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Thread: Misc data and adventures of a Tayopa treasure hunter

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  1. #7171

    Mar 2015
    552
    3050 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Hello All

    Hardluck told me a funny story.

    People perceive finding treasure is more like the treasure adventure moves? They have this amazing adventure defeat the baddy get the treasure and sail off with a girl into the sunset?

    The reality is more like a TV series. Endless court room challenges and dramas. Self interest groups with nothing better to than cry cultural patrimony. Various parties all wanting a cut with lawyers circling around the finder like if he is carcass. And the girl has gone off with lawyers to diner leaving you the poor finder with the left overs.

    Coffee?

    Kanacki
    Last edited by KANACKI; Mar 14, 2019 at 05:38 PM.

  2. #7172
    it
    Sep 2016
    Mexico
    1,510
    6561 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Hi, in Mexico basically it is 50/50 on private land if you have permision , 100% to the landowner if you don't. Same for fed lands but it is tricky.even with permission.

  3. #7173

    Mar 2015
    552
    3050 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Quote Originally Posted by Real of Tayopa View Post
    Hi, in Mexico basically it is 50/50 on private land if you have permision , 100% to the landowner if you don't. Same for fed lands but it is tricky.even with permission.
    Hello Don Jose

    Its same in many countries although each country has different interpretations of treasure trove laws. Some depend on the age of item etc.. In South America they do not give a dam about colonial relics. However if native get thee to scaffold. :-) Ironic as revisionists seem want write out their colonial past. The is real danger of revisionist history can be manipulated to suit the in favor agenda of the day.

    That can flow onto policy making in regards to treasure trove laws.

    If possible the less you have to do with bureaucrats the better?

    For example in the process of stating in non incriminating terms the person or persons involved? Get my drift? :-)

    There is certain "some one" who pulled fast one late last year. Masterminded in one country circumvented the laws in another. Purchased a property by proxy. Discovered treasure resold the property inflated the value of property in calculation of the treasure on the property. Then organised international monetary transactions through various accounts then divide shares among those involved.

    No treasure laws was violated. No treasure was removed. Thus the discovery became the discretion of the new property owner. Who paid for the property that had treasure discounted enough for him to make a nice profit also. If he should chose to make the discovery public.

    Thus the treasure trove law not allowing foreigners to benefit from treasure was technically circumvented. Not one bureaucrat was involved in fact none of them was even aware the deal had taken place. the entire transaction was done deal in two weeks, And a few locals involved was paid off.

    Of course when a few locals became flush with cash inevitably some one will spill the beans. The local mayor got wind of matter and made an attempt to get a cut. Other wise he was going to make a big stink. However he got flown out to another country, fed booze and wild women then shunted off back to hole he crawled out from. left wondering with no proof because people who was in the know wasn't talking.

    They was too busy counting their money. :-)

    Kanacki

  4. #7174
    us
    Feb 2010
    1,104
    1171 times
    Kanacki, I enjoyed your tale of the Texans and the Drumbeat. When my Dad went into the Navy in WW2, I don't think he'd ever even been on a row boat. His first three days aboard ship at sea, he was so sick he "couldn't hit his butt with both hands at the same time". A kind cook gave him crackers and apple slices that he was able to keep down. He was sick until his ship made contact with a German U Boat and the General Quarters alarm sounded. His Battle station was at a hatch to pass Hedgehogs (a projectile kind of like a mortar round, they weighed like 70 pounds) up to the deck. He was passing them, one in each hand as fast as he could. After that he wasn't sick another day. That included a Typhoon on Christmas Day of 45' off the Aleutian Islands of Alaska.
    Hope you and Mi Major keep the tales coming. Good luck.

  5. #7175

    Mar 2015
    552
    3050 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Quote Originally Posted by uglymailman View Post
    Kanacki, I enjoyed your tale of the Texans and the Drumbeat. When my Dad went into the Navy in WW2, I don't think he'd ever even been on a row boat. His first three days aboard ship at sea, he was so sick he "couldn't hit his butt with both hands at the same time". A kind cook gave him crackers and apple slices that he was able to keep down. He was sick until his ship made contact with a German U Boat and the General Quarters alarm sounded. His Battle station was at a hatch to pass Hedgehogs (a projectile kind of like a mortar round, they weighed like 70 pounds) up to the deck. He was passing them, one in each hand as fast as he could. After that he wasn't sick another day. That included a Typhoon on Christmas Day of 45' off the Aleutian Islands of Alaska.
    Hope you and Mi Major keep the tales coming. Good luck.
    Hello uglymailman

    Its my pleasure sharing some yarns.

