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Thread: Trasure... South Atlantic Island 700 mile East of Brazil "Trindade Island" ?

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  1. #16
    Charter Member

    Jun 2015
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    As always, glad for your input Kanacki. You help shed some light on matters that are not so well known, or diluted by others.

  2. #17

    Apr 2003
    51
    46 times
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    I wouldn't worry about it too much. It was just a version of an earlier legend getting around with copies of the same map. Here are some of the other islands searched following the same story and a copy of the same map. No, there was no Zulmiro, or Jose Santos or John Smith or Tom Daggett or any one of the names inserted for the person who gave the map when dying. Yes, Oak Island is one, if you need I can post the newspaper articles where this story is given for Oak Island and yes they know about it there: it's a tv show only.
    KANACKI and grantler like this.

  3. #18

    Apr 2003
    51
    46 times
    Attachment 1720259

    Sound familiar?

  4. #19

    Apr 2003
    51
    46 times
    Actually the directions and treasure inventory is quite funny to read. You do realise it's mostly the ones given in a work of fiction called 'Captain Kid's Millions' published in the 1880s and gave this map of Trinity Land (Trinidade Island)?

    Attachment 1720261

  5. #20

    Mar 2015
    581
    3161 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Hello Freeman

    Your attachments never can out. They might exceed size limit? I get that some times posting pictures. If your please try posting them again I would be interested in seeing them.

    Kanacki
    PetesPockets55 likes this.

  6. #21

    Apr 2003
    51
    46 times
    Just click on them as they are live links and they will display.
    From memory Captain Kid's Millions starts with an elderly sailor passing a map etc to a young man. Then there are different periods and searchers who are all related through fate and lineage. The first directions about all the stones are useless as an earthquake is found to have changed the landscape and buried them but luckily a tidal wave uncovers one marked stone under which treasure is found. This then gets moved and the next person finds it by decoding the message in the writing around the map that says it's in the waterfall.

    It's been awhile since I read it.
    Last edited by freeman; Jun 07, 2019 at 10:02 AM.

  7. #22
    us
    Samantha

    Apr 2018
    Phoenix, Arizona
    White‘s Sierra Madre White‘s TM–600
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    Cache Hunting
    I do not doubt there is buried pirate treasure. Piracy was a business. The shipowner, the captain and crews all got a cut. If a captain didn’t bring in the business he would be replaced by somebody who would. A smart Captain would set aside some goodies but most did not. If you look how most pirate careers ended they were surprised by warships and usually were too drunk to fight. Movies and books give the impression of pirate treasures buried all over. Similarly, some T Net threads would lead you to believe there’s a Spanish treasure buried nearby you practically everywhere in the US. They aren’t. As for this island, there COULD be something buried there. But why would bury it there? 700 miles from anywhere

  8. #23

    Mar 2015
    581
    3161 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Hello Samanthy

    In answer to some of your questions.

    The Golden Age of Piracy. ... Thousands of pirates were active between 1650 and 1720, and these years are sometimes known as the 'Golden Age' of piracy. Famous pirates from this period include Henry Morgan, William 'Captain' Kidd, 'Calico' Jack Rackham, Bartholomew Roberts and the fearsome Blackbeard (Edward Teach). When people think about pirates they think in the context of this time frame. Most of the fanciful romantic image of pirate comes from that time period.

    Between 1814 and 1838 there was a mini golden age of piracy. Was more squalid affair. However the mini golden age of piracy was little different to the Golden age of piracy. 1814 -1838 was less structured. More violent and less involvement with ship owners. Other than disaffected privateers straying into piracy. Life and conditions was so appalling for average sailor at time. Many sailor mutinied against their captains and stole the ship. Generally there was no structured agreement other than share what ever they stole. Another even among-st the pirates you said your self there was shifting loyalties. I agree with you a captain if he did not perform then he was replaced. The biggest fear and deterrent is to end up on gallows. Most pickings during this time period was rather not so much great galleons from Spanish Gold fleets but small semi impoverished merchant men of all flags. Some times captured cargo was much harder to Fence ...to sell. So having depository hidden away to sailors the further away from authorities the better. That is why remote places had their uses.

