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  1. #1

    Mar 2012
    42
    4 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Bat cave treasure near Tubac/Tumacacori

    There is a story that appears in Lovelace's 1956 Lost Mines and Hidden Treasure, "The blackgowns' Treasures are Still Safe," pp. 14-19, and in Jameson's 2009 Lost Mines and Buried Treasure of Arizona "Spanish Padres' Lost Gold Cache," pp. 111-117, about a Papago Indian finding a bat cave in which he found gold bars and Church artifacts (furniture, statues, etc). He used some of the gold to pay for food and told the trading post owner in Tubac about how to find the cave, but repented of it and covered up the entrance to the cave. It apparently remains covered up. Has anyone heard anything more about this story?

  2. #2
    mx
    Nov 2004
    Alamos,Sonora,Mexico
    11,322
    2705 times
    No, my friend, but tell me more. Among many here, that is a hot area.

    Don Jose d eLa Mancha
    "I exist to live, not live to exist"

  3. #3
    us
    Oct 2012
    Retired and traveling
    Whites 6000di Pro SL Whites Goldmaster II vSat Whites Prizim 6T
    141
    35 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Here's a link to one version of the story.
    Vampire Bat Mine

    I don't know the veracity of it, but I can't imagine someone hiking back into and climbing mountains just to cover up an old mine/cave entrance.

  4. #4

    Mar 2012
    42
    4 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Thanks I traced the story back to August 1952 Desert Magazine. How trustworthy is John Mitchel?
    Last edited by Indiana$Dirk; Jan 13, 2013 at 01:05 AM.

  5. #5

    Mar 2012
    42
    4 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    you can read most of the story here in Lovelace's 1956 Lost Mines and Hidden Treasure, "The blackgowns' Treasures are Still Safe," pp. 14-19,.

    I guess you have to have a Google account before you can read part of the story here on Google Books. sorry.....
    Last edited by Indiana$Dirk; Jan 30, 2013 at 07:53 PM.

  6. #6

    Mar 2003
    262
    111 times
    The story of the Lost Gold of the Vampire Bats was a common tale told around Southern Arizona long before it was written by John D. Mitchell in his 1952 magazine article and later in his 1953 book, "Lost Mines and Buried Treasures Along the Old Frontier." It is found on page 148 of the book. Mitchell was living in his house in Arivaca at the time his book was published. His book retells some of the stories of his 1933 book which (was published by Milton F. Rose and the Rose Printery), as well as the telling of many other tales. Mitchell did some treasure hunting after his retirement. Leland Lovelace, who was living in the old Sopori Ranch also included the story in her book. Most of the later articles were rewrites from Mitchell's and Lovelace's books.

  7. #7

    Mar 2012
    42
    4 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Thanks for the response. I find it interesting that Mitchell bases the story out of Arivaca in which he lived and Lovelace based it out of Tubac which was close to Sopori Ranch. I wonder how one can tell which is most likely? Lovelace has a lot more detail than Mitchell. And I read that there have never been Vampire bats in Arizona. They live in a much wetter clime.

  8. #8
    us
    Jan 2013
    Southern Arizona
    9
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    I live in Tubac and to the best of my knowledge there was near a Trading Post in Tubac. There was a farming settlement & Presidio that was destoryed a couple of times by Indian attacks and time. There is also the mission in Tumacacori. There are several caves and LOTS of bats. This is but one of the local stories. Many have hunted and nothing has been found yet! Rocky soil (tough dirt biking), snakes & cactus. Most notable gold area nearby is Ruby.

    rocmoc n AZ/Mexico

  9. #9

    Mar 2012
    42
    4 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    I just bought and readBrownell's "They lived in Tubac". It is a history of some of the most notable people who lived in Tubac from the Priests, Spanish Soldiers, and Spanish settlers, and on to the 20 century. In the 1850 & 60s it was a mining town with a store. The town was largely abandoned in the 60s due to the Civil War. Then it began to be settled again in the 1880s. In the 1880s there was a store in the town then too. According to Lovelace and Jameson the story of Hardwick began in 1878 when he apparently started a store in the sparsely settled region, The story doesn't say how long he had the store. I discovered two men named "Hardwick" living in Tucson (and none living anywhere south of there), in the 1880 Federal Census. If one of them is the man who had been at Tubac, he may have already abandoned the store by 1880.

    I know what the country side is like about Tubac. Been hiking in the area a few times.
    Last edited by Indiana$Dirk; Feb 01, 2013 at 10:36 PM.

  10. #10
    us
    Aug 2008
    Ahwatukee
    98
    31 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Indiana$Dirk View Post
    Thanks I traced the story back to August 1952 Desert Magazine. How trustworthy is John Mitchel?
    I'd say he's about as trustworthy as a used car salesman. I really don't believe anything he published, especially anything he got from his buddy Milton Rose.
    Last edited by hooch; Feb 04, 2013 at 10:38 AM.

  11. #11

    Mar 2012
    42
    4 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Given his rather sloppy telling of the tale, and the mention of "Vampire" bats, since there never have been vampire bats in AZ, gave me pause about Mitchel's credibility. But I have reserved judgment. Even though his tale is published before the other accounts, I think the other accounts are more accurate.

  12. #12
    us
    Aug 2008
    Ahwatukee
    98
    31 times
    I've been to a couple of places he's wrote stories about, even down in the mines. Nothing that he writes about or people he claims to have been there is even remotely close to his stories. I would suspect he was involved in writing StarTrek Episodes under a fictitios name before I believe his "there's gold in them there hills" BS stories.

  13. #13
    us
    La Migra

    Feb 2010
    Tucson, AZ
    101
    2 times
    Metal Detecting
    Old thread, I know, but I've been interested in this story too. I work around the Baboquivari Mountains and have been trying to research any treasure legends that are in the area and this seems to be the only one.
    There's barely any mines in the area as well. The only two I've found are the Allison and Ventana mines on the westside of the range. I've read that some gravel ledges on the eastside of the mountains were worked for gold as well but I don't get on that side of the mountains as much. I'm a little convinced that there just isn't that much gold in this mountain range. I've seen lots of quartz deposits and lots of iron deposits and quartz/iron deposits but nothing that would indicate gold. I don't know if the fact that the westside of the mountains are on an indian reservation made it difficult to mine or what but there doesn't seem to be much gold in these hills. A little further west in the Quijota and Comobabi mountains theres a lot more information available about very old (Indian and Spanish) mine workings so that must be where the gold is at.

  14. #14
    us
    Sep 2011
    T-2
    470
    91 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Quote Originally Posted by GreyGhost View Post
    Old thread, I know, but I've been interested in this story too. I work around the Baboquivari Mountains and have been trying to research any treasure legends that are in the area and this seems to be the only one.
    There's barely any mines in the area as well. The only two I've found are the Allison and Ventana mines on the westside of the range. I've read that some gravel ledges on the eastside of the mountains were worked for gold as well but I don't get on that side of the mountains as much. I'm a little convinced that there just isn't that much gold in this mountain range. I've seen lots of quartz deposits and lots of iron deposits and quartz/iron deposits but nothing that would indicate gold. I don't know if the fact that the westside of the mountains are on an indian reservation made it difficult to mine or what but there doesn't seem to be much gold in these hills. A little further west in the Quijota and Comobabi mountains theres a lot more information available about very old (Indian and Spanish) mine workings so that must be where the gold is at.
    Thought you might be interested in this, since you live in the area. I just bought the book last week.

    Searching for Arizona's Buried Treasures

 

 

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