    My hats off to your dad and in fact anyone who served in the big red one in all parts of the world.

    Kanacki

  6. #7176
    it
    Sep 2016
    Mexico
    1,510
    6561 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    oh the tales I could tell you about interference and politicians sigh and likewise protecting the patrimony, but is to my best interests to keep quiet.

  7. #7177
    us
    Mar 2011
    N/W ARKANSAS
    FISHER
    2,366
    8222 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Quote Originally Posted by KANACKI View Post
    Hello Don Jose

    Its same in many countries although each country has different interpretations of treasure trove laws. Some depend on the age of item etc.. In South America they do not give a dam about colonial relics. However if native get thee to scaffold. :-) Ironic as revisionists seem want write out their colonial past. The is real danger of revisionist history can be manipulated to suit the in favor agenda of the day.

    That can flow onto policy making in regards to treasure trove laws.

    If possible the less you have to do with bureaucrats the better?

    For example in the process of stating in non incriminating terms the person or persons involved? Get my drift? :-)

    There is certain "some one" who pulled fast one late last year. Masterminded in one country circumvented the laws in another. Purchased a property by proxy. Discovered treasure resold the property inflated the value of property in calculation of the treasure on the property. Then organised international monetary transactions through various accounts then divide shares among those involved.

    No treasure laws was violated. No treasure was removed. Thus the discovery became the discretion of the new property owner. Who paid for the property that had treasure discounted enough for him to make a nice profit also. If he should chose to make the discovery public.

    Thus the treasure trove law not allowing foreigners to benefit from treasure was technically circumvented. Not one bureaucrat was involved in fact none of them was even aware the deal had taken place. the entire transaction was done deal in two weeks, And a few locals involved was paid off.

    Of course when a few locals became flush with cash inevitably some one will spill the beans. The local mayor got wind of matter and made an attempt to get a cut. Other wise he was going to make a big stink. However he got flown out to another country, fed booze and wild women then shunted off back to hole he crawled out from. left wondering with no proof because people who was in the know wasn't talking.

    They was too busy counting their money. :-)

    Kanacki

    Hi all.

    I always make the same agreement with land owners for permission to hunt their property.

    When I am done, I lay out all of my finds and he gets to pick up the one piece that he wants, then I do the same.
    We repeat the process until it is all gone, or one of us has all the things that we want to keep.

    That keeps it fair for all.
    I have kept my agreement forms with names and phone numbers, so that I can call them back for a reference when approaching a new land owner.

    We both sign it. Where the landowners sign, their is a statement that I have their permission to be there, and it goes on to say that if a neighbor has concerns that they can call them to confirm that I am there with permission.

    As for public land.... That’s a bit different.

    I have actually been able to stake a claim on the edge of a state park, for the GPAA! With one restriction, that we don’t undermine a trail along the edge of the creek. The trail runs from a parking area to a cave.

    I had to call five different people to get it done but it was worth it.

    It was a civil war camp and there is still plenty to dig for.

    A year or so afterwards, I was testing my design for a self contained hand powered suction dredge.

    I was standing in about a foot deep edge of the water and trying to check it out as to what it would capture.

    I had tossed out three of my teaching nugglets that are pieces of 22 bullets that were shot into a sandy bank and recovered and painted with “ metallic gold “ paint.

    They look real and will find their way to the bottom of a gold pan!

    Kids that I have taught to pan , that see them in the pan are hooked for life.

    Back to the story...
    while I was testing the dredge, a Young man in uniform came down to where I was and said “ You know that you cannot keep anything that you find there, right?
    I finished drawing up my three nugglets , turned around and opened the dredge, collected my my pieces and said “actually, yes I can, I have a claim and you need to read the mining laws of 1849.”
    I dumped the rest of the heavy junk back in the creek, as I walked past him while still scratching his head about my answer and dropped one of my pretty little golden nugglets in his hand and the other two, into my pocket!
    I didn’t tell him that they were fake.

    I sometimes wonder what he did with it!!!!