    And of course I agree will you totally there are many treasure stories that are just lore. Its human nature is it not to love a good yarn. And what kid who love to hear having a treasure yarn in their town to dream for?

    Another factor why would pirates constantly on the run would bury any treasure at all? Simply if you walked into a bar wanting to buy drinks offering to pay with it Golden chalice or artifacts taken from church like in the pictures below. Your going to get busted and end up on the end of a hangman's rope. wages was pitifully low if a sailor turns up with 10 years worth of wages its going to raise suspicion is it not? So the concept of hiding caches even with criminals today such as drug lords is not a new one. That said in the end very few of pirates ever really profited long term form their life of crime.

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    Kanacki
    Last edited by KANACKI; Jun 07, 2019 at 08:52 PM.
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  9. #24
    us
    Samantha

    Apr 2018
    Phoenix, Arizona
    White‘s Sierra Madre White‘s TM–600
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    30 times
    Cache Hunting
    I understand the need for caches. But there is also the matter of convenience. Trindade has little water, no other resources and is 700 miles from the mainland of Brazil. How many days just to sail that? 7 days? 14 days round trip? And probably longer depending on where you are going!
    Last edited by Samanthy; Jun 08, 2019 at 12:32 AM.

  10. #25

    Apr 2003
    51
    46 times
    The place just became involved as it (sort of) matched the shape of 'the island' shown on copies of a map getting around since the late 18th century. It was one of a number of number of islands searched, all looking for the same treasure. The give away is when you orient all the different islands searched the 'treasure spot' is at the same relative location on each. I posted an image before showing three of the more well known Atlantic Ocean islands where this occurred: Oak Island, Isle Haute and Trinidade Island. There are a number of other islands or locations on the Atlantic seaboard but these are fairly obscure or forgotten about.

    The other giveaway is the story attached with each location always starts with 'a sailor/ex pirate/captain/Billy bones died and left a treasure map for the hoard': a copy of the same map then appears.

    I have a copy of the original map which started it all that was published in 1934 as part of an 'armchair hunt'. From what I could find out it was of Spanish origin and does lead to a real cache IF you can work out which island it was for which is why all the different islands were searched.
    Last edited by freeman; Jun 08, 2019 at 12:09 AM.

  11. #26

    Mar 2015
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    3161 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Hello Samanthy

    Travel times depend on current wind and waves I have been fortunate in life to have experienced the freedom of the seas. Being a skipper in my own right that sailed the world. For sailors the distance of 700 miles are not really an issue because 700 miles is out of prying eyes of coastal traffic.

    Freeman I wish you best with yor interesting research.

    Kanacki

  12. #27
    us
    Samantha

    Apr 2018
    Phoenix, Arizona
    White‘s Sierra Madre White‘s TM–600
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    30 times
    Cache Hunting
    Hello Kanacki

    Learned my sailing on an El Toro
    KANACKI likes this.

  13. #28

    Mar 2015
    581
    3161 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Hello Samanthy

    I grew up in New Guinea. My first experience sailing was catamarans. In 1966 at the age of 16 I bought a small timber sail boat that once owned by a Dutchman. Who had sailed this tiny sailboat all the way to New Guinea from Holland. It was in poor condition. Took me year to get seaworthy. And few years to master her. She was called " geest van de wind " meaning "
    Spirit of the wind" in English.

    It was a single masted sailing boat with a twin keel so in places of low tide she could sit upright on her keel. She had a fore and aft sail. a cabin in the bow with hatch above, a small hand pump toilet shower compartment. A small galley with gas cooking stove, ice box and a galley dining table that folded down into a small double bed. just under the entrance hatchway there was radio and small chart table opposite. More than two people the yacht was cramped. the open bridge was at the rear. She was steered by a tiller. yet there was controls for a small inboard low horse power Perkings diesel engine. The seats on the sides of the cockpit either sat over fuel water tanks while your feet rested on a floor with hatch over the small engine.

    Now this was a step up to sailing something like a caravan with sails around it. But it did teach me a lot about sailing. First I used to only sail it during the day around the bay of the caldera Rabaul sits on. I really learned about fickle winds tides and currents back then. I learned to tack and to navigate. From there over years in between marrying having a family working in the mining game I got my general mariners cert, then Bosun, mate then finally skipper. Did a sailing training run of "Start of India" A Museum ship, had some small very short stints "Eye of Wind" ,"Pelican" and Picton castle each was labour intensive. learned a lot about teamwork.

