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Thread: The Lost Mines of the Desert - Part V: The Lost Dutch-Oven Mine

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  1. #16
    um
    Dec 2008
    1,868
    894 times

    Re: The Lost Mines of the Desert - Part V: The Lost Dutch-Oven Mine

    Goldminer:

    I sincerely hope I never pass up a Lost Mine of any kind!

    In the words of Prof. Dobie, these stories are not my own. I'm bringing to light the yarns recorded almost a hundred years ago by Horace J. West because I think they are fun to read, because it can cast light on more modern and readily available versions of the yarns, and because they provide an opportunity to learn something.

    I would be quite happy to try to dig up some versions of the Lost Yuma - but I can't provide Mr. West's version because I do not have it.

    Good luck to all,

    ~The Old Bookaroo
    Do you have good books in good condition you are never going to re-read? Clean 'em out!
    Operation Paperback collects gently used books and sends them to American troops.

  2. #17
    um
    Dec 2008
    1,868
    894 times

    Re: The Lost Mines of the Desert - Part V: The Lost Dutch-Oven Mine

    I sincerely appreciate the kind words posted here and sent to me via PM regarding the Lost Mines of the Desert series. It’s good to know that others are enjoying reading and discussing these yarns at least as much as I do.

    There is more to this than simply another story of fabulous lost wealth – particularly if one accepts the statements that this particular tale is not true. The saga of the Lost Dutch Oven Mine can be used as a powerful research tool.

    Let’s say the reader is interested in stories of California’s lost mines and buried treasures. And the reader comes across a copy of Buried Treasures of California; Legends from California’s Mountains, Deserts, Beaches, and Cities, by W.C. Jameson (Little Rock, Arkansas: 1995). Mr. Jameson is a prolific writer on the subject, and the interested reader is bound to wonder if his accounts can be relied upon.

    I turn first to a book’s bibliography – and it’s a bad sign if there isn’t one (or least some summary of the writer’s sources). In this volume we do find one (although that is not always the case with Mr. Jameson’s works). Most of the referenced items are readily available – none can be reasonably considered unique, rare or particularly difficult to obtain. They range from the highly reliable treasure writers (“Jesse Rascoe,” Harold O. Weight), to historians of note (Joseph Henry Jackson, Robert Glass Cleland, Walton Bean) to autobiographical and contemporary (Edward Buffum and Frank Marryat [sic]) to the unfortunately far less reliable treasure scribes (Al Masters, Howard D. Clark, John D. Mitchell and, as we shall presently see, W.C. Jameson himself).

    Mr. Jameson’s introduction promises the reader “…heretofore little known tales of fortunes found and lost…” His chapters include Death Valley’s Lost Breyfogle and John Goler’s Nuggets, the Lost Cement Mine (that Mark Twain wrote about in Roughing It), the Lost Ship of the Desert, Pegleg Smith’s Lost Nuggets (Probert’s bibliography has some nine pages of references to this one – second only to the Lost Dutchman Mine, by my count). None of these can be considered any more little known than Mr. Jameson’s Selected References.

    And then there is the chapter on the Lost Dutch Oven Mine. Which is the point of this post – it just took me a while to get there. We read his account, and the most charitable I can be is to suggest he relies heavily on the John D. Mitchell version. Heavily. If Mr. Jameson had included The Miner’s Guide as one of his sources I’d suggest his account came straight from that. However, since Mr. Mitchell in his turn leaned so heavily on Horace West it probably doesn’t make much difference. Mr. Jameson's version is extremely close to Mr. Mitchell's. And in my view this puts the entire book in a highly questionable light.

    Mr. Jameson did manage to stub his toe when he attempted to add one of those touches of verisimilitude we all seek. At the end of his tale he write of the protagonist of the tale “To the many searchers and researchers who visited with this gentle, sincere man over the years…” Unfortunately for Mr. Jameson, we have on hand Walter H. Miller’s article “The Lost Dutch Oven Mine” (GOLD! Annual, 1969, Vol. 1, No. 1). “’If you fellows are looking for Tom Scofield to ask him about the Lost Dutch Oven Mine, get out of here’” the author and his friend were told when seeking an interview with Old Tom. “’Or you’re liable to find the seat of your pants full of bird shot.’”

    A gentle, sincere man, indeed!

    It would not be fair to say that Mr. Jameson adds nothing to the Lost Dutch Oven Mine story. He did spell Tom Schofield’s name with two “f’s.”

    Good luck to all,

    ~The Old Bookaroo
    lastleg likes this.
    Do you have good books in good condition you are never going to re-read? Clean 'em out!
    Operation Paperback collects gently used books and sends them to American troops.

  3. #18
    mx
    Nov 2004
    Alamos,Sonora,Mexico
    11,343
    2771 times

    Re: The Lost Mines of the Desert - Part V: The Lost Dutch-Oven Mine

    "*****" my friend bookaroo: Agreed . But I do have a question, what about stories in which YOU are the source and referrence? There are no available "written" references to use.