    #/;0{>~
    ....JESUS IS LORD.
    ...................THE BIBLE IS GOD'S WORD.
    .................................. HEAVEN IS MY REAL HOME.


    THAT'S JUST THE WAY I WAS RAISED TO SEE THE WORLD.

    REALLY, I'M NOT SHOUTING. I HAVE A VISUAL PERCEPTION PROBLEM, AND TYPING IN ALL CAPS HELPS ME TO PROOF READ WHAT I TYPE. IF I EVER NEED TO DRAW ATTENTION TO ANYTHING I'LL MAKE IT BOLD SO IT STANDS OUT. I MEAN NO HARM. #/;0)~

  8. #7178
    ec
    May 2013
    Ecuador, America
    1,610
    2350 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Truly the journey that is reward enough. Time outdoors, meeting new people, new experiences and sometimes new cultures in strange lands.

  9. #7179

    Mar 2015
    552
    3050 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Hello All

    Grab a coffee here is yarn for you.

    All seasoned treasure hunters knows the old saying where there,s treasure evil is never far away.

    A world class marine explorer, Bermudian Teddy Tucker is internationally considered one of the most preeminent in his field.

    The son of architect Edward Tucker, Mr Tucker’s first job was at the Bermuda Aquarium which started his passion for the ocean. He has been exploring the ocean’s buried treasures since the late 1940’s.

    In his decades long career he discovered over 100 historic shipwrecks in Bermuda waters, found numerous sunken treasures, was featured in international films and magazines and served as a consultant worldwide.

    World renowned for his treasure hunting, Teddy Tucker has found numerous treasures including; gold bars, silver coins, swivel guns, ancient hand grenades, brass dividers, timing glasses, brass cylinders, bronze mortars, pewter plates, porringers, pottery cruets, and Carib Indian weapons.

    The May 9, 1965 issue of an American newspaper [The Herald-Journal] quotes Mr. Tucker as saying he had made close to $500,000 from his finds to that date – which was over forty years ago.

    His most famous find is considered one of the most valuable pieces of sunken treasure ever found. The emerald studded 22 karat gold Tucker Cross was discovered by Teddy Tucker in 1955. It is believed to have come from ‘San Pedro’, a Spanish galleon which was lost on the reefs in 1594. He sold it to the Government of Bermuda in 1959 saying “he wanted it to remain on the island forever.”

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    However that forever was short lived? Once again my friends remember the quote about treasure and evil?

    In 1975, just before an official visit by Queen Elizabeth II to the Maritime Museum to view the treasure, it was discovered that somehow the Tucker Cross had been stolen and a replica left in its place.

    Local lore says that due to the type of the theft, and by the cunning plan of using a replica to disguise the theft rather then "simply" just stealing it. The thief was most likely not a Bermudian, but rather an international art thief.

    Despite an investigation which reputedly involved the Bermuda Police, FBI, Scotland Yard and Interpol the original has never been recovered, and the crime remains one of both Bermudas greatest unsolved mysteries.

    No one to this day knows the where about of the original in which the value would be priceless.


    pssss want to buy a cross? er just kidding. :-)

    Coffee.

    Kanacki
    Last edited by KANACKI; Mar 16, 2019 at 06:44 PM.

  10. #7180

    Mar 2015
    552
    3050 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    While we think of lost treasure being ancient.

    In fact lost treasure is be created all the time. Even in our lifetime. The 20th century with the upheaval of two world wars and the great depression was powerful motives to hide money and gold. There is another motive to hide treasure from the proceeds of crime. While one would argue why would thief go to all trouble stealing some thing then just hide it?

    It comes down to several reasons. One you suddenly appear to be cashed up and it is noticed by your people in street living around you. Can raise a red flag. Walking up to car dealers show room paying cash for an expensive car raises that flag too? And what if the item is famous and well know like a work of art or piece of famous jewelry etc...who will buy it or as they say in trade fence it? Not so easy! Especially with criminals because most of the time they already have records so its in their best interest to hide such valuables until they are able to convert it into cash. So you can see the motive to hide items until a buyer is found?

    Yet some criminals have a multilayered life of crime and even if they have hidden some thing they might get arrested for some thing else and go to jail and though one circumstance after another being unable to return for their hidden stolen loot.

    I have another yarn for you.

    You know there are some criminals have brilliant cunning plans to steal loot but then post theft do incredibly stupid things to get themselves caught? The more involved the more chances one of criminal will slip up.

