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Thread: PENNSYLVANIA?S LOST

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  1. #41
    mx
    Nov 2011
    143
    55 times
    none

    Re: PENNSYLVANIA?S LOST

    This search is heating up with some of the guys talking about getting a group together to search Gardeau. There's plenty of areas and cellar holes to search at this location. There were lots of homes and commercial businesses. I located some old photographs of Gardeau including the Parker Mineral Sanitarium! The locals swear that this treasure is still there. Notice how the mountains were just stripped of all timber. It's all grown back today. I did find the exact location of the Sizerville mineral spring just before Gardeau. I have an assortment of photos of Gardeau that should aid in locating the Parker Hotel and other buildings and have leads on other nearby ghost towns.
    Last edited by TreasureWriter; Sep 02, 2012 at 10:54 PM.

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  3. #42
    ca
    Nov 2011
    Higher-North-Shore Qc.
    Garret Ace 350
    264
    6 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Re: PENNSYLVANIA?S LOST

    Have bookmarked this, always find treasure hunting stories most interesting and entertaining, thanks.

  4. #43
    us
    Oct 2011
    Chester County pa
    303
    6 times
    Metal Detecting, Cache Hunting ,And addto our History

    Re: PENNSYLVANIA?S LOST

    Those pics are amazing......WOW

  5. #44
    mx
    Nov 2011
    143
    55 times
    none

    Re: PENNSYLVANIA?S LOST

    I found the source of this treasure story quite a while ago. It was printed in the History of McKean County published in 1890. Henry Shoemaker picked up on the story from this book and published his article "Treasure Cave is McKean County Mystery" in 1950. Francis Scully simply reprinted Shoemaker's story.
    Last edited by TreasureWriter; Sep 02, 2012 at 11:01 PM.

  6. #45

    Sep 2004
    Where ever my coffee cup lands
    Fisher 1280X
    267
    1 times

    Re: PENNSYLVANIA?S LOST

    Treasure Hunter, This is a very good report and thanks. You did your research. If there is any silver buried there in a cave this make the most logic I've heard. I had a friend that found some small silver bars there and financed his move to California years ago. Likely some of the larger bars were taken out of the stash and remelted down to smaller bars for sale? As they had no smelting marks on them. So whom ever should find these bars again will have to be very quite about it, as to find them will be one thing, but to keep them will be another. Plus if I think I need someone there to work with I'll keep you in mind. Thanks again for your report.
    Life is not a problem to be solved, but a mystery to be lived.

  7. #46
    mx
    Nov 2011
    143
    55 times
    none

    Re: PENNSYLVANIA?S LOST

    Hi Monk,

    I'll keep reporting what I uncover as I research. I'm not in this for the silver; in fact I would be amazed if someone finds any. It would be interesting to search the area where your friend found some silver if you remember the location I'd love to check it out. I think you're correct to believe that the silver would be in a cave or maybe buried. You can see from the pictures that these mountains were stripped bare of all vegetation buy 1897 and if the silver was visible the loggers would have found it. I'm happy just poking around old homesteads turning up a coin here or there and a lot of old junk. I'd love to find some axe heads like logging camp and Gardeau is a great place to have the opportunity to find these. It would be nice to find some things to donate to the historical society as well. I enjoy the research and want to document Gardeau and other lost towns in the area. I'm also researching ghost towns in the Clearfield, Elk, McKean and Potter Counties. The wild west has nothing over this area when it comes to ghost towns. I've got about 50-60 in my files and growing. I really need to get out and hike this area rather than just driving along Gardeau Road stopping intermittently.

    I'm getting ready to overlay a plat map of the homesteads over a topo map from the mid 1800's and then search the most promising homesteads for cellar holes. Once I document these I'll then try to get permission to search some of them. I'll get the GPS coordinates so that other guys can find them in the future without all the work.

    Treasure Writer

  8. #47
    ru
    Jan 2012
    26
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Re: PENNSYLVANIA?S LOST

    thanks for the great pics and all that info keep us updated

  9. #48
    mx
    Nov 2011
    143
    55 times
    none

    Re: PENNSYLVANIA?S LOST

    Well.....we just returned from a great day of THing and I'd like to thank Turtle Dove for planning the search and Potter Poker for his vast knowledge of the area and all things TH related. I'm humbled by his experience.
    Last edited by TreasureWriter; Sep 02, 2012 at 11:00 PM.
    simonds likes this.

  10. #49
    us
    May 2009
    46

    Re: PENNSYLVANIA?S LOST

    If we to to talk in person, we would have a friendly discussion about this Indian Trail Marker Tree, so don't take this the wrong way. Quite often I've seen people post pictures on Tnet of bent trees that they say are Indian trail marker trees. I do a lot of hiking and come across numerous trees that are bent into odd shapes. These trees are usually deformed by a tree or branch falling on the tree when it was a sapling and it grows crooked after that. When were the last indians in Pa? 1700s? A tree bent by an indian in that era would not living today.