    Inicdentally, did you ever find any references to the "Lost gold Placers of Alamos, Sonora, Mexico"? Supposedly there weer seven men involved.

    Don Jose de La Mancha
    "I exist to live, not live to exist"

  4. #19
    um
    Nemo me impune lacesset

    Jan 2005
    DAKOTA TERRITORY
    Tesoro Lobo Supertraq, (95%) Garrett Scorpion (5%)
    5,771
    1859 times

    Re: The Lost Mines of the Desert - Part V: The Lost Dutch-Oven Mine

    Don Jose', Dueno de Real y Minas de Tayopa wrote,
    The following state assays show why I wanted them together.
    DRoOL!!! Dang amigo if that mine won't pay, NONE will. I remain ever jealous...

    Oroblanco
    SUPPORT THE BEEF INDUSTRY - EAT BEEF
    "We must find a way, or we will make one."--Hannibal Barca

  5. #20
    mx
    Nov 2004
    Alamos,Sonora,Mexico
    11,343
    2771 times

    Re: The Lost Mines of the Desert - Part V: The Lost Dutch-Oven Mine

    Good evening my friends BETH & oro: This afternoon I was riding along peacefully enjoying the sights when I realized that you were butt deep in snow, ice, and animal excrement sigh . 80 * here. Here is a familiar view to refresh your memories. I am on Ina heading East towards ORO Valley.

    Don Jose de La Mancha
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    "I exist to live, not live to exist"

  6. #21
    um
    Nemo me impune lacesset

    Jan 2005
    DAKOTA TERRITORY
    Tesoro Lobo Supertraq, (95%) Garrett Scorpion (5%)
    5,771
    1859 times

    Re: The Lost Mines of the Desert - Part V: The Lost Dutch-Oven Mine

    Don Jose', Dueno de Real y Minas de Tayopa wrote,
    Here is a familiar view to refresh your memories.
    Hmm, perhaps you spent a wee bit too much time with the vaqueros amigo, seems like you have a little mean streak. However I do not take it as any kind of offence, in fact I now extend the hand of friendship to you and our fellow amigo Joe (Cactusjumper) you probably could both use a nice break from all that terrible blazing sunshine and heat, a few weeks of playing cowboy is just what you need - and I can truly and honestly say, WISH YOU WERE HERE...

    <A view outside on a particularly nice Dakota January day, noon time>

    <Horseback riding is one of the great benefits of working as a cowboy/sheepherder, and besides the luxury of "four-wheel-drive" it comes equipped with real leather upholstery, bio-genic heating system and is 100% "green" in that it runs entirely on renewable fuels>


    <Lovely "rustic" accomodations are available for all our guest cow-pokes in the line cabins, with all the amenities of course including solar heating and flow-through ventilation>



    <sweeping vistas are just a part of your every work-a-day>


    <In your free time we will have time for some friendly card-playing>


    <You will enjoy the wonderful clean FRESH AIR>



    <We can guarantee you are 100% safe from any hurricanes too!>


    <Sadly, all good things must come to an end, but for the rest of your days, everyone will know that you are a REAL cowboy!>
    http://i147.photobucket.com/albums/r...eck/cowboy.jpg
    Oroblanco
    SUPPORT THE BEEF INDUSTRY - EAT BEEF
    "We must find a way, or we will make one."--Hannibal Barca

  7. #22
    mx
    Nov 2004
    Alamos,Sonora,Mexico
    11,343
    2771 times

    Re: The Lost Mines of the Desert - Part V: The Lost Dutch-Oven Mine

    HI ORO, after looking at your picture, or is that CJ??, with the cactus, I now know why the sheep are afraid of you.

    Don Jose de La Mancha
    "I exist to live, not live to exist"

  8. #23
    Charter Member
    us
    Sharing the culture, history and adventure of the American Southwest.

    Jun 2006
    Banning, California
    ace 250
    1,786
    36 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Re: The Lost Mines of the Desert - Part V: The Lost Dutch-Oven Mine

    hey gang,
    Scuba wrote "Old Bookaroo that was a great read. Too bad the mine was fake. I can't wait for part VI." I don't know where this has come from because, I have read a article that has it was found... This is Gold magazine Issue 1 Vol 1 Annual 1969, with the story directly told from Scholfield...

    PLL

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  9. #24
    Charter Member
    us
    Apr 2007
    God's lap
    X-terra 70 ACE 250
    11,346
    16 times

    Re: The Lost Mines of the Desert - Part V: The Lost Dutch-Oven Mine

    Sorry to get off topic....has anyone heard anything at all from Old Bookaroo?? I am worried about him as he has not logged on in a long time and has not answered email either.

  10. #25
    us
    Dec 2007
    maui, hawaii
    321
    10 times

    Re: The Lost Mines of the Desert - Part V: The Lost Dutch-Oven Mine

    thanks for taking the time to write these stories, they are very interesting and a great read. keep up the great work and hoping that you share all your writings with us. once again, thank you very much. ron 8)

 

 
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