    Coffee to be continued...

    Kanacki

  11. #7181

    Mar 2015
    552
    3050 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Hello All

    Grab a some of Don Jose famous sock coffee and pull up seat I have an interesting yarn for you. In regards to proceeds of crime becoming modern buried loot. The following story is from recently as 2005.

    Although a crime is crime you some times have to admire audacity of some criminals. Have any of you heard about the Banco Central robbery in Fortaleza, Brazil?

    Banco Central robbery in Fortaleza, Brazil.

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    The Guinness Book of World Records awarded this heist the title of "greatest robbery of a bank," and the plot sounds like something straight out of a movie.

    At 6 p.m. on Friday, August 6, 2005, in downtown Fortaleza, Avenida Dom Manuel was packed with Brazilians racing home to shower and eat before crowding into the beach huts lining the boardwalk of this coastal city. Little did they know, 13 feet beneath the asphalt, honking and clatter, one of the greatest heists in history was already underway.

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    The haul from the Banco Central was 165 million reais — roughly $70 million USD all in 50 real bills that had been set aside for sorting to determine which notes were damaged and needed to be destroyed. Stacked up, they would have reached 108 feet and weighed a ton. So it would’ve been a massive task to get them through the 260-foot-long tunnel that led from the serrated hole in the ceramic floor of the bank, under the avenue and into the back of a store a block away.

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    Three months earlier, the robbers rented their cover, a store they fronted with a farcically parochial sign: “Synthetic Grass.” When questioned later, neighbors recalled not thinking much of the new business, or the trucks filled with 30 tons of dirt that drove in and out for weeks. When bank employees discovered what had happened on Monday, the criminals (police say 25 were involved) were already divided into 11 cars headed in different directions throughout Brazil, and the details that emerged shocked the nation.

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    The tunnel they had dug, filling all those truckloads, was a masterful engineering project: 28 inches in diameter, complete with wooden beams, ladders, plastic lining, wiring and even an air-conditioning and ventilation system. The cash had been pulled manually through the tunnel — which police estimated had cost nearly $200,000 to construct — via basins secured to ropes squeaking through a pulley system.

    It would appear they’d thought of everything: Outside, police would later find a large amount of white powder — chalk the robbers had used to cover their fingerprints. And they nearly succeeded, except for one print, their first slip.

    The second mistake? A member of the gang bought 10 cars at once the next day, paying cash and raising red flags in this poor region of Brazil. Improbably, the police managed to catch up with the trailer carrying those cars in another state, and inside three of the vehicles were bundles of 50 real bills.

    The nabbed man squealed, taking down the group. As with most heists, they’d had an inside man — a bank employee who’d tipped them off to the location of motion sensors, alarms and the fact that the cameras filmed but did not record. The biggest shock? The mayor of Boa Viagem, a podunk town south of Fortaleza, was also in on it, and had fronted some of the money to build the tunnel, which made the town an attractive hideout for many of the suspects.

    Three dozen of them were accused, and 26 ended up in jail — for 133 crimes. “Armadillo,” nicknamed for his digging skills, was nabbed at his favorite bakery in São Paulo and sentenced to 17 years, later reduced to two. “Big Boss,” the tunnel’s engineer, escaped prison in 2011 and is still on the run. But things may have turned out best for those stuck in prison. While on the lam, “Little Fernando” was kidnapped, held for ransom and killed, his bullet-riddled body found on a rural roadside.

    The fallout of the decade-old crime, in fact, is still playing out. The ringleader, aka “The German,” was arrested in Brasília three years later and slapped with a lengthy sentence; more recently, a judge found him guilty of money laundering and tacked on another 80 years. Antônio Reginaldo de Araujo, who police believe had become a narcotrafficking kingpin of a São Paulo neighborhood, escaped jail on Father’s Day last year, but was recaptured this summer driving a car stocked with cocaine and cell phones.

    In the end, 20 million of the 165 million reais — about $8 million of the $70 million — were recouped, leaving little hope any more will be found. According to the police chief in charge of the investigation, Antônio Celso dos Santos, “there’s no way to recover more of the money” now that so much time has passed. Some say the bills are buried in the desert?

    Clearly amigos much of money has been disbursed. But I have no doubt for the ones still in prison or have already been murdered that there is still caches hidden all over Brazil perhaps over 50 million.

