parts of the world?i think that is within the realm of probability
    ************
    Of course, In fact when I was exploring and experimenting in the parnormal, I found that was quite common through involuntary telepathy.
    ================================================== =======================================

    OA you posted -->the tayopa you have penciled in is the same one in the topographical map i posted
    ***************
    Mostly from your description of your trip from Yecora.
    ================================================== =======================================

    OA you posted --> i couldnt adjust for the magnetic north variation and how it would have moved over a period of time say 200 years.
    ****************

    for declention / variation --->http://www.resurgentsoftware.com/geomag.html

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetic_declination scroll down to animated picture on right.


    Don Jose de La Mancha
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  10. #145
    mx
    Nov 2004
    Alamos,Sonora,Mexico
    11,329
    2728 times

    Re: The history of Tayopa

    Good evening, was busy for a few days. I am posting a few pictures with few words, that will come tomorrow.

    On the picture of the broken country, notice the altimeter in the Aircraft, 6000 ft on the nose. Dejuicy will have his work cut out for him..

    On the trail from Yokivo, this is where Dobie supposedly camped and met the mule drivers with the fresh roasting corn. One of them walked out to the point and blew his cow horn bugle listening for the three echos. Also the home of the giant grizzly Bear.

    The one of my Tiger hugging a tree for energy or to get cured, is an old Indian trick - it really works. This is the grizzly's country.

    Don Jose de La Mancha
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  11. #146
    um
    Nemo me impune lacesset

    Jan 2005
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    Re: The history of Tayopa

    I LOVE the photos amigo, more please!

    That tree which El Tigre is hugging for an energy boost (that really works? I will have to try it!) is it by any chance one of those mysterious Guerigo trees that I keep bugging you about? It is not terribly important and I realize it, but until I can actually see one in person this little mystery will keep me wondering, particularly because it was thought to be an important clue to locating Tayopa.

    6000 feet elevation - how cold does it get at night there? What are the winters like there? Does it ever get buried in snows? Not important questions of course, just more curiosity on my part.

    One last thing; I must give you a good scolding Don Jose'! You were "absent from class" here, how could you spend your time on such things other than educating us! Just kidding of course, but I do look forward to your replies, and to those of our amigos here.
    Roy
    SUPPORT THE BEEF INDUSTRY - EAT BEEF
    "We must find a way, or we will make one."--Hannibal Barca

  12. #147
    mx
    Nov 2004
    Alamos,Sonora,Mexico
    11,329
    2728 times

    Re: The history of Tayopa

    Good morning Oro & my friends: You posted -->You were "absent from class" here, how could you spend your time on such things other than educating us!
    **************
    My apologies Oro, but something came up that required/s my immediate attention, it applies to the finishing up of the Tayopa campaign. I will be asking your advice.

    Don Jose de La Mancha
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  13. #148
    um
    Nemo me impune lacesset

    Jan 2005
    DAKOTA TERRITORY
    Tesoro Lobo Supertraq, (95%) Garrett Scorpion (5%)
    5,769
    1854 times

    Re: The history of Tayopa

    I was just yanking your chain buddy, I do realize there are other things which demand our time. I hope that I can give useful opinion or ideas for you, but keep in mind that in my view you are the expert here amigo.

    Have to sign off, will return this evening,
    Roy
    SUPPORT THE BEEF INDUSTRY - EAT BEEF
    "We must find a way, or we will make one."--Hannibal Barca

  14. #149
    us
    Aug 2010
    Phoenix
    192
    1 times

    Re: The history of Tayopa

    Just read this whole thing.
    Awesome!! It makes a person wish he could be there just for the thrill of it all. The adventure, the discoveries - I get the "Oro" bubblies just thinking about it.

    More Please!

    Jerry
    Oroblanco likes this.
    Always one step ahead...

  15. #150
    mx
    Nov 2004
    Alamos,Sonora,Mexico
    11,329
    2728 times

    Re: The history of Tayopa

    good morning Jerry, I apologize for the absence, but it involves clearing up a contract with one of the side mines that I found while on the Tayopa campaign. This business must be cleared up for the next step on Tayopa. - -> $$$.

    I will post on La Tarasca & La Pimas mines later today, then on the Gloria Pan, and Tepoca. They were important in proving that the Tayopa 'did' exist and was worth the time, effort, and loss of income to follow it up.

    Don Jose de La Mancha
    Oroblanco likes this.
    "I exist to live, not live to exist"

 

 
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