  11. #50
    mx
    Nov 2011
    143
    55 times
    none

    Re: PENNSYLVANIA?S LOST

    Hello Mr-Dig-it
    Thanks for the insight. I see your point.
    Native Americans were prevalent in this area into the 20th century. The main Indian trail lies just across the valley and acted as a portage trail from the Susquehanna to the Allegheny River. The location of this tree is along a trail and stream that run perpendicular to the main trail and leads from "the Great Elk Lick" a place named by and well known to the Native Americans and described to George Parker by a Native American when giving directions to Parker to to a hunting location where animals amassed around a mineral spring. This trail follows "Elk Lick Run" now named "Parker Run" for about 5 miles before diverging to a place called dividing ridge and into the direction of Norwich in another valley where George Parker resided. The tree is dead and has a fairly large diameter and given its proximity to the main trail and the directions given to Parker I would think that there is a better likelihood that it was a marker that designated the "Elk Lick Trail" as the one that leads over dividing ridge. I hiked this trail again today up through Stone Chimney Hollow and given the terrain it is also probably the easiest, most direct hike over the ridge and to Indian Run, Potato Creek and Norwich. I didn't see any other markers, but these mountains were clear cut in the mid 1800-early 1900's so it's likely they were removed and never recreated. This one may have survived because it is very close to Gardeau or created in the late 1800's after the logging of Gardeau. These trails were still actively used into the 1900's and it's location places it close to the intersection of two trails. Then on the other hand you could be entirely correct. It is nice to have a marker tree at a trail head however.

  12. #51
    mx
    Nov 2011
    143
    55 times
    none

    Re: PENNSYLVANIA?S LOST

    If you're thinking of searching this area...I was also told of the sighting of 10 different black bears last fall in this area and have seen bear tracks on the trail. Coyotes appear to be over populated and they run the logging roads. I saw the tracks and scat of an entire pack today on the same trail we hiked yesterday where none existed. Stay aware, I continually look behind as I hike. While these animals are not generally aggressive both have records of killing people. Just 3 coyotes killed a young woman in Canada last year and I viewed 7 sets of tracks today in a pack. They had fed on a deer.
    Last edited by TreasureWriter; Sep 02, 2012 at 11:00 PM.

  13. #52
    mx
    Nov 2011
    143
    55 times
    none

    Background on the "Blackbeard's Treasure" Story



    What's important here is that Shoemaker collected thousands of stories from "old timers" in Pennsylvania and it may be worth a trip to the Carnegie Library in Pittsburgh to check out the collection and old maps.
    Last edited by TreasureWriter; Sep 02, 2012 at 10:58 PM.

  14. #53
    mx
    Nov 2011
    143
    55 times
    none
    My treasure will end up back in the ground, where it came from as my legacy to the hobby that has given me so much enjoyment. (probably to the dismay of my children) Happy hunting. Keep reading TreasureNet and you'll be the first to know when it's buried.

    Attachment 621375Attachment 621376Attachment 621377Attachment 621378
    Last edited by TreasureWriter; Sep 02, 2012 at 10:59 PM.
    kayden likes this.

  15. #54
    mx
    Nov 2011
    143
    55 times
    none
    I was once again in Gardeau on 14 April 2012. I had the opportunity to meet with one of the guys that owns a hunting camp directly across from the Hotel foundation. He has marked the location of the original spring that bubbles up out of the ground. I'll get some video and pictures the next time I am there. It's amazing.....the deer still congregate at this spring.....the water is supposed to taste horrible and it's said that if you drink a couple of glasses of the water don't be too far from a bathroom! This area is called God's Country but God only knows why someone would want to drink this stuff.....cheers!

  16. #55
    mx
    Nov 2011
    143
    55 times
    none
    I just posted a new picture of Gardeau in the PA Ghost Town Group. It's one looking from North to South that people probably haven't seen yet. It's particularly interesting because it shows a ladder on Parker's Tomb possibly indicating that it was just being built. Anyway it gives a different perspective on the town and you can see the hotel from a different angle.

    On another note....I found a picture with a large cross carved into a stone that was supposed to be in the same area as the Jesuit Treasure of the Borie. It is along the water. It's a poor quality picture and I can't make out the cross but it is labeled as such and was taken by a minister in the area. I'm going to try to clean up the photo with a forensic photo tool to see if it helps. In the research there seems to be some conflict in the description of where the picture was taken exactly. I'm trying to sort this out as well. Maybe this is the break that we have all been looking for?

 

 
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