    No doubt in years to come there will be a whole host of treasure hunters in the future looking for some of the proceeds of that crime?

    Coffee anyone?

    Kanacki
    Last edited by KANACKI; Mar 17, 2019 at 03:16 AM.

  12. #7182

    Mar 2015
    552
    3050 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Hello my friends its wet day.

    So with out much to do I am lurking here posting some yarns. Is there any sleuths among you out there? Perhaps smart enough to take down a missing treasure. There is 5 million reward offered?

    The art world is strange beast my friends as few really understand art? The optimist view is artwork is appreciated for artwork itself. The Cynic will say the artwork is front for the very wealthy to hide money from the tax department. Think about how many large corporations in their foyers have very expensive artworks in them or owned by them but on loan to museums and art galleries as patrons of those. How does one determine a price for such artworks? So in effect art is like an artificial currency like bitcoin.

    Yet some artworks are supposedly worth hundreds of millions. Cynics say art is used like bitcoin as artificial current to hide assets from taxable income. Authorities look the other way because all Ceo's, Politicians and most influential people hide their money in plain site under the mask of arts and culture?

    Have any of you heard about The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum robbery in Boston?

    On March 18, 1990, two men disguised as police officers walked into the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston and told the security guard they were responding to a call. The guard let them enter, but once inside, they handcuffed that guard and a second one, and locked them in the basement.

    They got away with 13 extremely valuable pieces of art worth $500 million, including Rembrandt’s "Storm on the Sea of Galilee" (1633),

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    "A Lady and Gentleman in Black" (1633)

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    and a self portrait from 1634; Vermeer’s "The Concert" (1658–1660);

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    Govaert Flinck’s "Landscape with an Obelisk" (1638);

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    five Edgar Degas’ impressionist works; and Edouard Manet’s "Chez Tortoni" (1878–1880).

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    To this day, no one knows who the robbers were or where they hid the goods from the largest theft of private property in history. Empty frames hang in the museum as placeholders for when the stolen works are returned. The Gardner Museum is offering a $5 million reward for information leading to the recovery of these works in good condition.

    Anyone seeking answers to this treasure trove of art should ask themselves who would have the capacity to buy such artworks to begin with?

    Coffee?

    Kanacki
    Last edited by KANACKI; Mar 17, 2019 at 03:06 AM.

  13. #7183

    Mar 2015
    552
    3050 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Hello all

    Contionuing the yarn of boston art theft?

    According to the FBI, the stolen artwork was moved through the region and offered for sale in Philadelphia during the early 2000s. They believe the thieves were members of a criminal organization based in the mid-Atlantic and New England. They also claim to have targeted two suspects, although they have not been publicly identified and are now deceased.

    Boston gangster Bobby Donati, murdered in 1991 as a result of ongoing gang wars, has been cited as a possible collaborator in the heist.

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    Significant evidence suggests that Hartford, Connecticut gangster Robert Gentile knows the location of the works, although he denies involvement. Robert Gentile is an old man now in jail unable to walk. However he is not talking.

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    The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) took control of the case on the grounds that the artwork would likely cross state lines. They have conducted hundreds of interviews with probes stretching across the world involving Scotland Yard, Japanese and French authorities, private investigators, museum directors, and art dealers.

    The FBI believes the thieves were members of a criminal organization based in the mid-Atlantic and New England, and that the stolen paintings were moved through Connecticut and the Philadelphia area in the years following the theft. Some of the art may have been offered for sale in Philadelphia in the early 2000s, including The Storm on the Sea of Galilee; however, their knowledge of what happened to the works after the attempted sale is limited.

    The FBI stated it believed it knew the identity of the thieves in 2013, but in 2015 announced that they were now deceased. They have declined to identify the individuals.

    Here is drawing of 2 of men involved below.

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    The FBI believe the thieves were amateur criminals, not experts commissioned to steal particular works. Some investigators believe the works were destroyed, explaining why they have not reappeared?

    Theories on the theft include that it was organized by the Irish Republican Army in order to raise money or bargain for the release of imprisoned comrades. Another theory states Whitey Bulger was the ringleader of the theft. At the time of the heist, he was Boston's top crime boss and an FBI informant.

    But at the end of the day there are only theories?