    Eventually buying my own Brigantine Drumbeat in 2000 sailed it around the world and Pacific. The longest cruise was around the Pacific we lived on it about 11 months. And finally bought a schooner in 2014 "Ocean Child". Technically I am retired but......Both are now passed onto my two oldest sons. Ones operating in Indonesia and other in Thailand. The Drumbeat was built for North Atlantic and built very tough with 5 bulkheads.Able traverse all oceans. The Schooner "Ocean Child" is more twitchy in Handing. More ideal coast inter island hoping.

    I am hoping to sail again as my Son a skipper himself of the "Ocean child" has been exploring hidden uninhabited islands in Indonesia very few ever to get see. You can see her lost in middle of harbour of an amazing remote uninhabited island below.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Kanacki
    Last edited by KANACKI; Jun 09, 2019 at 09:54 AM.
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  14. #29
    us
    Samantha

    Apr 2018
    Phoenix, Arizona
    White‘s Sierra Madre White‘s TM–600
    45
    30 times
    Cache Hunting
    The twin keel was a smart idea. Speaking of Indonesia, that would be a very good place to hunt for pirate treasures!
    KANACKI likes this.

  15. #30

    Mar 2015
    581
    3161 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Quote Originally Posted by Samanthy View Post
    The twin keel was a smart idea. Speaking of Indonesia, that would be a very good place to hunt for pirate treasures!

    Indonesia has a long history of piracy. Even today piracy still exists in some parts of archipelago. With such a large impoverished population looting of historical artifacts is rife. Even if you get a deal with government there they are notorious corrupt. And have known to renege on any such deals. To operate there you have to partner in Indonesian company. Here is basic rundown of obtaining an agreement.


    GOVERNMENT RULES & REGULATIONS

    In Indonesia acquiring a land treasure hunting or shipwreck survey and salvage permit involves 17 different Government Officials from 13 different Government Departments and ultimately the permit is issued by the Government Department.

    1. APPLICATION FEES required.

    2. SHARING AGREEMENT:
    Fifty/Fifty (50/50) without deducting any project cost (due to complaints by several foreign salvage groups this agreement is currently under revision whereby the project cost will be deducted before the 50/50 split. Or, there is even a rumor that the sharing will be changed to 60/40 (60 for the salvage company/40 for the Indonesian Government) as this would make it more fair to the Treasure Hunting or salvage companies.

    LICENSING PROCEDURE:
    a) Survey Permit - Officially they say you can receive this after 21 days but realistically can take up to six (6) or eight (8) weeks to receive (see details below) and is valid for up to three months. It is renewable. Any company who wishes to treasure hunting or salvage a shipwreck must first be issued a Survey Permit. The Survey Permit allows the company to first visit the site and take photos and retrieve one or two samples only. Only after this process has been completed is the only time a treasure hunting or Salvage Permit can be applied for.

    INDONESIAN PARTNER COMPANY:
    As with most SEA countries, no foreign company can work in Indonesia without having an Indonesian Partner Company. All licenses issued in Indonesia are only in the name of the local company. All documentation is also in Bahasa Indonesia (Indonesian language).

    FOREIGNERS:
    All foreigners who want to visit the work site and actually participate in offshore operations MUST also apply for their KITAS (work) Visas. This process takes up to ten (10) days and can be done anytime (yes, since they actually take your passport you must be physically there in Indonesia during this process). The cost is Rp6,000,000 (approx. US$600) each for a six (6) months multiple-entry KITAS Visa. Please Note that once you have a KITAS Visa stamp in your passport that you must now pay EXIT TAXES of US$250 EVERY TIME you exit Indonesia after that.

    WORK SEASON:
    The best time to work in Indonesia is between March and September when the weather is calm and it is NOT monsoon season. However, if you have a large vessel and/or are working in a sheltered and/or protected area you may be able to work even through monsoon season.

    However laws a many of changed since then as UNESCO has been pushing hard to get them to sign the agreement.

    Kanacki
    grantler likes this.

 

 
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