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Thread: 430 / Good for 5˘ in trade

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  1. #1

    Oct 2016
    South St Paul, MN
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    430 / Good for 5˘ in trade

    Just got one that's a mystery to me. I'm not great at searching token catalog, but I tried, and didn't find anything. All it says on one side is the numbers "430" Doesn't appear to be an address. Any ideas? (found near St Paul, MN)


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    gold boy, trdking, 1637 and 2 others like this.

  2. #2
    Charter Member
    us
    Oct 2014
    Massachusetts
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    Very interesting token!
    Inspector likes this.

  3. #3

    Aug 2003
    2,062
    997 times
    IB - here's the writeup I did several years ago on numbered tokens: This particular type of token was used as a payout from slot machines used all over the U.S. and probably Canada as well. The number represents a "route" of slot machines owned by a particular operator. The machines were set up to receive nickels (no hole) and pay out tokens (hole) when a winning combination came up. The tokens could then be used to purchase candy, cigars, etc. from the cigar store or pool hall where the machine was placed. Periodically, the route man would come around to service the machine, refill it with tokens, remove the nickels from the money box, and then settle up with the business owner. Every token (with the right number) that the business had received for selling merchandise would go back into the machine. The business knew in advance not to take tokens with the wrong number as the route man would not give very much money for them. I suppose there were "exchanges" in some areas where the route operators exchanged tokens to get them back to the right route operator. Tokens that customers carried out (like the one you found) equaled profit for the operator and the business. The business received a pre-agreed percentage of the take. Unfortunately we probably will never find out who and where the numbers represent. It should be noted that there are similar numbered tokens without the hole that were used in machines designed differently. Such tokens were in common use ca. ~1910-40.

    John in the Great 208

  4. #4

    Oct 2016
    South St Paul, MN
    XP Deus, 11" and 5x8" HF coils Minelab Equinox 800
    990
    1295 times
    Metal Detecting
    Honorable Mentions (1)
    Quote Originally Posted by idahotokens View Post
    IB - here's the writeup I did several years ago on numbered tokens: This particular type of token was used as a payout from slot machines used all over the U.S. and probably Canada as well. The number represents a "route" of slot machines owned by a particular operator. The machines were set up to receive nickels (no hole) and pay out tokens (hole) when a winning combination came up. The tokens could then be used to purchase candy, cigars, etc. from the cigar store or pool hall where the machine was placed. Periodically, the route man would come around to service the machine, refill it with tokens, remove the nickels from the money box, and then settle up with the business owner. Every token (with the right number) that the business had received for selling merchandise would go back into the machine. The business knew in advance not to take tokens with the wrong number as the route man would not give very much money for them. I suppose there were "exchanges" in some areas where the route operators exchanged tokens to get them back to the right route operator. Tokens that customers carried out (like the one you found) equaled profit for the operator and the business. The business received a pre-agreed percentage of the take. Unfortunately we probably will never find out who and where the numbers represent. It should be noted that there are similar numbered tokens without the hole that were used in machines designed differently. Such tokens were in common use ca. ~1910-40.

    John in the Great 208
    Thanks for the awesome reply, John. Always great to get your input!
    Inspector likes this.

 

 

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