    However the way some paints was torn from the frames do suggest amateurs as damaging the painting decreases the resale value of the painting. And the fact 16th century painting are extremely fragile as the paint cracks and peels over time if not kept in climate control environment. I do not think for one moment that paintings have been destroyed as it defeats the purpose?

    However it may be possible hidden in some ones attic or in a storage locker valuable paintings worth about 500 million could be still hidden somewhere?

    Where my friends is 500 million dollar question? And a 5 million dollar reward for the answer?

    Coffee anyone?

    Kanacki
    Last edited by KANACKI; Mar 17, 2019 at 02:58 AM.

  14. #7184
    Charter Member
    us
    "WP"

    May 2012
    12,005
    17322 times
    Ahh , notable loot of thieves.
    Spaggiari and the Nice (in France) bank job in 1976.
    An interesting job with the contents of 400 safety deposit boxes.
    An ex girlfriend of one gang member set the previously puzzled police in motion with a tip. (And a single fingerprint had been obtained earlier as well. )

    [None of the proceeds of the robbery were ever found.]
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert_Spaggiari

  15. #7185

    Mar 2015
    552
    3050 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Hello all

    in regards to Bobby Donati In recent years, however, he has been identified as the mastermind behind the 1990 theft of art worth $500 million from Boston's Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, the largest art theft ever; there are some accounts that link his death to that crime instead.

    It has been reported that Donati stole the art in an attempt to get his boss, Vincent M. Ferrara, released from jail in order to ensure he would not be killed by the rival faction, which was gaining control of the Patriarca family at that time. The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), which had him under heavy surveillance at the time of his death, has not seemed interested in him as a suspect in the theft, which it is still investigating.

    the story goes....

    No suspects have ever been officially named in the killing, although the files of a state assistant attorney general involved in organized-crime investigations at that time list David Turner, a member of the Patriarca faction loyal to Salemme who has also been suspected of involvement in the Gardner theft, as perhaps having committed the crime.

    It is believed by law enforcement that Donati was likely murdered by other mobsters loyal to Salemme, possibly in retaliation for involvement, actual or perceived, in the failed attempt on their boss's life two years earlier. Donati was the second of six mob figures killed during the early 1990s.

    Many of the victims' bodies were found, as he was, in the trunks of their vehicles, a common Mafia practice to indicate the killing was related to the victim's criminal activities. William Youngworth, an antiques dealer and mob associate who in 1997 led a reporter to what may have been one of the stolen Gardner paintings, hidden in a Brooklyn warehouse, claimed at that time that Donati was on the verge of being made when he was killed, and killing a made man requires his boss's approval.

    In mob culture in the American Mafia and Sicilian Mafia, a made man is a fully initiated member of the Mafia (though the Sicilian Mafia itself refers to such individuals as men of honor in the Italian or Sicilian language). To become "made," an associate first has to be sponsored by another made man.

    An inductee will be required to take the oath of Omertà, the mafia code of silence. After the induction ceremony, the associate becomes a "made man" and holds the rank of soldier (Italian: soldato) in the Mafia hierarchy.

    Was Bobby Donati connected to 500 million dollar heist? And what of the dodgy William Youngworth, an antiques dealer? who lead a reporter to Brooklyn warehouse?

    What many people do not understand in Europe art theft has long connection to Mafia clans?

    Why you ask?

    Because while art is for rich a tax evasion scheme for criminals like the Mafia it is an insurance policy. Many Mafia figure pay big money for these masterpieces not because of the great art but as insurance policy? It my friends comes down to Italian law?

    If they are caught with their dealing in prostitution murder drug smuggling extortion etc.. and go to jail, there is a loop hole in Italian law they can reduce their prison sentence if they reveal missing cultural patrimony in deal with authorities. This has become an insurance policy for criminals to lower their prison sentences.

    So in effect the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston heist reeks of a Mafia connection?

    Perhaps the key to missing paintings is connected to hidden depository in Brooklyn warehouse awaiting for some lucky discoverer years to come?

    Kanacki
    Last edited by KANACKI; Mar 17, 2019 at 02:55 AM.

 

 

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chilacote

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content

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edwin tanguma

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fort in hull ma
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lupe tayopa
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mina el peligro en gloriapan
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picture of a mule load of 8 reales tar was recovered

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real de tayopa
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tayopa treasure

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tayopa treasure treasure net

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